Smart City Academy

Are you interested in the experiences of others working in smart city projects and organizations? The Smart City Academy provides available knowledge about smart city projects and can help you with project development. This Smart City Academy page provides you with information and researches about the impact and conditions of smart city projects. Professors, teachers and students study the initiation, management, collaboration and scaling of smart city projects and would like to share these results with you. They do so by organizing events and masterclasses, by developing smart city tools and methodologies and by making research and outcomes accessible. You can find everything here. And the good news is.... You can add your knowledge too! Are you working on Smart City research? Please feel free to share your knowledge in the Academy section, under ‘Other research and theses’. The Smart City Academy is powered by the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. If you have any questions, you can contact smartcityacademy@hva.nl

Marin Florea, President at ROMANIAN CITY MANAGERS ASSOCIATION, posted

Professionals in local public administration.

The Association of Public Administrators in Romania (AAPRO) was founded in 2010, as a follow-up of a pilot project called“Public Administrator – a success factor for an efficient management at local level” carry out by the Central Unit for the Public Administration Reform (a structure within the Romanian Ministry of Administration and Interior Affairs).

AAPRO is commited to form a national, relevant, elite and professional Body of City Managers, who must have a clear image on the background of this career and become responsible for their professional conduct and self-improvement.

The initiative to introduce the Public Administrator position at each local level in Romania targets an higher lever of professionalism at counties, municipalities, cities and communes staff.

The romanian equivalent of the city manager can be hired upon the Mayor’s proposal or the one of the local council (wich must give the final aproval anyway), after a transparent selection process.

His main responsibilities are to coordinate some of the public administration affairs and services (on an agreed agenda) and to do other specific tasks delegated by the Mayor / President of County Council, all of these concluded in a management contract, based on clear management objectives and performance criteria.

The City Manager is one common thing among the efficient and successful local governments
all over the world. Adopting him in the romanian administration was a step from public adminsitration to public management, focusing on delivery good qaulity services for the citizens.

The Public Administrator, as we call it here, is not another birocrat, but a strategist, a visonary, balancing day-to-day (organizational) problem solving with planning and shaping the future, acording to the adopted local strategy and the community aspirations.

At the local level, the elected body and the technical staff, coordinated by the Mayor or the President of County Council and the Public Administrator, must first find aut and understand what people want, need and hope, then come up with a strategy, an action plan, seek for solutions, means and resources, involve the local actors such as bussines community and civil society, and communicate at any moment what has been done so far, and what is is comming.

In this picture, the Public Administrator has a leading role, he is an communicator, technology facilitator, and can be, if the Mayor delegates him, even budget chief authorizing officer.

Since 2013, the Association of City Managers in Romania, is a member of ICMA (International City / County Management Association), the most important and strong association internationally in terms of management in local public administration.

In 2019, the Association of City Managers in Romania hosted the most important event, the International Regional Conference ICMA, an event attended by over 220 representatives from 15 countries around the world.

Currently, in Romania activate more than 450 Public Administrators (the number varies from month to monyh), as follows :
- out of 41 counties, 26 ocupied positions and 7 vacancies
- out of 103 municipies, 40 ocupied positions and 37 vacancies
- out of 216 cities, 54 ocupied positions and 65 vacancies
- out of 2850 communes, 340 ocupied positions and 350 vacancies

Those above figures makes 459 vacancies in total, with the observation that, in many cases, we are talking about small comunes with scarce budgets.

The Romanian City Managers Association (AAPRO) conducted a survey among its members that identified the needs for training, building local capacities on climate protection, urban regeneration, structural changes and energy policies, concept of smart city and creatively intelligent communities.

Establishing appropriate training structures for the now and future City Managers is essential for supporting the development of the cities and climate strategies (it aims to encourage cities and municipalities to take concrete actions for climate protection in Romania), urban regeneration and structural changes, concept of smart city and creatively intelligent communities.

This project focuses on the competences that the city managers must have in order to achieve a multiplication effect through their contribution.
The nationwide implementation of a systematic local energy management using the City Managers can thus make an important step to tapp existing saving potentials in different regions and to establish a sustainable portfolio management.

We hope that, with your support, that the outcomes of this important project, can be forwarded on an extended scale to the local institutions (schools, hospitals, etc) and communities, as good practices, improving the energy efficiency status and reducing the energy poverty, urban regeneration and structural changes, concept of smart city and creatively intelligent communities.

The pilot group will be composed of 50 to 80 city managers upon their self enrollment and applying few clear selection parameters : level of municipality, experience, english language, etc.
The target group will be afterward authorized to further train other city managers and employees of the local municipalities. This core team is expected to disseminate the information and to act as an experts group in our Association.

As Romania has (at this moment) a deficit of at least 250 city managers, the learning and workshops center will be powerful tool, a public management academy and a testing facility for the ones applying for this position.

Marin Florea's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Liza Verheijke, Community Manager , posted

Official launch of the HvA Expertise Centre Applied AI during Month of the AAI

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Get to know the Expertise Centre Applied Artificial Intelligence (ECAAI) of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences! Launched in January 2020, ECAAI has turned November in the Month of the AAI, in which it will present itself and its labs officially.

We co-create to make AI work, that’s the motto of ECAAI. And together with you, the expertise centre will make its official launch work. You’re invited to join on Thursday the 5th of November. ECAAIs scientific director Nanda Piersma will tell more about the latest developments, there will be a keynote from Jann de Waal (founder of INFO & Chair Topteam Creative Industries) and ECAAIs advisory council will participate in a panel discussion. So if you want to know all about the expertise centre, please sign up via the event page.

Please note that the launch will be held in Dutch.

PROGRAM
16.00 | Start & Welcome by Frank Kresin, dean of the Faculty Digital Media and Creative Industries of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences
16.05 | Introduction by Nanda Piersma
16.10 | Presentation labs
16.15 | Keynote by Jann de Waal
16.25 | Presentation labs
16.30 | Panel discussion with ECAAIs advisory council
16.50 | Conclusion by Geleyn Meijer, rector of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences
17.00 | End plenary part + Possibility to have a chat with the experts of the labs in break-out sessions
17.30 | End launch

Curious about our experts? Please find the links to their break-out sessions here:
https://www.hva.nl/ecaai/gedeelde-content/evenementen/evenementen/2020/11/officiele-lancering-expertise-centre-applied-artificial-intelligence.html?origin=DIJGgOuoQ62GFFPyxqo2Ag?i

But that’s not all, a variety of activities is waiting for you in the Month of the AAI, where it’s all about applied AI, meaningful applications and different application domains. All activities will be listed here, including webinars with Amsterdam Data Science, live casts with Pakhuis de Zwijger and talks at SIAs congress and Gala van de Wetenschap. ECAAI even has the privilege to present its own Dutch Applied AI Award during the Computable Awards.

Don’t miss a thing and subscribe to ECAAIs newsletter

For questions, you can reach out to <appliedai@hva.nl>

About the Expertise Centre Applied Artificial Intelligence

ECAAI encompasses all of the HvAs AI research and education activities. This centre drives the development of applications of AI technology in a responsible and inclusive manner. AI technology and its implications for companies, organisations, governments and people can only be understood in context and through experimentation. Each faculty of the HvA has created a lab that brings research, education and practices together to solve short and middle term challenges in the application of AI.

Curious about these labs, where you can work together? Please find them at www.hva.nl/ai

Liza Verheijke's picture Online event on Nov 5th
Folkert Leffring, Digital Media Manager , posted

Amsterdam and Helsinki launch AI registers to detail city systems

The cities of Helsinki and Amsterdam have worked together to each launch a first-of-its-kind Artificial Intelligence Register.

“Together with the city of Helsinki, we are on a mission to create as much understanding about algorithms as possible and be transparent about the way we – as cities – use them,” commented Touria Meliani, Deputy Mayor of Amsterdam (Digital City).

Folkert Leffring's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Audrie van Veen, International Strategist at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Helsinki publishes guide to agile urban pilots

How to get the most out of urban experimentation? The guidebook for urban developers sums up learnings and experiences from agile piloting in Helsinki.
The Pocket Book for Agile Piloting shares the experiences from Smart Kalasatama and Jätkäsaari Mobility Lab in Helsinki and condenses the key learnings in a pragmatic and easily digestible way. Free download via Forum Virium

Audrie van Veen's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

WeMakeThe.City RESET: Digital Rights

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After two successful editions, the WeMakeThe.City festival is heading for 2025 as a biennale: the 750th anniversary of Amsterdam. This year the uncertain future of our city and metropolitan region was discussed in a 12-hour livecast marathon on the 21st of September. The WeMakeThe.City theme ‘Reset’ brings together genius thinking, imagination and creativity to formulate alternative perspectives for action. How are we going to do things differently in the coming years? How do we work together to make our metropolis fairer, more inclusive, more sustainable, more climate-resilient, safer, more successful and happier? After all, together we make the city of, for and by everyone!

During last spring's lockdown, it became even clearer how much we depend on the digital world. We meet, chat and date in front of the screen. A solution to combat the spread of Covid-19 is also being sought in the digital domain. These developments have raised the privacy issue again: how can people's data rights be protected? Such as anonymity, transparency and control over data. Time for a good conversation about values and the importance of digital civil rights.

The session kicks off with Marleen Stikker, director of Waag and Ger Baron, Chief Technology Officer of the City of Amsterdam. Marleen explains what our digital human rights are. ‘These are the same rights just as in the analogue world. Where there is relatively much attention for analogue human rights, our civil rights in the digital domain have run wild, too little attention has been paid to this. Let's reclaim those rights! It is for example about the right to be forgotten, the right to be anonymous, but most important to me is digital sovereignty. Everyone should have the possibility to have insights in their own actions online.’

Ger agrees with Marleen. According to him, governments, and cities as well, collects too many data about residents and the public space without even knowing what they want to do with these data.’ The reason to collect them should be to learn something specific that you can improve or help people. Helping people with the collection of data also brings in new dilemmas. The city used to have a collaboration with energy providers for example. Once someone didn’t pay for the energy service, they sent out a message to the city administration. The City could then prevent someone get evicted from his/her home.

This example is not enough reason for Marleen to collect the data: ‘To me, this sounds as if we didn’t invest in our society. We could have helped these people as well if they had adequate supervision or guidance. In last years, we invested heavily in the digital domain and we made budget cuts on home care, debt counselling and community police officers. Digital solutions are not always the best solutions! Especially not when all kinds of companies have data without people knowing about this.’ Ger: ‘To a certain point I agree with this point. Digital rights also include rights to know about the data that is collected, why this is and what you can do about this. This is currenty not transparant at all, even though the City of Amsterdam is becoming more and more about about his.

Marleen: ‘I see the City of Amsterdam going in the right direction, by starting for example the Coalition for Digital Rights. However, the steps in this direction go really slow, especially in politics. This way, it remains unclear what rules companies dealing with personal data should obey. That’s why Marleen also calls on politicians in The Hague: guarantee digital human rights by imposing conditions on the market.’

Next up is Miram Rasch, researcher and teacher at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and writer of the book ‘Friction. Ethics in times of dataism. Her book opens with a story about escaping the eyes of data collectors and algorithms. She states this is only possible at home. And even there, it becomes harder. ‘We have smart meters, smartphones, smart tvs. It is not clear why these devices need to collect data, with whom they share them. We don’t know now, but especially we don’t know in the future. Everybody has something to hide, because we don’t know yet what we should hide. Of course you have to inform yourself about the conditions you’re accepting. However, this is not easy at all. Try to read the Terms and Conditions of the services you use, the texts are too long and complicated. Unfortunately it can take a long before something changes. The few individuals who are conscious about the digital world, won’t change it. We need rules and regulations! But we know from the past, that maybe something heavy has to happen before people open their eyes.’

Jim Boevink, advisor Taskforce Digital Safety at the City of Amsterdam, starts an intermezzo about the right to be anonymous. Marleen Stikker: ‘People who want to abuse others, are free to hide themselves. This is because platforms are not responsible for the content their users post. They earn money with these users, they are their business models. But they they are not responsible for things happening on their platform. This is the first thing that has to change. The legal system is not in order. Make them responsible for the content on their platforms.’ M**arleen: ‘And good to emphasize: someone who is critical about the digital domain and the internet, is not necessarily against the digital world. We only have to make the internet safe and reliable!’**

Want to watch the livecast (in Dutch) yourself? Check <https://dezwijger.nl/programma/reset-digital-rights>.

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder , posted

ModelMe3D - City Information Modeling !!!DEMO!!!

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Howdy - this Friday 25.09 @12h we'll be giving a demo to show you MM3D - a new “white board” for city information modeling that can empower you or any other project stakeholders to plan, collaborate & share projects. In this webinar we’ll show you what all these features and functionalities mean for your own real-world projects. We’ll be using the Marineterrein (former navy base) in the heart of Amsterdam as our user case. Interested? Grab a sandwich and sign up here: bit.ly/MM3D_MT

Tom van Arman's picture #DigitalCity
Mathieu Dasnois, Communications Manager at Metabolic, posted

High-tech solutions to the circular economy and digital citizenship

How can Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLT) and Blockchain contribute to a more transparent, sustainable and inclusive future?

As we launch the DLT4EU programme, we are having a panel discussion on the potential role and pitfalls of DLT in Europe. In the panel Indy Johar from Dark Matter Labs will join Piret Tõnurist, Innovation Lead at OECD - OCDE, and Ludovic Courcelas, Government Strategy Lead at ConsenSys. Together they will discuss how DLT and blockchain can encourage a more circular and democratic society.

Join us for this public online event on September 17th from 6pm CET.

More info on the DLT4EU programme: https://www.metabolic.nl/projects/dlt4eu/

Mathieu Dasnois's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Data Dilemmas: How to Get People to Use Contact Tracing Apps – event recap

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People around the globe are trying to fightCOVID-19 for months now and progress is made in developing ways to do so. While medicines and vaccines are being developed and testing facilities scaled up, we try to get a grip on the spread of the virus by doing contact-tracing. Up until now, the Netherlands have done so by tracing interactions of people who tested positive and informing them. To help determine the people who should be warned, several contact-tracing apps have been developed and introduced around the world. One more successful than the other.

What can we learn from these first trials of introducing country-wide tracing apps? What are the conditions under which people are willing to install and use them? On the 3rd of September, Amsterdam Smart City and Datalab organised an online edition of ‘Data Dilemmas’ in which an international expert panel shared their learnings while working with contact-tracing apps. One of the core values of Amsterdam Smart City is to put people in the center, a nice topic for the session.

Development and community engagement

A common theme in the success of the adoption and acceptance of the app by the public is community engagement. Both during the development stages and after the launch. This was first stated by Ivo Jansch*,* architect of the ‘Coronamelder’ for the Dutch Ministry of Health, but soon backed up by every member of the panel. Dutch, Irish and Swiss apps were developed publically through Github, where tech-savvy community members could gain insights on or even contribute to the production of the app. Although this approach laid bare all early missteps and shortcomings to the public and the press, our expert panel agreed that this was a key factor in the public acceptance of the app.

The Norwegian app Smittestopp was not successful in public adoption. The reason could be that the development of the app was put in the hands of a single company, mainly behind closed doors. The code was not made public for licensing terms, only for possible commercial interest. This created little trust in both tech experts and the population, Norwegian privacy expert and app evaluator Eivind Arvesen concluded. The app was soon removed from the app stores and cannot be used anymore.

There is, however, a thing as sharing things too early, project manager of the Irish COVID-tracker app Gar MacCríosta argued. When you are at such an early stage that there are still many options, ‘you open a door to chaos’ and the public could lose trust in the government being able to get to a good outcome. But as things moved on and the solution became more certain, the Irish became way more transparent about what they were developing.

Hilleen Smeets from the GGD Amsterdam zoomed in on the challenge of gaining outreach of the app in populations where testing is low, positive testing is high and health apps in general are not used as much. Think of poor people or overweight people. These are people do not go and test when showing symptoms. They are the ones that should be motivated to use the app, since they create the blind spot in the analogue contact tracing. Therefore, the app and the campaign should not only focus on gaining trust and understanding in general, but also pay attention to the motivators and barriers that influence app adoption in these populations specifically.

Provide options in data sharing and participation

Freedom of choice was another factor in public acceptance of the contact-tracing apps. In Norway, users were not given an option to decide how much data they were willing to share. The app gathered data to control virus spreading by contact tracing, it was a way for the government to evaluate interventions and provide insights in epidemiological models and public movement. To do this, the data was stored centrally, which allowed the continuous use of data from all devices, providing both user traceability and identification. People could either agree with the app collecting data for all these purposes or not use the app at all.

Something that does not suit a government, Gar MacCríosta noted. ‘If you are trying to be open and trying to protect privacy, decentralised data storage is your only option. Otherwise you are building up contact information and social graph information, something a government cannot do. People give their datafreely to Facebook and other social networks, but in the context of a government response this is different.’ The Irish app also features a symptom tracker,news and updates about COVID-19, and the possibility for people at risk to put in their phone number for a support team. Eventually over 80% of the app users decided to do this and are therefore contactable, improving the analogue tracing system that was already in place. The digital and analogue systems of contract tracing are fully integrated. The control of users in sharing their data and providing more ‘customer services’ to these users seems to improve the adoption by the population.

Hannes Grasegger, Swiss tech journalist, added that it is important that the choice not to use the app should not have restrictive consequences in everyday life. For instance, restaurants and other public areas where people gather could only allow people when they use the app. To prevent this, a legal process has started in Switzerland. In the same light, the Swiss have decided to determine when to phase out the app, so it does not become an eternal monitor.

Check out the stream of this Data Dilemmas event!

[

Livestream | How to get people to use contact tracing apps

How to successfully introduce contact tracing apps? *This is the livestream of the Data Dilemmas event of September 3 2020!* In smart city projects, technology is almost never the issue. Success is highly depended on whether people will actually need, use and understand technology. This also goe

amsterdamsmartcity YouTube](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dRq4dfxokE)

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Bernard MERKX, CEO, owner at GreenWavePlastics, posted

re useable personal protection products

Unfortunately we see an increase in the litter statistics of gloves and one time used face masks that people dispose off by just dropping it on the street and in nature.

With my business partners we have made some products that are re useable, fully recyclable and all the green parts are already made from recycled plastics (recyclate from obsolete fishing gear and ropes)

We intend to also make the other parts from recycled plastics as soon as possible

Stay healthy and safe

Bernard MERKX's picture #Citizens&Living
Bernard MERKX, CEO, owner at GreenWavePlastics, posted

Oceanic Face shields

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Personal protection products made with high plastic recycling content (all green parts) Other parts still work in progress

Bernard MERKX's picture #Citizens&Living
Bernard MERKX, CEO, owner at GreenWavePlastics, posted

OCEAN (and EAR) SAVERS

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Product made with 100% recycled plastics from the maritime industry (obsolete fishing gear and ropes)

Bernard MERKX's picture #Citizens&Living
Mateusz Jarosiewicz, Founder at Smart Cities Polska, posted

TALENT DISCOVERY IN THE AGE OF SMART CITIES

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At a time of accelerated growth and ubiquity, connectivity technologies like AI and quantum computing allow us to find ourselves anywhere quickly. The most important question to ask is therefore where exactly do we want to be.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9eihAOW6CR8
Some platforms know exactly what series you would like to watch today based on your previous preferences and when to display you an advertisement for a baby chair before you even know that you need one. Imagine that a city knows for you and in real-time who is worth meeting so that you can develop as an expert, and which team needs your key competencies so that you can be hired immediately.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNNF4iw44r8
As we are more conscious of ourselves and our goals, the world is responding to our actions with more synchronicity. It is one basic and very old knowledge based on the concept of the subconscious and selective perception. What’s more, psychology elaborates that the main factor of satisfaction with a certain situation is the set of relationships with the environment and people that suit us best.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeg18Ej9sro
For one good relation set will be a quiet desk and a world of numbers and tables, for the other it will be an energetic communication with others towards an ambitious aim of changing the world. In separated ontologies, those types can be described and classified differently. We are diverse in so many many ways that there is no perfect system that would describe precisely what makes us unique. Nevertheless, some systems are pretty well adjusted, enough to make them a part of our language or part of smart city competencies’ platform, and even to use them to help navigate citizens through activities and events.

In my dream, cities of the future help us adapt the outside world to our deep needs. The main component of a smart city is not a network of external sensors, but a deep radar of our internal needs which looks deep into our psyche and soul. Doesn’t that fit the slogan of the technocratic city?

In our living lab in Wroclaw, we worked with young people on solutions to help them with the new labor market. We tested there the latest achievements of psychology and a new approach to motivation and interpersonal development of young students.

We used our imagination to create a city-wide game that was about defeating the mythical anti-creator by working together to develop creative skills. During the one year process we tried to answer many questions: How to apply the national qualifications framework in an accessible form? Who will be good programmers? Who will never become one? How to change thinking about the city and its role? How to recognize talents at an early stage? How can we build qualities such as leadership, commitment, and entrepreneurship?

Cities need to take immediate action towards mapping and supporting digital and future-proof competencies and approaches.

On the one hand, we helped students get to know each other better, and on the other, internalized with a multilevel transformation of the external world. We used to work on paintings, create our own icons, debate with experts. We also required communication of our own interpersonal discoveries. We created personal websites, business cards, and team presentations. It helps us (and the platform) to understand each one's unique feature and potential roles.

The final stage was to create a small project as a team for one of the local companies or an NGO. Communication with a peer group was just as important as the flow of information with the career adviser and mentors platform. We set up the framework of internal game paths of development and individual competencies.

In the future, artificial intelligence can also be an important player in the ecosystem, so we need to communicate our needs and intentions understandable for its language so that it can help in suggesting the path to achieving our personal goals. We discover that badges and icons can be a great tool to build a common language between different actors. The results of the project evaluation gave outstanding results. Over 60% of people felt closer to the group, which is a good help in the circumstances of growing alienation in the digital and mobile world. Most participants realized their own needs and dreams and made the first step to fulfill them. At the end we replicated and simulated talks with future employer HR, to give a chance to newly acquired competences Our model has been recommended for implementation across the country. However, I feel that hardly anyone in the technology sector understands the importance of soft technologies in the ecosystem of an intelligent country and city.

Even if it is underlined in the newest digital strategies for the EU there is no solution to support mass talent evaluation and constant mapping process. The core element of the Smart Cities Polska vision and strategy is to build smart cities on social capital and supporting it by delivering digital tools for competencies diagnosis and places for meetings and collaboration.

The next stage of our journey will be to conduct an experiment with our living lab on a larger scale and improve the technologies behind the group management and development processes of joint projects. Our new team members will be experts in artificial intelligence, bots, and e-learning platforms. We also want to start international cooperation, hence the translation of our working method into Russian and English.

What I have learned about myself during the project:

The test confirms that I am a participant characteristically (Factor S’) so I want to participate in culture and values, and a technician personality (Factor V’) so I want to gain the know-how to act efficiently. Temperamentally, I am averse to the group (Factor -O) and matter (Factor M) so I act as an independent analyst.

Does my current work fulfill my personal relationship needs?

The role of the coordinator of teams dealing with the development of systems for cities is in line with my social and technical needs. I work on both theoretical models and on occasionally while networking with people. In a living lab environment, I can work with young people so I can meet and recognize my participation needs.

This is a good predictor of satisfaction and harmonic career. Everyone is different, and we need to know how to team up in new teams in a very fast manner by using one language and methodology linked with AI This self-knowledge is enough to precisely match potential roles in the ecosystem and team behavior.

Using the latest methods, it takes less than 15 minutes to see myself structure with great precision. It is easier than quantitative tests based on questions like popular methodology DISC or MBTI, although the results are correlated.

If you would like to improve your city with talent discovery and competencies mapping tool please ask me how we can cooperate: mateusz.jarosiewicz@smartcitiespolska.org

Previously appeared on: https://scgn.smartdubai.ae/social/2020/09/03/mateusz-c0324d40-a052-4503-a113-dfbb12ce3212

Mateusz Jarosiewicz's picture #Citizens&Living
Kerstin Gerlagh, General Manager , posted

#NordicTalks Sustainable Fashion Days 2020 3rd Webinar Free event

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3rd WEBINAR 30 September 2020 | 15:00 – 16:30
WE KNOW NOW.| Awareness raising

We don’t know what we don’t know. Is this however something we can still claim about the secrets of fashion business? We should wear our values – clothes that are sustainably and ethically made, providing also those who make them a decent living.
Quality over quantity. Fashion can be used as a voice of CHANGE. What do you stand for?

Raising transparency, campaigning, social justice, spotlighting solutions and
bright ideas
The environmental impact of fashion
Social impact of fashion – Sweatshops #whomademyclothes #payup
Company values and importance of purpose
Role of campaigns and advertising – using fashion as a force for good

Online event on Sep 30th
maasoome shekofte, urban planning expert , posted

How can we help the people who lives In the slums if no budget is allocated by the government?

hi there everyone,
I am Maasoome, Master of Urban Planning, from Iran.
I work in an office in a rural area that has just joined the city (located in east north of Iran). Our job is to help the people who are living in this area to improve the social and economic situation of their lives. Unfortunately, we have faced the problem of a lack of funds to improve the economic situation of this area by the government.
Can you give me a solution or a new idea to change this situation?
The population of this range is equal to: 15560
Thanks for your attention

maasoome shekofte's picture #Citizens&Living
Dave van Loon, Onderzoeker / adviseur stedelijke vraagstukken at Kennisland, posted

Buurtbudgetten: enthousiasme, maar ook frustratie

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De gemeente Amsterdam werkt aan democratische vernieuwing vanuit de overtuiging dat bewoners zelf het beste weten wat er speelt in de buurt en waar behoefte aan is. Een van de methoden waarmee geëxperimenteerd wordt, is de inzet van buurtbudgetten. In het leerprogramma ‘Amsterdammers, Maak je stad!’ deden Kennisland, Pakhuis de Zwijger en Waag onderzoek naar deze buurtbudgetpilots en recent deelden we de resultaten in een livecast. Wat leert de eerste editie buurtbudgetpilots ons voor de volgende stap naar meer eigenaarschap, zeggenschap en cocreatie in de stad?

In het coalitieakkoord 2018-2022 ‘Een nieuwe lente en een nieuw geluid’ geeft het College van B&W van Amsterdam aan democratisering als een van de speerpunten te zien in de huidige bestuursperiode. De doelstellingen van democratisering zijn het vergroten van het eigenaarschap en de zeggenschap van bewoners en het vergroten van het vertrouwen van bewoners in de gemeente. In dat kader is de gemeente gestart met buurtbudgetten.

De pilots met buurtbudgetten zijn in 2019 in de stadsdelen Noord, Nieuw-West en Zuidoost van start gegaan. De stadsdelen hebben, aangevoerd door hun eigen teams Democratisering, zelf ingevuld op welke manier de budgetten verdeeld worden, waarbij rekening is gehouden met de lokale context van de buurt. In deze drie stadsdelen is met verschillende modellen geëxperimenteerd, van online stemmen tot deliberatieve werksessies.

Reflecteren op alle niveaus
Het huidige stadsbestuur heeft met haar democratiseringsagenda een stevige ambitie neergelegd en is voortvarend aan de slag gegaan met de pilots met als doel om straks in heel de stad met buurtbudgetten te werken. Vanwege deze ambitie is het belangrijk om de participatie van bewoners niet alleen op de korte termijn vorm te geven in experimenten, maar deze nieuwe vormen van participatie en een daarbij passende werkwijze – ook daadwerkelijk in het beleid te verankeren. Dat betekent dat er tijdens de pilots geleerd en gereflecteerd moet worden op alle niveaus: in de praktijk, maar óók ambtelijk en bestuurlijk.

In oktober 2019 zijn Waag, Kennisland en Pakhuis de Zwijger, in samenwerking met en in opdracht van de gemeente Amsterdam daarom van start gegaan met het leerprogramma ‘Amsterdammers, Maak je stad!’. Afgelopen 9 juni presenteerden wij de onderzoeksresultaten van dit leerprogramma in een online bijeenkomst vanuit Pakhuis de Zwijger. We gingen met verschillende betrokken bewoners, ambtenaren en de betrokken wethouder Democratisering Rutger Groot Wassink in gesprek rond de centrale vraag: ‘Wat leert de eerste editie buurtbudgetpilots ons voor de volgende stap naar meer eigenaarschap, zeggenschap en cocreatie in de stad?

Behoefte aan heldere kaders en duurzame samenwerking
In het eerste deel van de bijeenkomst deelde het Maak je Stad!-team de resultaten van het onderzoek naar de eerste ronde buurtbudgetten in Nieuw-West, Zuidoost en Noord. Hieruit blijkt dat zowel bewoners als ambtenaren met heel veel enthousiasme aan de pilots zijn begonnen, maar dat het proces ook veel frustratie heeft opgeleverd. Zo ontbraken belangrijke kaders rondom doelstellingen, rolverdeling, samenwerking, financiering en communicatie bijvoorbeeld. Aan de hand van verhalen van actieve bewoners, lokale democratiseringsprojectleiders en stadsdeelbestuurders werden deze thema’s geïllustreerd en besproken. Zo deelde een van de actieve bewoners in Nieuw-West, initiatiefnemer van Schoon Plein ‘40-’45 haar ervaringen met het buurtbudget:

> “Het enthousiasme van de buurt is groot. Iedereen wil graag een schoon plein. Maar we kijken ook naar de gemeente. De schoonmaak is nog altijd een primaire gemeentelijke taak, maar de samenwerking met de gemeente blijkt complex. De uitdaging is om elkaar te helpen om een schoon plein te realiseren. […] Ondanks het enthousiasme van bewoners en de mogelijkheden die het buurtbudget ons geeft, is het opmerkelijk dat de kosten die we maken tot nu toe door de initiatiefnemers is voorgeschoten. Hier heeft de gemeente helaas nog geen procedure voor opgezet.”

Het Maak je Stad!-team deed een oproep voor het gezamenlijk creëren van heldere doelstellingen en kaders, een duurzame samenwerking tussen bewoners en ambtenaren en het niet te snel afrekenen op resultaten:

> “We hebben gezien dat het van belang is om samen met bewoners belangrijke kaders en afspraken te maken rondom de doelstellingen, rolverdeling, samenwerking, financiering en communicatie van en rondom buurtbudgetten. Maar ook in zo’n stadsbreed kader moet ruimte blijven bestaan voor lokaal maatwerk in de verschillende stadsdelen, omdat de behoeften van bewoners in elke buurt verschillen.”

Op naar een duurzaam lerend netwerk
In het tweede deel van de bijeenkomst keken we samen met Rutger Groot Wassink, wethouder Democratisering en Jacqueline van Loon, directeur van !Woon, vooruit. Hoe kunnen we geleerde lessen meenemen in het vervolg van de buurtbudgetten? Hoe zorgen we voor een duurzaam lerend netwerk in de stad dat samenwerkt aan democratische vernieuwing?

Zowel Van Loon als Groot Wassink pleitten tijdens de bijeenkomst voor meer eigenaarschap en zeggenschap bij verschillende groepen bewoners over het proces van het buurtbudget. Willen we het buurtbudget verdelen door middel van een challenge, door online stemmingen, door het organiseren we overlegtafels of geven we het buurtbudget aan een bewonersplatform? Betrek bewoners dus vanaf het begin en laat hen meebeslissen over hoe het buurtbudget georganiseerd moet worden. En niet pas op het moment dat de wijze waarop bewoners mee kunnen doen al is bedacht. Dit is ook een van de aanbevelingen vanuit het leerprogramma Amsterdammers, Maak je stad!

Groot Wassink gaf aan dat het stadsbestuur de pilots juist gestart heeft om ervan te leren, en bewust veel ruimte heeft gegeven aan allerlei verschillende vormen in de verschillende stadsdelen, zonder al te veel kaders. “Ik heb mensen uiteraard niet bewust willen frustreren, maar het is wel fijn dat we nu zien waar we tegenaan lopen als gemeentelijke organisatie.” De schuring die dit de afgelopen periode heeft opgeleverd en de inzichten uit het onderzoek en het leerprogramma Amsterdammers, Maak je stad! vormen belangrijke input voor een stedelijk kader met richtlijnen voor het buurtbudget dat de gemeente eind 2020 gaat opstellen.
Het volledige onderzoeksrapport met alle resultaten van het leerprogramma wordt binnenkort gepubliceerd. Neem voor meer informatie contact op met Dave van Loon (dl@kl.nl) of kijk op: https://www.kl.nl/nieuws/buurtbudgetten-enthousiasme-maar-ook-frustratie/

Dave van Loon's picture #Citizens&Living
Trey Hahn, Founder , posted

Cycling Experience Masterclass

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This is a masterclass for people-centered cycleway design. Get hands-on experience with human-centered design methods for cycling, experience infrastructure that represents user experience and usability principles in practice, and hear from practitioners in the Netherlands that work on cycling experience.

How would our cities be different if designed from the cyclist's perspective? This masterclass connects theory to both your own personal experience and to professional practice. Amsterdam is the classroom. Get hands-on experience with human-centered design methods for cycling, experience infrastructure that represents user experience and usability principles in practice, and hear from practitioners in the Netherlands that work on cycling experience.

Designing a Bicycle User Experience (BUX) equips professionals and organizations to put people at the center of their design process and make cycling an inclusive practice and experience. We maintain an open toolkit of methods and provide learning opportunities online and in-person.

Trey Hahn's picture Event on Oct 12th
Daniela Guzun, Events Manager , posted

Product Up: The Startup and Scaleup Conference 🇳🇱

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Product Up is a free online conference that is here to help you get the knowledge on what it takes to launch and grow your business! ➡️ https://bit.ly/SC-ProductUp2020

On October 29–30, find out what it means to find the perfect product, engage a buying audience, recruit the team to make it happen and go global, all at Product Up!

Product Up isn't your standard online conference. We want to bring the theatre to YOU and teleport you to a real offline conference atmosphere from the comfort of your own home!

Be a part of our debut on the largest stage and screen in Amsterdam and witness talks, real keynotes, and authentic fireside chats with the greatest entrepreneurial minds on the Dutch and international markets.

We’ll have talks from leaders from Deliveroo, Polarsteps, Picnic, NewMotion, GrowthTribe, What3words, WeAreKeen, PRLab, and many more! Check the lineup at http://bit.ly/ProductUpConferenceLineup

Product Up is your conference, no matter your background or skills, this is the growth event for you!

Daniela Guzun's picture Online event on Oct 29th
Nancy Zikken, Community Manager at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Nice article by MIT Technology Review on the adoption of covid-19 apps

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'The early focus on contact tracing apps for covid-19 was understandable: a vaccine is still many months away, assuming we can even find one that will work. Apps stepped into the breach as a potential panacea—even though many insiders have consistently argued that they are only one of a number of tools we have to fight the virus.'

And are they working? Will people use it? The article shows that France and Australia have some struggles in making the technology work while also trying to get people adopt the app. Eventually, technology will work. Success is however dependent on the willingness of usage by the people.

Join the discussion!
Are you interested in the Dutch plans for a covid-19 contact tracing app? What kind of ideas do they have to enthuse people to use the CoronaMelder? Or would you like to know how other cities and countries convinced people to use such technology? Join us on the 3rd of September 2020 in an online session! More info: https://amsterdamsmartcity.com/events/how-to-get-people-to-actually-use-contact-tracing

Nancy Zikken's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Speaking opportunity at event 'How to Get People to Actually Use Contact Tracing Apps' - 3rd of September

The wait is almost over. On the 1st of September, the Netherlands will launch its own contact tracing app to combat COVID-19. In a few weeks time, all Dutch people will be able to use the Coronamelder. But, are people really waiting for this app? Usage is voluntary, however, it is often said that 60% of the population should use the app to ensure effectiveness. Will 60% of the Dutch install an app? What can the government and other stakeholders do to ensure high rates of adoption? And what lessons can we learn from other countries already using contact-tracing apps? Join the international exchange!

Amsterdam Smart City is organizing a Data Dilemmas event on this topic on the 3rd of September! More information can be found here: https://amsterdamsmartcity.com/events/how-to-get-people-to-actually-use-contact-tracing

Have you been involved in the development, testing or roll-out of a contact-tracing app for covid-19 and would you like to share you experience as a user or professional? Get in touch with Nancy via nancy@amsterdamsmartcity.com with a short explanation on how you would like to contribute to the discussion!

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

How to Get People to Use Contact Tracing Apps

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How to successfully introduce contact tracing apps? Join the discussion!

A**msterdam Smart City - Data Dilemmas event**

In smart city projects, technology is almost never the issue. Success is highly depended on whether people will actually need, use and understand technology. This also goes for the contact tracing apps! How important is the app for governments? How does the app help regular contact tracing? How does it put people in the center of technology? How have their contact-tracing apps been effective? What can your countries learn from each other? How important is it that people will use the app? And what strategies do governments have to enthuse people to use them?

A lot of things to discuss!

The Netherlands will soon launch its own contact tracing app to combat COVID-19. The ‘Coronamelder’ (Corona Reporter) is currently being tested in a beta version. In a few weeks time, all Dutch people will be able to use the Coronamelder. The app is said to play an important role in informing people when they have been directly exposed to someone with COVID-19.

Join us during the upcoming Data Dilemmas event on September 3!

Program:

Date: 3rd of September 2020

Online event

Language: English

15.50: Digital walk-in

16.00 – 16.05: Introduction by Leonie van den Beuken, program director Amsterdam Smart City

16.05 – 16.45: Presentations + Q&A

Including:

- Ivo Jansch, developer of the CoronaMelder app at the Dutch Ministry of Health

- Hilleen Smeets, member of the prevention team at the Municipal Health Service (GGD) Amsterdam.

- Gar Mac Críosta - project manager/lead for the Irish Covid-Tracker-App at the Chief Information Office of Ireland Health Service

- Eivind Arvesen, previous member expert panel evaluating the Norwegian contact tracing app

- Hannes Grasegger - journalist from Switzerland

16.45 – 17.15: Plenary discussion and wrap-up

17.15 – 17.30: Digital drinks

About the Data Dilemmas series

The contact tracing app is an example that shows possibilities of data and new technologies for urban challenges are endless. We use data to make cities safer, cleaner and, for example, more accessible. But what happens to all the data that is collected? Which choices did people make and why? D**o we really need the data in all cases? Which dilemmas can be encountered? Which other considerations play a role? These questions are important for everyone; for governments, residents and companies. Amsterdam Smart City would like to explore with you which decisions are needed for responsible use of data. Data Dilemmas is a collaboration between Amsterdam Smart City and the City of Amsterdam’s Datalab.

Amsterdam Smart City's picture Online event on Sep 3rd