#Data

Topic within Digital City
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

5. Collect meaningful data and stay away from dataism

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The fifth episode of the series Better cities: The role of technology is about the sense and nonsense of big data. Data is the new oil is the worst cliché of the big data hype yet. Even worse than data-driven policy. In this article, I investigate - with digital twins as a thread - what the contribution of data can be to urban policy and how dataism, a religion that takes over policy making itself, can be prevented (must read: Harari: Homo Deus).

I am a happy user of a Sonos sound system. Nevertheless, the helpdesk must be involved occasionally. Recently, it knew within five minutes that my problem was the result of a faulty connection cable between the modem and the amplifier. As it turned out, the helpdesk was able to remotely generate a digital image of the components of my sound system and their connections and saw that the cable in question was not transmitting any signal. A simple example of a digital twin. I was happy with it. But where is the line between the sense and nonsense of collecting masses of data?

What is a digital twin.

A digital twin is a digital model of an object, product, or process. In my training as a social geographer, I had a lot to do with maps, the oldest form of 'twinning'. Maps have laid the foundation for GIS technology, which in turn is the foundation of digital twins. Geographical information systems relate data based on geographical location and provide insight into their coherence in the form of a model. If data is permanently connected to reality with the help of sensors, then the dynamics in the real world and those in the model correspond and we speak of a 'digital twin'. Such a dynamic model can be used for simulation purposes, monitoring and maintenance of machines, processes, buildings, but also for much larger-scale entities, for example the electricity grid.

From data to insight

Every scientist knows that data is indispensable, but also that there is a long way to go before data leads to knowledge and insight. That road starts even before data is collected. The first step is assumptions about the essence of reality and thus the method of knowing it. There has been a lot of discussion about this within the philosophy of science, from which two points of view have been briefly crystallized, a systems approach and a complexity approach.

The systems approach assumes that reality consists of a stable series of actions and reactions in which law-like connections can be sought. Today, almost everyone assumes that this only applies to physical and biological phenomena. Yet there is also talk of social systems. This is not a question of law-like relationships, but of generalizing assumptions about human behavior at a high level of aggregation. The homo economicus is a good example. Based on such assumptions, conclusions can be drawn about how behavior can be influenced.

The complexity approach sees (social) reality as the result of a complex adaptive process that arises from countless interactions, which - when it comes to human actions - are fed by diverse motives. In that case it will be much more difficult to make generic statements at a high level of aggregation and interventions will have a less predictable result.

Traffic models

Traffic policy is a good example to illustrate the distinction between a process and a complexity approach. Simulation using a digital twin in Chattanooga of the use of flexible lane assignment and traffic light phasing showed that congestion could be reduced by 30%. Had this experiment been carried out, the result would probably have been very different. Traffic experts note time and again that every newly opened road becomes full after a short time, while the traffic picture on other roads hardly changes. In econometrics this phenomenon is called induced demand. In a study of urban traffic patterns between 1983 and 2003, economists Gilles Duranton and Matthew Turner found that car use increases proportionally with the growth of road capacity. The cause only becomes visible to those who use a complexity approach: Every road user reacts differently to the opening or closing of a road. That reaction can be to move the ride to another time, to use a different road, to ride with someone else, to use public transport or to cancel the ride.

Carlos Gershenson, a Mexican computer specialist, has examined traffic behavior from a complexity approach and he concludes that self-regulation is the best way to tackle congestion and to maximize the capacity of roads. If the simulated traffic changes in Chattanooga had taken place in the real world, thousands of travelers would have changed their driving behavior in a short time. They had started trying out the smart highway, and due to induced demand, congestion there would increase to old levels in no time. Someone who wants to make the effect of traffic measures visible with a digital twin should feed it with results of research into the induced demand effect, instead of just manipulating historical traffic data.

The value of digital twins

Digital twins prove their worth when simulating physical systems, i.e. processes with a parametric progression. This concerns, for example, the operation of a machine, or in an urban context, the relationship between the amount of UV light, the temperature, the wind (speed) and the number of trees per unit area. In Singapore, for example, digital twins are being used to investigate how heat islands arise in the city and how their effect can be reduced. Schiphol Airporthas a digital twin that shows all moving parts at the airport, such as roller conveyors and stairs. This enables technicians to get to work immediately in the event of a malfunction. It is impossible to say in advance whether the costs of building such a model outweigh the benefits. Digital twins often develop from small to large, driven by proven needs.

Boston also developed a digital twin of part of the city in 2017, with technical support from ESRI. A limited number of processes have been merged into a virtual 3D model. One is the shadowing caused by the height of buildings. One of the much-loved green spaces in the city is the Boston Common. For decades, it has been possible to limit the development of high-rise buildings along the edges of the park and thus to limit shade. Time and again, project developers came up with new proposals for high-rise buildings. With the digital twin, the effect of the shadowing of these buildings can be simulated in different weather conditions and in different seasons (see image above). The digital twin can be consulted online, so that everyone can view these and other effects of urban planning interventions at home.

Questions in advance

Three questions precede the construction of a digital twin, and data collection in general. In the first place, what the user wants to achieve with it, then which processes will be involved and thirdly, which knowledge is available of these processes and their impact. Chris Andrews, an urban planner working on the ESRI ArcGIS platform, emphasizes the need to limit the number of elements in a digital twin and to pre-calculate the relationship between them: To help limit complexity, the number of systems modeled in a digital twin should likely be focused on the problems the twin will be used to solve.

Both the example of traffic forecasts in Chattanooga, the formation of heat islands in Singapore and the shadowing of the Boston Common show that raw data is insufficient to feed a digital twin. Instead, data are used that are the result of scientific research, after the researcher has decided whether a systems approach or a complexity approach is appropriate. In the words of Nigel Jacob, former Chief Technology Officer in Boston: For many years now, we've been talking about the need to become data-driven… But there's a step beyond that. We need to make the transition to being science-driven in ...... It's not enough to be data mining to look for patterns. We need to understand root causes of issues and develop policies to address these issues.

Digital twins are valuable tools. But if they are fed with raw data, they provide at best insight into statistical connections and every scientist knows how dangerous it is to draw conclusions from that: Trash in, trash out.

If you prefer the Dutch version of the Better cities series, find an overview of the already published episodes via the link below.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Marjan Schrama, posted

The State of the Region 2021

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Did you already register for State of the Region 2021?

State of the Region is the annual event of the Metropolitan Region Amsterdam , Amsterdam Economy, Amsterdam Economic Board and amsterdam&partners in which we take a look at the joint challenges, the strength and the capacity of our region. The central theme this year is ‘Investing in the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area’. Listen to the speech of the Mayor of Amsterdam, the challenging labourmarket and a keynote about the future of the city. See you the 10th of february at 15:45!
(*event is in Dutch, the keynote is English spoken).

Marjan Schrama's picture Online event on Dec 10th
Teska Drosten, Communicator at Waag, posted

Waag presenteert: Code voor Kinderrechten

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In opdracht van het Ministerie van Binnenlandse Zaken heeft Waag samen met de Universiteit Leiden, jongeren, ontwerpers, ontwikkelaars en andere experts de Code voor Kinderrechten ontwikkeld. Hoe kunnen we in de toekomst technologie ontwerpen in het belang van kinderen en jongeren? Praat en ontwerp mee tijdens het publieksprogramma van Code voor Kinderrechten op donderdag 9 december.

meld je aan

Digitale technologie is alom vertegenwoordigd in het leven van kinderen en jongeren en het levert een waardevolle bijdrage aan hun ontwikkeling. Maar de praktijk wijst uit dat in het ontwerp van technologie ook keuzes worden gemaakt die niet in het belang zijn van kinderen. Zo wordt het veelgebruikte platform TikTok beschuldigd voor het op onrechtmatige wijze verzamelen en doorverkopen van gebruikersgegevens van kinderen. Ook zijn er apps die wel door kinderen en jongeren gebruikt worden, maar niet met- en voor de doelgroep zijn ontworpen.

In opdracht van het Ministerie van Binnenlandse Zaken heeft Waag samen met de Universiteit Leiden, jongeren, ontwerpers, ontwikkelaars en andere experts de Code voor Kinderrechten ontwikkeld. De Code voor Kinderrechten bestaat uit tien beginselen met praktische voorbeelden, waarmee ontwerpers en ontwikkelaars de fundamentele rechten van kinderen kunnen waarborgen in digitale diensten.

Tijdens het publieksprogramma op donderdag 9 december gaan we in gesprek met tech-ontwikkelaars, ontwerpers, ouders en partijen die keuzes maken over technologie voor kinderen. We praten over de huidige dilemma’s in het ontwerpen van (de juiste) technologie voor kinderen. Maar ook gaan we gezamenlijk op zoek naar oplossingen aan de hand van de Code voor Kinderrechten.

meld je aan

Programma:
19:00 uur - Welkom door Ministerie van Binnenlandse Zaken
19:15 uur - Introductie Code voor Kinderrechten door Simone van der Hof, hoogleraar Recht en de Informatiemaatschappij aan de Universiteit Leiden
19:30 uur - Workshop ‘ontwerp in het belang van het kind’
20:30 uur - Afsluitende borrel

cvk campagne

Over de Code voor Kinderrechten
Kinderrechten moeten waarborgen dat kinderen voldoende vrijheid hebben om zich te ontwikkelen en mee te doen in de maatschappij, terwijl ze worden beschermd tegen mogelijk schadelijke invloeden, zoals misbruik en verslaving. Participatie van kinderen vindt steeds vaker plaats met behulp van digitale diensten. Het is daarom belangrijk dat deze diensten op een kindvriendelijke wijze zijn ontworpen.

De Code voor Kinderrechten biedt handvatten die helpen om de rechten van kinderen te begrijpen en toe te passen bij de ontwikkeling van een digitale dienst. Alle beginselen zijn te herleiden naar de fundamentele rechten van kinderen in het VN Verdrag inzake de Rechten van het Kind 1989 (IVRK). Verder zijn de beginselen gebaseerd op wet- en regelgeving. De beginselen zijn op zichzelf weliswaar geen juridisch afdwingbare regels, maar de onderliggende wet- en regelgeving is wel juridisch bindend.

Meer lezen?

Bekijk de Code voor Kinderrechten blogserie

Teska Drosten's picture Online event on Dec 9th
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

CityFlows is Looking for International Crowd-Management Innovations & Best Practices

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The EIT-KIC project CityFlows aims to improve the liveability of crowded pedestrian spaces through the use of Crowd Monitoring Decision Support Systems (CM-DSS) to manage pedestrian flows.  Amsterdam, Milan and Barcelona are the three CityFlows project test sites  where various innovative crowd monitoring techniques will be evaluated in real-life settings.  These tests will take place where large crowds meet, such as mass events, tourist spaces and transfer hubs.  The CityFlows project also prepares a CM-DSS for market launch which incorporates state-of-the-art monitoring techniques.

One of the goals of the CityFlows project is to build a community of crowd-management researchers and practitioners which supports knowledge sharing between the various stakeholders. To this end, in 2020 we hosted a webinar series focused on knowledge sharing.

Now, we are putting out an open call for crowd-management best practices and are looking to collect international best practices.

Do you have a crowd-management solution or project which you would like to showcase to peers, policy makers and the public?

We invite all stakeholders, including public authorities, companies, start-ups, and knowledge institutions to share their crowd-management innovations and lessons learned.

A selection of the cases will be featured in a “Best Practices for Crowd-management” digital showcase.

Submitting your crowd-management solution / project is possible via this short form by providing answers to the following questions:

  1. What crowd-management technologies were deployed in the project?
  2. How did you turn data into actionable information? What key insights were gained from the project and how did this help improve managing crowds?
  3. How did you deal with privacy and other ethical challenges in your project?
  4. What were the main challenges encountered and how did you overcome them?
  5. What are the most important transferable lessons learned (positive or negative) from the project? What can other cities / stakeholders learn from this experience?

Deadline
Please complete submission by 18:00 on Friday, December 10th.

More information
For questions and more information about this call for solutions please contact:

Cornelia Dinca's picture #DigitalCity
Daniela Guzun, Events Manager at Hyperion Lab, posted

Expertise Day- All the advice you need to Ai-ccelerate!

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Expertise Day: All the advice you need to AI-ccelerate. For startups, entrepreneurs, aspiring founders. For the AI community!

🗓 On December 9, Hyperion Lab and Women in AI Netherlands bring you all the experts you need to build and accelerate your AI#HPC, or deeplearning startup for one whole day!

📝 Subsidies, cloud computing, sales, investment readiness, startup enablement, IP law, hiring, community building, you name it!

🧑🏾‍💻 👩🏻‍💻Learn from experts such as Sanin Saracevic from Maestral Solutions, Inc.Maarten Robbers from Ugoo B.V.David Power from EscherCloudMaurice Beckand Verwee from Curiosity, Kyra Dresen from Volta VenturesMargriet Larmit from ROM InWest, Holger Seitz from EP&C, Michael Koenka from Koenka & PartnersOliviana Bailey from Women in AI Netherlands & EscherCloud.

Register your online or offline attendance for any of the sessions.

Daniela Guzun's picture Masterclass / workshop on Dec 9th
Jet van Eeghen, Online communications advisor at Amsterdam Economic Board, posted

AMdEX Meetup over delen van sensor data op Marineterrein

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Vanwege de nieuwe corona-regelgeving houden we op 2 december een online bijeenkomst via Zoom vanaf 16.30 uur. We geven je in korte tijd zoveel mogelijk informatie over hoe het gaat met AMdEX (Amsterdam Data Exchange) en de samenwerking met het Marineterrein. Zij willen de data, afkomstig uit de sensoren op het terrein, delen met geïnteresseerden. Natuurlijk moet dat wel op een manier die veilig en vertrouwd is.

Programma

- Welkom en introductie AMdEX – Willem Koeman (Amsterdam Economic Board)
- AMdEX, een vertrouwd grid voor het delen van data – Hayo Schreijer (deXes)
- Marineterrein Sensor Data: AMdEX en het Marineterrein werken samen aan het delen van sensordata – Tom van Arman (Tapp)
- AMdEX beleid – hoe dwing je regels digitaal af rondom het gebruik van (gevoelige) data af? – Thomas van Binsbergen (UvA)
- Q&A

Neem deel aan dit event via Zoom. Je bent welkom op 2 december om 16:30 uur.

Achtergrondinformatie

AMdEX (Amsterdam Data Exchange) is een open coalitie van bedrijven en onderzoeksinstellingen die samen een open en vertrouwde infrastructuur voor het delen van gegevens ontwerpen en ontwikkelen. De coalitie wil de overgang naar een eerlijke en vertrouwde digitale economie versnellen waarin individuen en organisaties de volledige controle hebben over hun gegevens.

Data: een belofte voor het leven in de stad. Data stellen ons in staat om de grote uitdagingen van moderne steden aan te pakken en ze schoner, veiliger en gezonder te maken. Helaas is toegang tot deze gegevens niet zo eenvoudig als het lijkt. Wie wil bedrijfsgevoelige data delen met een concurrent? Of privacygevoelige data? Door onzekerheid over veiligheid, privacy en data-eigendom wordt minder dan 1% van alle data daadwerkelijk gebruikt, gedeeld en geanalyseerd.

Jet van Eeghen's picture Meet-up on Dec 2nd
Liza Verheijke, Community Manager at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

HvA, HR and HU building the centre for Responsible Applied AI

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The Amsterdam, Rotterdam and Utrecht Universities of Applied Sciences have received a SPRONG grant from Regieorgaan-SIA, with which they - together with 24 partners from the field - can build an infrastructure for a powerful research group. A group that is regionally and nationally recognised as the centre for practice-based research in the field of Responsible Applied AI.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is developing rapidly with far-reaching consequences for the whole of society (all sectors, professions and citizens). Although AI offers new opportunities for institutions and (SME) companies, there are also many questions.

For example, there is a demand for research methods to meaningfully implement AI technology in a specific context (e.g. retail and care), taking into account the user and other stakeholders. There are also questions about the design process of AI solutions: how can you take ethical and social issues into account?

METHODOLOGY FOR RESPONSIBLE APPLIED AI

Current AI research is mostly fundamental and focused on technology. As such, it hardly provides answers to the questions mentioned above. The three universities of applied sciences in the SPRONG group conduct practice-oriented research into responsible AI solutions for companies and institutions. With these research experiences and results, the SPRONG group aims to develop a Responsible Applied AI methodology that helps to design, develop and implement responsible AI solutions.

CO-CREATION IN HYBRID LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

To develop this methodology, knowledge building and sharing is needed, which the universities of applied sciences develop together with companies and organisations. The starting point of the project is the development of three hybrid learning environments around the application areas of retail, business services and media. AI developers, problem owners, end users, researchers and students work together in these environments.

The goal is to develop practical tools, instruments, education and training from the learning environment that can be widely used for the application of AI in the relevant sector. Each learning environment is linked to specific courses of the participating universities and practical partners who contribute to the programme. During the SPRONG programme, the number of application areas will be expanded and, where possible, scaled up nationally.

SUPPORTING INFRASTRUCTURE

A central supporting infrastructure will be developed, including processes and facilities for data management and strategic human resource management, an IT infrastructure, training courses and an impact model.

GET TO KNOW OUR PARTNERS IN THE FIELD

Liza Verheijke's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Recap of our event ‘Data Centres: Taking the Bitter with the Sweet’ from 28th of October

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On the 28th of October 2021 Amsterdam Smart City and Datalab hosted an international event on the costs and benefits of accommodating data centres. Together with partners we discussed the complexity of the weighing of these aspects and the management by future policies.

The digitization of our society produces an exponentially increasing amount of data, which causes an increased need for data centres and connectivity. In 2030, there is expected to see a twenty-fold increase in data traffic, consuming 5% of worldwide electricity at that point. A recent report in the Netherlands has shown quite some hesitance on whether or not the foreseen rise in data centres in The Netherlands is the right way to go.

Lots of reasons to shed some international perspectives on these issues. What are current datacentre strategies? How are datacenters driving economic value? And how can the digital economy become more sustainable? Check out the presentations and discussions in the video!

Speakers:
• Wout Rensink (Policy advisor Economic Affairs at Province of Noord-Holland)
• Thomas Moran (Technology and Sustainability Strategist at Lumen & techUK)
• Daan Terpstra (Director of Policy & Regulatory Affairs · Sustainable Digital Infrastructure Alliance (SDIA))

Moderator:
- Jeroen Sipman, liaison at Amsterdam Smart City

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Daniela Guzun, Events Manager at Hyperion Lab, posted

fAiL Day - learn how to succeed better

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You are invited to join the Hyperion Lab Community of AI & HPC startups, experts, innovators for the fAiL Day on November 18th to learn how to succeed better.

Time& place:
November 18, 2-6pm
Hyperion Lab HQ: Laarderhoogtweg 18, 1101 EA Amsterdam

Format
The event is formatted in a "fishbowl" discussion with 4 pre-selected speakers, a moderator, and an open seat for other participants to actively join the conversation.
All other participants are seated in the outer circle(s) to listen and observe.

Content
Topics will include “So your pilot worked, but implementation failed” and “So you want to implement AI, but…” with confirmed AI leaders and businesses managers like Jörgen Sandig, ex CEO of Scyfer; Kary Chen, Corporate Innovation Risk Officer at ING; and

Each topic will have 30 minutes and a 10 minute break in between for coffee, snacks and networking. The fishbowl discussions will end at 17:00 and all participants are welcome to stay for networking and drinks.

Who to expect
An intimate group of 40 participants ranging from corporate innovation managers, data scientists, AI experts, AI startups, and business transformation leaders.

Attendance
If you want to attend, share your interest at https://events.hyperionlab.nl/failday, and the Lab team will confirm your participation.

Daniela Guzun's picture Meet-up on Nov 18th
Jacqueline Kim, Student at UC Berkeley , posted

Data Science Student Opportunities

Hello!

I am a fourth year student at UC Berkeley studying data science and sustainable design. I currently live in Berkeley, California but am taking some time off to live in Amsterdam from January 2022 - May 2022. I am interested in volunteer/part-time work opportunities in data analytics for smart cities, given Amsterdam's impressive internet of things ecosystem. I am a motivated, hard worker with the ability to learn new things quickly, and am curious about many topics. Please let me know if there are any positions that are open to a person in my position, thank you!

Jacqueline Kim's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Speakers confirmed for event ‘Data Centres: Taking the Bitter with the Sweet’!

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On the 28th of October, Amsterdam Smart City, together with the Province of North Holland and Datalab, will discuss the costs and benefits of accommodating data centres, the complexity of the weighing of these aspects, and how future policies could manage these. We will put the complexity in an international perspective.

Why would you need data centers in your region? What are reasons to refuse them on territories? What are the dilemmas and how do cities in Europe deal with this? We can now confirm the speakers for the event!

Wout Rensink – Province of North Holland
The Province of North Holland is developing a policy on data centres, with which they try to take a first step in minimizing the impact of data centres. The Province ensures that data centres generate their own sustainable energy, the residual heat (in the environment) is used, circular design is applied in the development of buildings which blend into the landscape and that the data centres are leaders in terms of energy and innovation. The man for the job? Wout Rensink! He is the Province’s policy advisor who will try and achieve these goals with other governmental institutions and the industry itself.

Thomas Moran – techUK
Beside his job as the Senior Lead Technology Strategist for Lumen, Thomas is the vice chair of the Climate Strategy and Resilience Council for techUK, which is the largest European trade group representing the technology industry. They support the UK national, regional and local governments in formulating policy around all things technology related, including data centres and infrastructure. He will provide us with the point of view and insights from another part of the FLAP-region: London.

Daan Terpstra – SDI Alliance
After years of working on sustainable energy projects at Vattenfall, Daan Terpstra has joined SDI Alliance last year to try and move the digital infrastructure sector to sustainability by 2030. As the new Director of Policy and Regulatory Affairs, Daan can provide a view on future international digital infrastructure policies in Europe. SDI Alliance has derived a number of fundamental positions, beliefs and principles with which they hope to ensure the development of a vibrant European digital economy, without consuming unsustainable levels of resources.

The session will be moderated by Jeroen Sipman from Amsterdam Smart City.

Rewatch! Find the video of the event here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2f7q_9UxUM

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Manon den Dunnen, Strategisch specialist digitaal , posted

Digital Twins & Asset tracking

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2 great speakers at Sensemakers'monthly meetup;

- Armando Lucrecio (Sr. TechnIcal Program Manager @Amazon) on indoor and outdoor asset tracking;
- Aris Witteborg (Leading Professional Digital Smart Water at Royal HaskoningDHV Digital) on Digital Twins

Manon den Dunnen's picture Meet-up on Nov 17th
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

International Data Dilemmas - Data Centres: Taking the Bitter with the Sweet

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**Check out the recap of the event here: https://amsterdamsmartcity.com/updates/news/recap-of-our-event-data-centres-taking-the-bitter-with-the-sweet-from-28th-of-october

The digitization of our society produces an exponentially increasing amount of data, which causes an increased need for data centres and connectivity. In 2030, there is expected to see a twenty-fold increase in data traffic, consuming 5% of worldwide electricity at that point. A recent report in the Netherlands has shown quite some hesitance on whether or not the foreseen rise in data centres in The Netherlands is the right way to go.

Some say data centres take up precious space, require quite some of our (green) energy and (drinking) water, and they would not create much direct employment either. The report showed that the connectivity and availability of data centres in The Netherlands at this moment would suffice for the Dutch market, as it only uses about a third of their capacity.

Critics were quick to respond and argued the economic value of accommodating data centres for big data-driven industries. Not only the economic value of high-connectivity data centres is worth mentioning, but also the security and ownership of our (European) data is a factor worth mentioning. While the demand for connectivity and data use is rising, it is necessary to prepare for decision making that takes these aspects into account. And the Netherlands, of course, is not the only country to have to do so!

In this international session of Data Dilemmas we invite you to talk about the costs and benefits of accommodating data centres, the complexity of the weighing of these aspects, and how future policies could manage these.

Program: Online event
Date: 28th of October 2021
Language: English

15.50: Digital walk-in
16.00 – 16.05: Introduction by Amsterdam Smart City & Datalab
16.05 – 16.10: Introduction to challenge
16.10 – 17.00: Presentations + Q&A
17.00 – 17.20: Plenary discussion and wrap-up

Speakers:

  • Wout Rensink (Province of Noord-Holland)
  • Thomas Moran (techUK)
  • Daan Terpstra (SDI Alliance)

**Check out the recap of the event here: https://amsterdamsmartcity.com/updates/news/recap-of-our-event-data-centres-taking-the-bitter-with-the-sweet-from-28th-of-october

***About the Data Dilemmas series***
The increasing need for data centres shows the speed at which the digitalization of our environment is growing, as the possibilities of using data and new technologies to address big transitional challenges are endless. We use the data to make cities safer, cleaner and more accessible. But do we really need the data in all cases? What happens to all the data that is collected? Which choices did people make and why? Which dilemmas can be encountered? These questions are important for everyone; for governments, knowledge institutions, residents and companies. Amsterdam Smart City likes to explore with you which decisions are needed for responsible use of data. Data Dilemmas is a collaboration between Amsterdam Smart City and the City of Amsterdam’s Datalab.

Amsterdam Smart City's picture Online event on Oct 28th
Joppe van Driel, Circular economy at AMS Institute, posted

Vacature AMS: programma ontwikkelaar "De Ideale Monitor"

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Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS Institute) zoekt een programma ontwikkelaar met passie voor duurzaamheid & data. Een verbinder, die mensen en inhoud kan samenbrengen, en onderzoek kan koppelen aan maatschappij.

Wil jij bijdragen aan het ontwikkelen van de monitoring en sturing van de duurzaamheidsdoelstellingen van Amsterdam, en wil je opereren op het snijvlak van beleid, maatschappij en data-gedreven onderzoek?

AMS Institute werkt samen met de gemeente Amsterdam en andere partners in de MRA aan het monitoren en meten van de verschillende duurzaamheidsdoelstellingen van de stad. Denk aan energietransitie, circulaire economie, klimaatadaptatie, mobiliteit, donuteconomie. Het AMS Institute en de gemeente slaan de handen in elkaar om alle doelen, indicatoren en projecten in kaart te brengen, hun vooruitgang te meten en te identificeren waar de grootste potenties tot verbetering zitten.

Wij zoeken een ambitieuze en proactieve projectleider om dit meerjarig programma te leiden. Je werkt mee aan een van de grootste en vooruitstrevende initiatieven op het gebied van monitoring en sturing van de duurzame stad; een mooie kans om impact te maken.

Joppe van Driel's picture #Citizens&Living
FLOOR HvA, Marketing en Communicatie van FLOOR Cultureel Platform HvA at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

Digitaliseringspubquiz met Marleen Stikker

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Welke Trump-tweet is echt en welke is nep? Hoeveel MB aan datasporen laten we per persoon dagelijks achter? En herken jij de deepfake-video? Dit soort vragen komen voorbij bij de digitaliseringspubquiz op donderdag 7 oktober. Een uur lang testen we jouw kennis over jouw digitale leven. En zoals het bij een pubquiz hoort: de bar is open (voor een gratis drankje).

Speel mee met de grote digitaliseringsquiz op donderdag 7 oktober! Kunstenaar Roos Groothuizen ontwerpt speciaal voor FLOOR een pubquiz met allerlei vragen over je digitale leven, social media, privacy en meer. Dus ben jij die tech-savvy eindbaas en denk je deze quiz met gemak uit te kunnen spelen, of ben je nog maar bij level 1 en heb je nog wel wat digital skills op te doen? Meld je dan snel aan! En o ja, Marleen Stikker - HvA Professor of Practice the all seeing eye voor digitalisering – kijkt toe.

Hoe werkt het?

Bemachtig snel een plekje door je aan te melden via onderstaand formulier. Tijdens de quiz speelt iedereen in feite netjes alleen. Maar vals spelen mag! Dus wil je als team meespelen, zorg dan dat iedereen zich aanmeldt via het formulier. Kom op de dag zelf op tijd, bemachtig een tafeltje met je team en sleep die digiprijzen in de wacht!

Programma

16:00 – 16:30 Inloop en registratie
16:30 – 16:40 Introductie van Marleen Stikker
16:40 – 17:25 Quiz
17:25 – 17:30 Prijsuitreiking
17:30 – 18:00 Borrel

Toegang is gratis, meld je aan via de link hieronder.

Masterclass / workshop on Oct 7th
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Sign up for the Dutch trade mission to the Smart City Expo in Barcelona

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Smart City Expo World Congress (SCEWC) is the international leading event for cities held in Barcelona since 2011. The mission is to empower cities and collectivize urban innovation across the globe. Through promoting social innovation, establishing partnerships and identifying business opportunities, the event is dedicated to creating a better future for cities and their citizens.

The Netherlands will join the Expo with a trade mission. Dutch companies working in the smart city field are welcome to join a business event with The Nordics, get a role in the program on the Expo, contribute to matchmaking events and join a big amount of other side events!

Be quick and sign up for this trade mission before the 7th of October!

Not a company, but planning to go to Barcelona for knowledge exchange, inspiration and networking? Let us know! There will be programs for non-companies as well!

More information about the Smart City Expo: https://www.smartcityexpo.com/the-event/
More information about the Dutch trade mission to the Smart City Expo: https://www.rvo.nl/actueel/evenementen/smart-city-missie-naar-smart-city-expo-world-congress-barcelona

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #Mobility
Beth Njeri, Digital Communications Manager at Metabolic, posted

How the public sector can use DLTs for good

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Distributed Ledger Technologies have a lot of potential "as a visible tool that improves the lives of citizens and their communities" and the focus should be on the concrete problems that the public sector faces in delivering services to citizens

“You’re going to have to say, it improves mobility, it improves the fight against climate change, affordable housing, a better city, better participation. It’s not going to be about DLTs.” - Francesca Bria, president of the Italian National Innovation Fund

Metabolic concluded the DLT4EU program in May with the goal to drive innovation in the public sector by connecting the expertise of top-notch entrepreneurs with real-world problems, to create new solutions.

Learn more from the link below.

Beth Njeri's picture #DigitalCity
Naomi van Stralen, Msc Student Industrial Design Engineering at University of Twente, posted

Data Transparency in Public Space

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Amsterdam, the Netherlands (and virtually) October 6-7

Cities have increasingly been collecting and analyzing data generated from sensors in public space. This conference will explore how data collecting capabilities and uses are made available (and understandable) to the general public.

AMS Institute’s Responsible Sensing Lab and the NWO funded research group BRIDE (BRIdging Data in the built Environment) are coming together to co-host a conference on data transparency in public space.

Scholars, legal experts, city planners, citizens, data scientists, and students will come together to better understand:

  1. The global legal status of data transparency in public space
  2. How data transparency works in practice
  3. Prototypes and ideas for the future based on the needs of the general public and corporate/governmental stakeholders.

Interested in attending?
Get your tickets at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/data-transparency-in-public-space-tickets-166607410249

Keynote speakers

Beryl Dreijer - Amsterdam Privacy Officer

Alec Shuldiner - Autodesk Data Ethics Lead

Thijs Turèl - AMS Program Manager Responsible Urban Digitalization

Workshops

Planned workshops and times. Scheduling is still subject to change. It is possible to attend multiple workshops.

Digital Trust for Places and Routines (DTPR) - Enabling greater transparency and civic dialogue on the use of digital technologies in the built environment. October 6, afternoon

Discover the smart sensors of Amsterdam - and beyond, when joining virtually. October 6, afternoon

Over the wall designing - Explore what smart objects mean to different groups of people through completing a design process from different perspectives. October 7, afternoon

For more information about the speakers and workshops go to:
www.utwente.nl/en/bms/bride/DTPS2021/

Naomi van Stralen's picture Conference from Oct 6th to Oct 7th
NEMO Science Museum, posted

Event: Privacycafé

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Wat zijn de beste privacy-instellingen voor jouw apparaten? Hoe onthoud je al je wachtwoorden? En wat zijn de beste trucs om zo min mogelijke persoonlijke data te delen? In deze workshop ontdek je hoe je je eigen smartphone of laptop instelt zodat je privacy zo goed mogelijk gewaarborgd blijft.

NEMO Science Museum's picture Meet-up on Oct 2nd
NEMO Science Museum, posted

Exhibition: Bits of You

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Exhibition: Bits of You

The Studio presents the Bits of You exhibition. This new exhibition, which is intended for adult audiences, conveys a sense of how our lives are being impacted by the data traces we leave behind each and every day. It also shows how this differs from one person to another.

Step by step, the exhibition’s six pavilions will give you a sense of how our data is processed by algorithms to generate a range of predictions about our identity and behaviour. Immerse yourself in a vortex of data rings, browse through a gender recognition algorithm, develop a feel for the subtle impact of digital profiles, and get a glimpse of a data-driven future. Encounter ten people who each describe a different data experience, then ask yourself ‘Do I really resemble my digital profile?’.

NEMO Science Museum's picture #DigitalCity