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Roy Cremers, Development , posted

Futureproof. Support a future for Amsterdam makers

Futureproof is a follow-up to the ‘Snelloket for Corona Projects’ that the Amsterdam Funds for the Arts (AFK) launched in April this year in collaboration with the municipality of Amsterdam (Art and Culture, Digital City, Event Fund). €300,000 was made available and this budget was spent in no time.

That is why AFK once again made budget available to re-open its digital ‘Snelloket’ counter. However, this is not enough and that is why AFK now appeals to the valiancy and compassion of all culture lovers and everyone with a heart for Amsterdam.

The Amsterdam Fund for the Arts is a unique city fund. It has been committed to contributing to a diverse and vibrant cultural climate in the city of Amsterdam since 1972. The AFK has never called on the public to contribute. Up until now.

Due to the emergency in which many visual and performing artists currently find themselves, we are compelled to act. We are determined to offer Amsterdam and its makers more perspective.

INVEST IN OUR FUTURE. TOGETHER WE MAKE AMSTERDAM AND ITS MAKERS FUTURE-PROOF

https://www.voordekunst.nl/futureproof

Roy Cremers's picture #Citizens&Living
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

International monitor of urban approaches dealing with COVID-19

Every two weeks the City of Amsterdam publishes a monitor on urban measures to deal with COVID-19. Different issues are discussed, depending on the questions we receive from within the municipal organization. It is aimed at giving a general overview of urban measures worldwide and of other information relevant for cities. It also has an overview of EU measures and of different relevant sources. Please find the 8th version of the monitor attached.
For more information about the measures in Amsterdam, please refer to this website. Earlier versions of the monitor are available through this weblink.
For any suggestions, please mail to internationaloffice@amsterdam.nl. Please refer to the same e-mail address if you would like to subscribe to this mailing.

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #Citizens&Living
Herman van den Bosch, Curator at Amsterdam Smart City; professor in management education , posted

Affordable cities

is the title of my newest blogpost about - yes- the lack of affordability of cities (Amsterdam included).
However, if you have no proficiency of Dutch, you must wait a couple of weeks; only the Dutch version is available now. Try it.....

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Citizens&Living
Herman van den Bosch, Curator at Amsterdam Smart City; professor in management education , posted

The new commons: Empowering citizens

In a time that empowering citizens is hot, you might consider reading the seminal book of Elinor Ostrom, Governing the Commons. No time? My newest post is informative too and offers many examples of urban commons. Did you know that the commons movement in Italian cities is thriving and that Bologna is experimenting with new forms of urban government, the city as a common?

Lees de al eerder gepubliceerde Nederlandse versie hier: https://wp.me/p32hqY-1T0

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Citizens&Living
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

1.5 meters is the new unit for smart city designers.

As Covid-19 continues to wreak havoc on public health and local economies around the world, one over-looked Corona casualty has been our collective space. Here in densely populated Amsterdam we are slowly, carefully, cautiously transitioning into a new urban landscape. As a smart city architect and designer, I wanted to start exploring this new 1.5 meter unit on the Marineterrein, Amsterdam’s inner-city testbed for future living environments. Using a computer fan, dental mirror, lego, and yes - a Laser pointer, I set out with my son to visualize what social distancing means on footbridges, fitness gardens, picnic tables, park benches, stairs, swimming docks and familiar Amsterdam furniture. Watch the video and learn how to build your own at https://www.tapp.nl/blog/mapping-social-distance-in-an-inner-city-testbed

Tom van Arman's picture #Citizens&Living
Herman van den Bosch, Curator at Amsterdam Smart City; professor in management education , posted

Do not talk to me about smart cities...

... when a significant proportion of its households are on or below the brink of poverty. Unfortunately, this applies to most global and self-proclaimed smart cities. My latest article, called Fair Cities, is about the frightening reality of urban poverty.
Nederlandse versie: https://t.co/uv6gxMBCcF

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Citizens&Living
Audrie van Veen, International Strategic Advisor at Amsterdam Economic Board, posted

EU Webinar on Covid-19 - best practices from European Cities

***Friday April 3 - 16-18h, online***

COVID-19 has transformed the lives of EU citizens dramatically, in a way that was not even possible to imagine just a month ago. Cities are in lockdown and health services are put under extreme pressure and pushed beyond their limits. Yet in the time of crisis, innovations are emerging that are saving lives and protecting livelihoods. Many of these involve new uses of technology, implemented by local actors at city and regional level.

To help cities navigate the current crisis and implement appropriate responses, the European Commission’s Intelligent Cities Challenge is launching a wider support package for COVID-19 to facilitate learning and the sharing of best practices on effective city-led interventions from European and global cities.

As a first step, we have organised two city-focused interactive webinars to learn, exchange practises and support city administrations. In this event, we will explore the pandemic and effective responses through expert perspectives, good city initiatives and open discussion. Topics include responses to health risks, interventions on economic impacts and overall strategies for effective management and preparation.

Audrie van Veen's picture #Citizens&Living
Toon Jansen, citymaker , posted

Nut en noodzaak van een compassie-platform in tijden van corona

Ik wil onderzoeken of het mogelijk is om op korte termijn een compassie-Contactplatform op internet te creëren en te organiseren waar mensen elkaar kunnen ontmoeten via skype en andere apps.

Mensen die ziek of slecht ter been zijn en veel risico lopen, kunnen dan via het platform met elkaar skypen of appen. Ook vrijwilligers kunnen dan met iemand skypen die daar veel behoefte aan heeft.

Zorginstellingen zouden cliënten kunnen aanmelden voor wie contact heel belangrijk is. Kinderen die zich thuis niet veilig voelen omdat er teveel spanningen zijn, kunnen een apart deel van het platform gebruiken.

Wie kan hierbij helpen en of adviseren om dat op korte termijn mogelijk te maken?

Meer informatie over compassie: https://toonjansen.amsterdam/compassie-in-tijden-van-corona

Toon Jansen's picture #Citizens&Living
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Best - independent & trustworthy global smart city ranking

Has anyone good experiences with independent global smart city rankings that are trustworthy in a sense that you don’t pay to be in their top ten or need to pay for an assessment?
Focus areas / criteria: investment in human and social capital, holistic approach, citizen centric & engagement
Smart City is the broadest way of speaking: liveable city, sustainable city, innovative city, digital city, (resilient city?)

What’s your opinion on:
1) https://www.imd.org/smart-city-observatory/smart-city-index/
2) https://www.eiu.com/topic/liveability

Many thanks in advance for your reaction.

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #Citizens&Living
Anonymous posted

Gezocht: Internship digital security bij Free Press Unlimited

Free Press Unlimited is offering a five to six month internship (32 hours a week) starting in January 2020. We're looking for a tech-savvy student or recent graduate with a relevant educational background and affinity with media development.

You will support several media projects implemented together with international partners. You will join the Gender, Safety & Accountability team in realising projects with global coverage in the field of digital safety and investigative journalism.

Are you drawn to whistleblowing platforms for media, online digital security courses for journalists? Do you feel confident about your knowledge of encryption, privacy, open source software and safe communication options? Then this internship is for you!

#SmartCityAcademy
Herman van den Bosch, Curator at Amsterdam Smart City; professor in management education , posted

Resilience....

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In my second essay in the series Future Cities: Smart by Default. Humane by choice, I dive into what makes a city resilient an how resilience looks through humane glasses...
Resilient cities: http://smartcityhub.com/resilient-cities/
De veerkrachtige stad: https://wp.me/p32hqY-1MA

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Citizens&Living
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

WeMakeThe.City event recap: Designing Change: Participatory Urban Design Today

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Often urban planning decisions are made by a select few. Some planning processes, such as public meetings or online comment petitions can prove difficult to get participation from everyone who will be impacted, especially those who feel as if there is no way for their voice to be heard, the poor, the disenfranchised, the fearful. One of the events during the WeMakeThe.City festival discussed the need for more diverse participation and inclusive communication of the needs of citizens within urban planning. A look back by special reporter Derrek Clarke.

The Designing Change conference started off with professor of the University of Miami School of Architecture Eric Firley. He recently published a book on his research into the changing nature of urban design over the past forty years. The book, Designing Change, takes a deep dive into the practice of urban design as experienced through 12 leading practitioners from across three continents. Firley’s research aim is to foster cross cultural conversation and knowledge sharing of the different aspects of urban design. The WeMakethe.City 2019 talk to promote Professor Firley’s book did just that by fostering a lively back and forth discussion between the professor, his three urban design guests and the audience of citizens, architects and urbanists.

One thing everyone agreed on is that we need more diverse participation and inclusive communication of the needs of citizens within urban planning. As Regula Luscher, the Head of the Planning and Building Department of Berlin stated:

“Participation is about being able to reach target groups. This is very difficult to do and will impact the use of technology in urban development.”

Often urban planning decisions are made by a select few. Some planning processes, such as public meetings or online comment petitions can prove difficult to get participation from everyone who will be impacted, especially those who feel as if there is no way for their voice to be heard, the poor, the disenfranchised, the fearful. It isn’t to say, that achieving greater participation and hearing the concerns of impacted citizens is impossible. Amsterdam has proved to be a fertile experiment ground for participatory urban planning.

Both Tom Schaap, Senior Urbanist for the City of Amsterdam and Paola Vigano, Head of the Laboratory of Urbanism at the Technical University of Lausanne referenced Amsterdam as a classic model of what can be achieved through active community participation. As Tom explained, “Amsterdam is a great example to the EU and to the world with its development into a bike centred city. It didn’t happen overnight but involved lots of participation. It changed street by street and neighbourhood by neighbourhood”.

A Question Of Technology And The Smart City

Current technologies, mainly smartphones and low-cost sensors may hold the keys to more inclusive participation in urban development projects. Sensors can be used to track traffic patterns and public use of space while smartphone apps can be used to communicate with disenfranchised citizens to enable them to participate in the planning process.

However, the use of these technologies pose many questions around personal privacy and what secondary uses the collected data will be subjected to. Use of these solutions may drive citizen communication and participation in the process lower, or worse; mire the whole process in endless arguments. The Canadian city of Toronto is experiencing just this as it slowly tries to progress through the planning of Google's Sidewalk Labs’ waterfront development. Progress on this proposed smart city development has slowed because of discussions about the ownership and use of the data that will be at the core of the development’s smart city operations.

This is not to say that technology is bad and can’t serve a purpose when it comes to increasing participation in urban development, it can. To be useful, technology has to balance participation enablement with protecting the personal freedoms of the community as a whole.

Urban Planning Is The Chance To Dream At The Scale Of The City

A personal freedom cherished by all is the freedom of mobility. Whether a smart city or not, no urban development project can be discussed without addressing the topic of getting from one place to another. As Regula states, “In every participation project traffic is always the question. How to move the people is always a central idea.” History bears witness to this through the grand boulevards of Baron Hausmann in 1800s Paris or the many public works projects of Robert Moses in mid-20th Century New York City. Throughout history, traffic management and the need for better infrastructure to deal with congestion has been a central component of many urban development strategies. This focus on transportation continues today in cities such as present-day Amsterdam where communities are pushing for less use of personal vehicles and greater use of cycling, pedestrian ways and potential mobility-as-a-service options.

Urbanist Paola Vigano proposes another solution to increasing urban density and transportation congestion. She asks: “Why have we forgotten about living across the land and continue to focus on the urban area? Why continue to densify the city, which pushes out the people who already live there?”. Paola believes we should not neglect satellite cities. These should be developed as diverse places to live, play and work with high-speed connections to larger urban centers. Paola proposes this experiment to resolve urban congestion while also addressing the plight of rural areas suffering from population drain.

Moving Forward Through Experimentation

“If we can’t do experiments, then we can’t make the future” states Regula Luscher as she aptly sums up the combined views of the panellists and the audience in attendance at this talk. In the end, we must experiment to resolve urban development challenges. Whether the topic is how to address the challenge of community participation, immigration, migration, transportation or crisis such as climate change – the answer is always “we have to experiment and try out different solutions”.

What works in one city may not directly translate into a successful initiative in another city. We have to listen to communities, get their participation and collectively experiment until we have working solutions.

Photos and text: Derrek Clarke

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Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

The secret to building an inclusive city

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By many accounts the Amsterdam of today represents an urban success story. Despite all the positive changes however, there are many complex social challenges that need addressing. In a short period of time, Amsterdam has transformed drastically in terms of population and economic development but also in the number of visitors.

These urban challenges were the focus of the 2nd Up Close and Liveable Conference which took place on June 21 as part of Amsterdam’s WeMakeThe.City festival. A recap by our special reporter Katerina Ryabets.

By many accounts the Amsterdam of today represents an urban success story. Despite all the positive changes however, there are many complex social challenges that need addressing. In a short period of time, Amsterdam has transformed drastically in terms of population and economic development but also in the number of visitors coming to the city.

These urban challenges were the focus of the 2nd Up Close and Liveable Conference which took place on June 21 as part of Amsterdam’s WeMakeThe.City festival. The conference brought together an international audience of urban professionals, researchers, policy-makers, and city-dwellers to address a range of social urban pressures, ranging from access to housing and climate justice, to the impacts of increased tourism, the protection of digital human rights, and urban health.

So, who belongs in the city?

Well-known for her popular TED talk on the topic of urban belonging, the Nigerian writer, editor, and activist OluTimehin Adegbeye kicked the day off with a keynote address and the question: who belongs in the city? In her talk, OluTimehin reminds us that our cities are reflections of ourselves, and that it is up to us to keep both our governments and ourselves responsible for creating safe and accessible cities for all: “If cities are to continue to exist we cannot accept systemic exclusion as part of the urban experience. Cities are only as exclusionary as we make them”.

Speaking from her experiences in her hometown of Lagos, Adegbeye raised challenges that are being felt in cities across the world, from Nigeria to the Netherlands. Her speech reminds us that the feeling of belonging in a city is not universal and the unfortunate reality is that the urban experience does not offer the same opportunities for all.

“The promise of cities lies in the remarkable ability to aggregate the vast spectrum of human possibilities and create new and unforeseen realities from that. We all lose when cities are allowed to become hubs of homogeneity.” - OluTimehin Adegbeye

Community-centered interventions for improving urban health

The morning breakout session on improving urban health highlighted an important theme that would run through the rest of the day. All speakers stressed the necessity to consider the day-to-day lived experiences of underserved or marginalized individuals and communities when developing policies or interventions to address urban inequality.

Jessica Attard from the Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Charity in London shared insights from their efforts fighting childhood obesity in two of the city’s most diverse and deprived boroughs. She explained that to be able to positively impact the health of vulnerable communities we must first start with a change in perspective to really understand the lived experiences of these groups. This sentiment was echoed by Cecilia Vaca Jones, Program Director of the Bernard van Leer Foundation whose work with initiatives such as Urban95 focuses on improving urban environments so that children and families can thrive. Like Attard, she challenged the audience to consider the city from the perspective of its smallest and most vulnerable users, arguing that if we can make cities work for them, they will work for everybody.

Accessibility and inclusivity in the digital city

A later session focussing on the topic of digital human rights (rights that individuals and communities are entitled to when accessing and using the internet and other digital technologies) introduced the work of the Cities Coalition for Digital Rights- a joint initiative launched by the cities of Amsterdam, Barcelona and New York City to protect and uphold human rights in the digital realm. In explaining the goals of the Coalition, Max Sevillia, Director of External Affairs at the City of New York spoke about the necessity of putting a foundation of digital human rights at the core of urban technological interventions or platforms that cities introduce.

The internet plays a central role in our daily lives, and for those without equal access to digital technologies, accessing governmental services, searching for employment opportunities or even pursuing education represents a real challenge. By sharing insights, and co-creating actionable plans, the cities within this coalition are putting their weight behind protecting and promoting digital human rights and are focused on eliminating the barriers that different groups face in accessing technological opportunities.

“We are often sold on the idea of smart cities. But it’s much more important to be a wise city. Wise cities put people first. '' - Daniel Sarasa Funes, Urban Innovation Planner, Zaragoza City Council (Spain)

Do better policy tools lead to more equal cities?

One of the final sessions of the day turned the discussion over to the tools that politicians and planners are using when developing policies addressing urban inequalities. The Social City Index, created by the International Federation of Housing and Planning (IFHP) is a tool that can be used to provide municipalities with a better understanding of how their city is doing along various social indicators at the city and neighbourhood levels.

The goal is to assist in decision making, ideally fostering cross-departmental collaboration within local and regional governments. While there was a unanimous agreement from the panel about the importance of collecting measurable data for informed decision making, Professor Darko Radovic of the Keio University in Japan raised an important point. He reminds us that while data can help paint a picture of the state of society, we must be aware that numbers are not neutral, and to continue to consider those groups and individuals whose experiences may not be adequately covered by selective indicators. In other words, we must be curious about what the numbers aren’t showing us.

Putting the individual at the heart of complex problems

After an inspiring and thought-provoking conference, by far the greatest takeaway was that anyone concerned with improving accessibility and inclusivity in the city, be it governments or societal groups must begin their efforts with a deep understanding of the day-to-day realities of the communities that they wish to empower. Unfortunately there is no magic pill for fixing urban inequality, but it is only from this consideration for the lived experiences of the city’s most vulnerable users that we can take meaningful strides towards making cities better for all.

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Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Sustainable mobility on demand is not only for cities, is it?

My friend Marco Maréchal wrote an interesting article on unlocking municipalities and the countryside towards the cities via sustainable mobility on demand.

Although I agree with most of his views, I think we should take this conversation to a more holistic level: how can we work parallel towards innovations that people do not need to travel to work every day anymore.
Let's also think about moving ‘bits and bytes instead of atoms’ or in other words bring the ‘work to the worker instead the worker to work’ (quotes by Bas Boorsma).
So, we can work on reducing the amount of transportation movements. Compare it with waste management or reducing your electricity bill.

If we are able to convince people to produce less waste, it is the best solution to our waste problem instead of finding innovative and most of the expensive ways to process all the current waste.
And reducing energy consumption by isolating houses is far more effective than generating more energy in sustainable ways.

Therefore, reducing cars and other transportation activities is at least as important as finding sustainable mobility solutions on demand to improve the quality of living of citizens who work-live-play in urban and rural areas.
f we are able to convince people to produce less waste it is the best solution to our waste problem instead of finding innovative and most of the expensive ways to process all the current waste.
And reducing energy consumption by isolating houses is far more affective than generating more energy in sustainable ways.

Therefore, reducing cars and other transportation movements activities is at least as important as finding sustainable mobility solutions on demand to improve the quality of living of citizens who work-live-play in urban and rural areas.

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #Mobility
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

Testing Amsterdam Broedplaatsen in Boston USA.

Throughout history, the Dutch have been world famous for reclaiming land to make way for more productive space. Fast forward to today, and we see how the city is reclaiming derelict space to make way for creative industries. With over 60 locations to date, ‘Amsterdam Broedplaatsen’ has already transformed former problem-properties into more productive and profitable districts. Since its inception 10 years ago, this approach has proven to be a success having created acclaimed hotbeds like De Ceuvel, A-Lab, B.Amsterdam.

Can the success of Amsterdam Broedplaatsen work internationally?

Last month, we tested the Broedplaatsen concept in Boston. This 24hrs hands-on workshop asked 8 teams of entrepreneurs, spatial planners and community leaders to transform 15 properties in the Dorchester & Mattapan neighbourhoods. The challenge utilised digital tools and strategies of relevant data collection, applying design thinking, and immersion techniques. All eight teams rapid prototyped some serious pop-up solutions that will have a lasting impact on the growth and sustainability of the district communities.

See the results here: http://www.citixl.com/reclaiming-space-results/

Tom van Arman's picture #Citizens&Living
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Sittard-Geleen zoekt smart toepassingen in de openbare ruimte

Innovatieve ideeën krijgen het podium in Sittard-Geleen

Heb jij een innovatief product dat bijdraagt aan de smart openbare ruimte? En wil jij een plek in een proeftuin om dit product te 'testen'? Meld je dan aan voor de pitchcarrousel van de gemeente Sittard-Geleen!

Sittard-Geleen krijgt een eigen proeftuin, waarin we de openbare ruimte van de toekomst maken. Om de ideeën en initiatieven te inventariseren organiseren we een pitchcarrousel.

zie ook: http://future-city.nl/pitchcarrouselsittardgeleen/

Kom jij jouw product ook pitchen?

De details op een rijtje:

• Donderdag 18 april 2019
• Maximaal 17 pitches
• 4 minuten per pitch
• Nationaal en internationaal
• Zichtbare smart oplossingen in de openbare ruimte
• Geheel vrijblijvende deelname
• Ontmoet andere ondernemers in de (smart) openbare ruimte
• Kom in contact met andere gemeenten die hun openbare ruimte smart willen maken

Over de proeftuin

De gemeente is de tuinman in andermans tuin. Althans, zo denk de gemeente Sittard-Geleen erover. Daarom zijn zij het project ‘De Tuinman van Sittard-Geleen’ gestart. Komend jaar gaan wij met hen aan de slag met de Tuinman van Morgen, waarin we de Tuinman ‘smart’ gaan maken.

De Tuinman van Morgen is onderdeel van het Smart Stedenbouw project van de Future City Foundation. In dit project onderzoeken we met ruim twintig partners hoe de ontwerpopgave van de stad verandert door digitalisering en technologisering.

De Tuinman krijgt een eigen proeftuin, waarin we de openbare ruimte van de toekomst maken. In de proeftuin willen we ideeën en initiatieven van burgers, verenigingen en bedrijven samenbrengen. Hiervoor organiseren we een pitchcarrousel. Een pitchcarrousel is een bijeenkomst van een middag waarin vernieuwende (smart) oplossingen en producten voor de openbare ruimte zich presenteren. Na de pitchcarrousel beslist de gemeente Sittard-Geleen met welke partijen zij de proeftuin willen uitvoeren.

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Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

Smart Cameras for a Smart City

Last Friday 01 March 2019, the city of Amsterdam published a digital map showing us which parts of the city are collecting data about our environment and even ourselves: slimmeapparaten.amsterdam.nl

Among other things the map shows is the actual location of surveillance cameras, but what it doesn’t show you is how smart these cameras are becoming. In the future, these cameras will be embedded with new layers like deep-learning, wire framing, motion tracking and facial recognition capabilities that deliver more detail and insights about our streets, sidewalks and neighbourhoods.

As more of these cutting edge cameras technologies become sewn into our urban fabric, the question becomes: what is the difference between cameras as surveillance or as a civic solution?

Our CITIXL initiative teamed up with Smart Taipei and Umbo Camera to explore how these cameras will impact society in Amsterdam. The goal of this experiment was to collect data as dialogue and discuss what these cameras mean for our future smart city.

For more information about please visit: www.citixl.com

Tom van Arman's picture #Citizens&Living
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

Amsterdam is helping other water scarce cities avoid "Day 0”

Amsterdam is not a city that needs to worry about water. However there are many cities around the world that are seeing much more extended dry periods and will soon run out of water. Cape Town, San Paulo, Las Vegas, Mexico City and many more will run out of water in next few decades unless water use is radically changed. These water scarce cities will start designating water distribution points and start rationing water.

This is called 'Day 0’

CITIXL is now testing 15 wireless smart water meters in De Ceuvel, a clean tech living lab in Amsterdam that asks the question: How can we measure or monitor water consumption? And what new tools can we co-create that encourage water conservation?

CITIXL will begin to work with communities to become a living model and help other cities avoid ‘Day 0’

Tom van Arman's picture #Citizens&Living
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

What do all these Living Labs mean for Amsterdammers?

Today there are over 40 “Living Labs” and hundreds of experiments, tests, pilots taking place in Amsterdam. Last Friday, 25 January 2019 we asked Amsterdam’s policy makers, knowledge partners and community leaders a series of questions in a fun interactive pub quiz format entitled “Living Labs - New Years Resolution”. The event was divided into various ePolling sessions with the aim to capture and visualise the various interpretations, definitions and attitudes of todays living labs. Make your opinion count! If you want to add your voice to the discussion please visit www.CITIXL.com and take the quick-scan 5 minute survey. We’ll be sharing the results next Friday, 8 February.

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Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

We Proudly Present Our Partners: Part #11 Kennisland

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In June we kicked off a new phase of Amsterdam Smart City. More partners than ever are pooling their networks, knowledge and skills. Who are they? We will present some of them one by one. Kennisland: 'Experimenting with new interventions and solutions for the city by tackling urban problems.'

What is the main reason for you to join the open collective Amsterdam Smart City?

The Amsterdam Smart City collective forms a strong power to tackle complex urban and regional issues. Kennisland joined the collective to help make sure that the transitions taking shape in the fields of mobility, digitisation and energy are fair, inclusive and transparent.

What is your ambition for the city and the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area?

Kennisland is working to create an inclusive city and to investigate new ways of involving all the experience and creativity present in the city and beyond.

What do you think is the biggest challenge for the city and the region in the future?

In recent years, many government responsibilities have been moved from the national to the local level. This means that municipalities have new tasks, and that a great deal of policy is now developed and implemented in an urban context and therefore closer to (and preferably in interaction with) citizens. We have observed that many municipalities are struggling with this – how should these duties be realised in practice, and how can citizens be involved in this process?

How do you see the role of the residents and citizens in your plans?

Kennisland is experimenting with new interventions and solutions for the city by understanding and tackling urban problems at the local level, based on the stories and experiences of those directly involved. As such, the stories and needs of all city residents play a key role in our work. Everyone can and must contribute to the discussion and work together to ensure that the city remains a place for everyone in the future.

What do you hope to work on in the upcoming years?

We hope to work on alternative ways of organising the city. We ask ourselves which type of governance will produce a city that is open, inclusive and successful. Which role can governments, citizens, community initiatives and businesses play in this? How can we ensure that all residents benefit from the wealth of opportunities offered in the city?

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