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AMS Institute, Re-inventing the city (urban innovation) at AMS Institute, posted

Responsible Sensing Lab

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The City of Amsterdam has many smart technologies in place: from smart devices that measure things (i.e. sensors) to smart devices that steer processes in the city (i.e. actuators) such as traffic lights, charging stations, adaptable street lights, barriers that go up and down, and adaptive digital signs.

To illustrate, throughout the city there are over 200 cameras, about 230 air quality sensors and almost 500 beacons in place. The latter being devices in physical spaces that emit a signal that can be picked up by mobile devices with a specific app.

Smart technologies like these help the municipality to efficiently measure, analyse and steer processes in the urban area. For example to optimize mobility flows in urban environments, to better use available capacity of energy infrastructures, to conduct condition management on the city’s assets, rationalise garbage removal and much more.

Responsible Urban Digitization
On the one hand, innovations like these can help improve the quality of life in the city and enhance safety and efficiency, but also sustainability and livability. Simultaneously, such novel technologies can impact society quite broadly. They could have consequences for matters that citizens value greatly, such as autonomy, privacy, transparency, inclusiveness and empowerment.

“The City does not want its inhabitants negatively impacted by potential privacy infringements, sense of loss of control and understandability, or reactions such as self-censorship.” - Sigrid Winkel | Urban Innovation Officer | City of Amsterdam CTO

“Our recent research has pointed out that ‘official’ actors primarily see transparency as a mean to ensure adoption, while citizens see transparency as a starting point for voicing their concerns and influencing the purpose and use of smart technology. This leads us to conclude that we - as designers of these systems - need to aim to design these systems for engagement as well as pushback by society.” - Gerd Kortuem | Professor & AMS PI

Launching a Responsible Sensing Lab
With our Responsible Urban Digitization program, we research, develop and integrate smart technologies like the aforementioned to help solve urban challenges. At the same time, we explore how to embed society’s public and democratic values in the design of these innovations.

As part of this program, we are launching a Responsible Sensing Lab. In essence this is a testbed for conducting rigorous, transparent, and replicable research how our smart technologies placed in public space can be designed in a way that makes the digital city ‘responsible’.

(Re)designing, prototype testing and implementing responsible sensing systems
In the Responsible Sensing Lab academics are invited to connect and work with practitioners who are responsible for digital systems in the city to (re)design, prototype and test (more) responsible ways of sensing in public space for and with the City of Amsterdam.

Hence, the Lab is a place where teams of multi-disciplinary stakeholders – such as computer scientists, policy makers, psychologists, designers and hardware experts – can address existing hardware, software and other city sensing systems.

“Responsible Sensing Lab is a place where experimentation and technologies come together to (re)design these innovations solutions that make public spaces cleaner, smarter and easier – while at the same time guaranteeing our social values.” - Thijs Turèl | Program Manager Responsible Urban Digitization | AMS Institute

Three cases: Human Scan Car, Transparant Charging Station, Camera Shutter
There are already a few examples of projects that will be further explored in the Responsible Sensing Lab. Namely, the Human Scan Car, Transparent Charging Station and Camera Shutter projects.

Firstly, scan cars – vehicles that are equipped with sensors to collect data on the urban environment – are becoming increasingly popular to help the municipality to carry out tasks efficiently. For example with parking policy enforcement, waste registration and advertisement taxation. Apart from making the city more efficient and clean, with this project we question and explore what public and democratic values should be embedded in the implementation of these scan cars.

Together with UNSense, we invited representatives from the City of Amsterdam and Rotterdam, TADA, and researchers from TU Delft to join us for a 3-day sprint to design “the scan car of the future”, that also looks at the human and fair values of the advances in technology. Get a full impression of this design sprint here.

“Design should play a role in guiding the perceptions of, and interactions with, automated sensing systems in the city. Going through this process with AMS Institute's researchers and public servants, we’ll be able to bend the design towards a more consciously chosen, collectively desirable future.” - Tessa Steenkamp | Sensorial Experience Designer | UNSense

Secondly, the transparent charging station is a design project meant to explain smart charging algorithm decisions to users. In the near future, when electric cars become more prevelant, the electicity grid will no longer be able to charge all electric cars at the same time. Smart charging algorithms will help coordinate which car will get to charge at what time. But how do these algorithms decide? The transparent charging station project produces the first user interface informing people about smart charging decisions.

"The transparent charging station promises to improve the democratic oversight of algorithms in EV charging. By explaining charging algorithm inputs, procedures and outputs in a user interface, EV drivers should be able to determine the system's fairness and see who the responsible parties are". - Kars Alfrink | Doctoral Researcher | TU Delft

Thirdly, the Camera Shutter project originated based on the notion that people do not know if and when cameras in public space are recording or not*.* We wondered: would people like to live in a city where all city cameras clearly show or state when they’re not in use? What if, just like laptop shutters many people have placed over their webcam, this could be a way to make clear to citizens when a camera is not recording them?

For this third project, a timelapse camera at the office of AMS Institute was outfitted with a shutter. Subsequently, the effects of this small-scale pilot will be examined by interviewing staff and visitors.

Core values for responsible urban digitization
At the Responsible Sensing Lab, and for Responsible Urban Digitization program as a whole, we use the City’s values (TADA, Digital City Agenda) as our starting point. We will explore what these values mean when applied to actual digital software and hardware.

Also, we are inspired by the methodology of value sensitive design. This approach allows us to focus on design choices inherent in the type of sensing hardware, the distribution of intelligence between cloud and back-end, the physical design and placement of sensors in public space, and interaction possibilities for citizens.

Recently, a three year collaboration has been signed between the City of Amsterdam and AMS Institute. In this Lab, we’ll work closely with experts at TU Delft Industrial Design Faculty.

AMS Institute's picture #DigitalCity
Communication Alliance for a Circular Region (CACR), posted

Communication Alliance for a Circular Region (CACR)

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De taskforce Communication Alliance for a Circular Region (CACR) wil de circulaire economie in de Metropoolregio Amsterdam versnellen met praktische verhalen voor en over ondernemers en bedrijven. We nodigen iedereen uit mee te doen met de discussie op amsterdamsmartcity.com. De CACR bestaat uit: Hogeschool van Amsterdam | Gemeente Amsterdam | Amsterdam Economic Board | Amsterdam Smart City | Metabolic en AMS Institute.

Artikelen 'Circulaire economie en data'

Volop kansen in de nieuwe circulaire werkelijkheid: Data zijn de zuurstof van de circulaire economie: deel 1
Slim datagebruik in de circulaire economie: de drie belangrijkste redenen (CACR): Data zijn de zuurstof van de circulaire economie: deel 2

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The taskforce Communication Alliance for a Circular Region (CACR) is working to accelerate the circular economy in the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area, sharing practical stories for and about entrepreneurs and businesses. The CACR is an initiative by Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences | City of Amsterdam | Amsterdam Economic Board | Amsterdam Smart City | Metabolic | AMS Institute.

Articles 'Circular economy and data'

• A wealth of opportunities in the new circular reality: Data is the oxygen that the circular economy thrives on: part 1
• Smart data usage in the circular economy: 3 key reasons: Data is the oxygen that the circular economy thrives on: part 2

Communication Alliance for a Circular Region (CACR)'s picture #CircularCity
Boen Groothoff, Project manager Smart Mobility at City of Amsterdam: Chief Technology Office, posted

Operationeel Mobiliteitscentrum (OMC)

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In de toekomst zullen we ons anders door de stad moeten bewegen. Vanwege de toenemende drukte en de verduurzamingsopgave zullen we minder afhankelijk moeten worden van onze privéauto. Dit betekent meer fietsen, meer met het openbaar vervoer en meer gebruik van nieuwe vormen van vervoer zoals deelmobiliteit. Om deze mobiliteitstransitie te kunnen faciliteren moet de gemeente ook haar rol als wegbeheerder herzien. De huidige verkeerscentrale is namelijk nog vooral gericht op klassiek wegverkeer en kijkt dus niet naar de verschillende mobiliteitsstromen. Daarom testen we in Amsterdam Zuidoost met een nieuwe mobiliteitscentrale die naar alle verschillende mobiliteitsstromen kijkt.

Boen Groothoff's picture #Mobility
Francien Huizing, Program and Communication Manager at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Wicked Problems

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Te wicked? Niet voor ons.

Wij werken allemaal aan urgente, complexe, maatschappelijke uitdagingen. Issues die schier onoplosbaar lijken, van dilemma’s en paradoxen omgeven, nog niet duidelijk hoe het moet. Wel is duidelijk dát het moet, dat we elkaar nodig
hebben en dat we er NU aan moeten beginnen. Om met de woorden van Jan Rotmans te spreken; we leven niet in een tijdperk van verandering maar in een verandering van tijdperk. En hier hoort een nieuwe gereedschapskist bij.

En of je nou aan energietransitie werkt, andere mobiliteitssystemen, creëren van waterstofhubs, peer to peer autodeelsystemen, het maakt niet uit, we zien dat al deze opgaven op enig moment tegen gelijksoortige barrières aanlopen. Op samenwerking, financiering, privacy, onvoldoende aansluiting op de maatschappij, om maar een paar voorbeelden te noemen.

Unieke samenwerking
Als Amsterdam Smart City netwerk willen en kunnen we deze opgaven niet laten liggen. Door het bundelen van onze kennis en expertise kunnen we als netwerk iets unieks bieden en de wil en durf tonen om deze barrières te doorbreken. De betrokken partners die dit uitdenken en begeleiden zijn RHDHV, Kennisland, Drift, NEMO, Arcadis, Alliander, HvA en Metabolic. Zij bundelen hun expertise en ervaring om de echte vragen boven tafel te krijgen, tot nieuwe manieren van samenwerken te komen en barrières te doorbreken. We richten ons met name op de start van de samenwerking. Gezamenlijk ontwikkelen we een ‘wicked problem aanpak’. Op een nieuwe manier, lerend door te doen, exploratief.

Waar moet je aan denken?
Wat is eigenlijk het echte probleem? Wiens probleem is dit? Hoe kijken anderen er tegenaan? Welke andere partijen lijken nodig? Hoe vind je ze? Hoe ga je om met eigenaarschap en botsende frames? Hoe zorg je dat je al in
een vroeg stadium de maatschappij (bewoners, ondernemers, werknemers, etc) betrekt en hun ervaringen in het project trekt? Het wicked problem team zet nieuwe methoden in voor het beantwoorden van deze vragen. En het creëren van de benodigde commitment om het vraagstuk aan te pakken. Niets staat van te voren vast, want we passen ons aan aan wat we tegenkomen. Met elkaar ontwikkelen we een nieuwe aanpak om de barrières te doorbreken.

Francien Huizing's picture #Energy
Isolde de Ridder - Le Creurer, CEO , posted

Isolde de Ridder Sieraden

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At Isolde de Ridder Sieraden, founded by Isolde de Ridder – Le Creurer in 2017, creating high-end jewellery with the greatest of care for both people and planet, is our mission. We strive to make the world more beautiful with our unique jewellery. Our unique pieces are crafted by hand in the Netherlands. Jewellery that give discarded metals and other materials a second life and that contribute to a better world for generations to come.

Isolde de Ridder - Le Creurer's picture #CircularCity
Hede Razoky, Accountmanager Upcyclecentrum , posted

Upcyclecentrum Almere

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In the Upcyclecentrum we make the circular economy and the upcycle process visible and tangible. We don’t do this alone. Our residents provide us with raw materials by properly separating their waste, the entrepreneurs (startups) upcycle these raw materials into new products and inspiring workshops are organized in our circular designed experience center. Waste = raw material in the circular economy; this is the central theme of all our activities.

Follow us on instagram on www.instagram.com/upcyclecentrum
#upcyclecentrum

#CircularCity
Joost Bosker, entrepreneur , posted

3-CYCLE

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We are 3-CYCLE, a new upcycling project by Erik Fakkeldij (The Botfactory) and Joost Bosker (Oerz). We joint forces in 2019 to create new products from used pieces of plastics and metal. And... to make this a true dutch innovation, we use a setup with a bike to do the first steps of the upcycling process!

But that's not all... we do this by giving workshops and presentations to kids and the public to create more awareness. Our aim is to show that waste is not only bad for the environment, but it also means missed opportunities for reusing the waste and upcycling it into new products.

We believe this type of education is key for engaging the public, while making a
difference at the same time.

#CircularCity
Laura Meijering, Founder & Creative Director , posted

Unravelau

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Unravelau is a high-end fashion brand established in 2017 by the designer Laura Meijering who believes that you don’t have to sacrifice style in order to make conscious choices. While each collection is unique, they are all designed with care for the planet. Our garments are handcrafted in The Netherlands and made of natural and upcycled materials only. At Unravelau, we believe that every little step counts - together with you, we unravel the fashion industry. One garment at a time.

Laura Meijering's picture #CircularCity
Sanne de Boer, posted

De energietransitie uitgelegd

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De energietransitie is een van de belangrijkste maatschappelijke thema’s van dit moment en van de komende jaren. Maar wat ís de energietransitie? En wat zijn de specifieke doelen? Wat is het verschil tussen ‘energieneutraal’, ‘klimaatneutraal’ en ‘CO₂-neutraal’? Welke rol kan waterstof (niet) gaan spelen in de gebouwde omgeving van de toekomst? En hoe zitten ons huidige energieverbruik en energiesysteem in elkaar? Deze en andere vragen worden beantwoord in het boek ‘De energietransitie uitgelegd’. Ook komt aan de orde waar de uitdagingen liggen voor de energietransitie en hoe het energiesysteem er in 2050 ongeveer uit zal zien.

‘De energietransitie uitgelegd’ biedt alle basiskennis die nodig is om het nieuws omtrent de energietransitie kritisch te kunnen volgen en een gefundeerde mening te vormen in discussies over dit thema. Er is geen specifieke voorkennis nodig om het boek te kunnen lezen, maar het gaat op bepaalde onderwerpen wel diep in. Hierdoor is het boek interessant voor zowel energie-professionals als geïnteresseerde leken.

Nieuwsgierig geworden? Bestel het boek via uw boekhandel, bol.com of door het sturen van een email aan info@degroenewaterlelie.nl. Bij een afname van 10 of meer boeken ontvang je 5% korting (alleen bij bestellingen via email).

Het boek is gedrukt op boomvrij papier. Er zijn alleen bio-inkten gebruikt en er is gewerkt zonder schadelijke oplosmiddelen.

Sanne de Boer's picture #Energy
Negar Noori, Smart Cities Tech & Policy Researcher at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), posted

Transition from Smart to Inclusive city

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The primary objective of this research project is to enhance an understanding of the concept of inclusion and its criteria in Smart city discourse. The research ambition is applying the result as a tool for benchmarking inclusive smart cities, which can assess and improve them. To apply the result, we aim to work with cities like Amsterdam, The Hauge, and Rotterdam.

Negar Noori's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Negar Noori, Smart Cities Tech & Policy Researcher at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), posted

Classifying Pathways for Smart City Development: Comparing Design, Governance and Implementation in Amsterdam, Barcelona, Dubai, and Abu Dhabi

The emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT) as the new paradigm of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and rapid changes in technology and urban needs urge cities around the world towards formulating smart city policies. Nevertheless, policy makers, city planners, and practitioners appear to have quite different expectations from what smart cities can offer them. This has led to the emergence of different types of smart cities and pathways of development. This research aims to answer the research question: When comparing a selection of smart city projects, can we classify pathways for their implementation? We do this by using a cross-case research design of four cities to explore commonalities and differences in development patterns. An input-output (IO) model of smart city development is used to retrieve which design variables are at play and lead to which output. The four cases pertain to the following smart city projects: Smart Dubai, Masdar City, Barcelona Smart City, and Amsterdam Smart City. Our analysis shows that Amsterdam is based on a business-driven approach that puts innovation at its core; for Masdar, technological optimism is the main essence of the pathway; social inclusion is the focus of Barcelona Smart City; and visionary ambitious leadership is the main driver for Smart Dubai. Based on these insights, a classification for smart city development pathways is established. The results of the present study are useful to academic researchers, smart city practitioners, and policy makers.

Negar Noori's picture Project
Negar Noori, Smart Cities Tech & Policy Researcher at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), posted

Input-Output Modelling for Smart City Development

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While many national and local governments in the world these days are placing their bets on smart city development in countering challenges , few know exactly how to develop them in practice. A high and rising number of publications has appeared addressing the concept of ‘smart city’, but not many address implementation issues. This paper aims at a conceptual understanding of the smart city by describing its various facets and using them to develop an Input-Output model helping policy makers and analysts make reasoned design choices. Using this model allows policy-makers and analysts to further their conceptual understanding of smart cities, envisage design choices they will face during implementation and understand the effects of these choices. Finally, the model and design variables are illustrated by introducing the case of ‘Smart Dubai’. Overall this paper provides an enhanced understanding of the smart city development process which can be used as a support tool for decision making.

Negar Noori's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Bernard MERKX, CEO, owner at GreenWavePlastics, posted

Oceanic Face shields

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Personal protection products made with high plastic recycling content (all green parts) Other parts still work in progress

Bernard MERKX's picture #Citizens&Living
Bernard MERKX, CEO, owner at GreenWavePlastics, posted

OCEAN (and EAR) SAVERS

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Product made with 100% recycled plastics from the maritime industry (obsolete fishing gear and ropes)

Bernard MERKX's picture #Citizens&Living
Louise Holloway, Director , posted

Solar Decathlon Europe

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The Call for Cities for the Solar Decathlon Europe 2023 has been published. This would be a huge opportunity for Amsterdam to host this event to raise energy literacy.

#CircularCity
Carolien Wiltink, Online Marketing manager at Seenons, posted

Seenons

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Samen maken wij 100.000 bedrijven restafval-vrij in 2025!

Seenons maakt het omschakelen naar een duurzame bedrijfsvoering gemakkelijk.

Seenons bundelt de krachten van traditionele afvaldienstverleners en duurzame logistieke partijen in een intelligent platform. Jij geeft aan welke specifieke afvalstromen er vrij komen bij jou in het bedrijf. Wij kijken welke partij bij jou in de buurt is en halen het afval op de meest duurzame manier op. Dit gebeurt allemaal contract vrij en is optimaal flexibel opgesteld. Geen vaste dagen met betrekking tot het ophalen. Simpelweg: bak vol? Geef het door, wij regelen de rest!

Op de hoogte blijven van ontwikkelingen of meer informatie?

Stuur een mailtje naar <hallo@seenons.com>

Carolien Wiltink's picture #CircularCity
Mira Kopp, Assistant , posted

EC-Link Platform

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You would like to connect with Urban Environmental Sustainability practitioners and researchers in China and exchange your approaches to green transport, clean energy, compact urban development, water and solid waste management, green buildings and municipal finance? Then sign up to the EC-Link platform! The platform links Eco Cities across Europe and China, offering inspiring examples from both sides of Eurasia and enabling direct contacts to the innovators. With the help of an integrated translation tool, posts can be translated into Chinese and English with just one click. Use of the platform is free of charge: http://eclink.org/bbs/#/?lang=en

A description of how the platform works can be downloaded here: http://eclink.org/ec_platform/upload/document/EC-Link_Users'%20Guide-EN.pdf

EC Link

#CircularCity
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

CityFlows

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Cornelia Dinca's picture #Mobility
Laury Zwart, Project Manager and Communication , posted

Parksharing: for local collaboration and sharing between businesses

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The importance of working together locally, sharing together, and matching supply and demand between companies is increasing. More than ever, we see local entrepreneurs helping each other and purchasing products or services from one another. Working together from the catering industry to healthcare pays off. Parksharing enables entrepreneurs, businesses and organizations to take concrete steps towards local cooperation and sustainable entrepreneurship.

Connecting, collaborating and sustainability
We connect companies and organizations at local level through Parksharing. The platform shows which companies and organizations are in the municipality and what they can do for each other. Companies can then offer and purchase their products and services among themselves. After all, why find a distant friend when you have a good neighbor?

In addition, companies can match and share the supply and demand of company resources, materials, residual flows, services, personnel and facilities. For some companies, there is a great demand for materials, resources or extra manpower, while for other organizations equipment is idle or staff are temporarily available.

Think very concretely about: forklift trucks, storage space, parking spaces, partial mobility, residual flows and materials, transport capacity, meeting rooms, surplus stock, knowledge, sustainable projects or business cases, workplaces, technical staff and warehouse employees, for example.

PARKSHARING FOR LOCAL COLLABORATION AND SHARING

The importance of working together locally, sharing together, and matching supply and demand between companies is increasing. More than ever, we see local entrepreneurs helping each other and purchasing products or services from one another. Working together from the catering industry to healthcare pays off. Park sharing enables entrepreneurs, companies and organizations to take concrete steps towards local cooperation and sustainable entrepreneurship.

CONNECT, COLLABORATE, SHARE AND BECOME SUSTAINABLE

We connect companies and organizations at local level through Parksharing. The platform shows which companies and organizations are in the municipality and what they can do for each other. Companies can then offer and purchase their products and services among themselves. After all, why find a distant friend when you have a good neighbor?

In addition, companies can match and share the supply and demand of company resources, materials, residual flows, services, personnel and facilities. For some companies, there is a great demand for materials, resources or extra manpower, while for other organizations equipment is idle or staff are temporarily available.

Think very concretely about: forklift trucks, storage space, parking spaces, partial mobility, residual flows and materials, transport capacity, meeting rooms, surplus stock, knowledge, sustainable projects or business cases, workplaces, technical staff and warehouse employees, for example.

PARKSHARING SCAN

To accelerate this new and circular development from ownership to use, we have developed a ParkSharingScan. This allows companies to calculate in advance what they can potentially earn and save by sharing assets, materials, services and facilities, both in euros and in energy and CO2.

The first results of the SharingScan are already promising: 10.3 million euros potential savings in costs, 7.5 million CO2 savings and more than 11.5 million KwH in energy savings.

Laury Zwart's picture #CircularCity