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People get more connected and technology becomes part of our daily life. Between 2014 and 2015 there was a 27% growth of internet traffic in Amsterdam. Eleven out of fifteen Trans-Atlantic data cables are connected with or go through Amsterdam and the AMS-IX is the second largest internet exchange point in the world. In 2016 Amsterdam was ranked second in the European Digital City Index. Do you work on a smarter city? Share your technologies here!

Francien Huizing, Program and Communication Manager at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

‘Niemand wil in een Smart City wonen’

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Met de lancering van de Corona app is digitalisering van de publieke ruimte gesprek van de dag. Als stad en als regio staan we voor grote opgaven. De coronacrisis momenteel voorop, maar ook de energietransitie, de beweging naar een circulaire economie en naar schone mobiliteit zijn nog steeds zeer urgent.

Opgaven die stuk voor stuk samenkomen in de openbare ruimte. Hier leven, recreëren, werken, spelen en verplaatsen we onszelf. Maar zeker in de stad is die openbare ruimte schaars en voel je de krapte. Technologie kan helpen om slim om te gaan met de krapte en de kwaliteit van de openbare ruimte beter te maken, mits je het op de juiste manier inzet. Niemand wil immers in een Smart City wonen. Wel in een veilige, schone, inspirerende en gezellige stad.

Op uitnodiging van Philip Vincent Fokker schreef ik dit artikel voor magazine Stadswerk#9. Een special over Smart City. Lees waarom een breed palet aan waarden voorop stellen belangrijk is. En hoe je de kracht van de samenleving kunt gebruiken voor waardevolle innovatie.

Met mooie voorbeelden van onze partners. Nemo Catalyst voor de Digitale Perimeter. Een Smart Parking pilot door gemeente Haarlemmermeer en de Druktemeter op het Marineterrein.

Lees hier het hele artikel

Francien Huizing's picture #Citizens&Living
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

The Journey Continues — The Road to Smart City Live Reveals Lessons Learned and Opportunities for Follow-up

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The Road to Smart City Live was a three day program that featured more than 40 sessions covering a wide variety of smart city and urban innovation topics including smart governance, data platforms, digital twins, smart mobility and living labs. The goal was to bring together and connect the Dutch and Nordic smart city ecosystems, facilitate knowledge exchange, and help establish new collaboration opportunities.

The program was held in the lead up to this year’s digital alternative to the World Smart City Expo, Smart City Live. Amsterdam Smart City contributed to the program by organizing daily recap sessions together with Amsterdam Trade & Innovate and Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO).  The intention was to create a casual setting for participants to reflect on lessons learned and discuss opportunities for follow-up.

Here are six key outcomes from the recap sessions:

  1. Outdated Regulations — Cities and innovators are struggling with outdated regulations.  The role of governments should be to ensure the right regulations are in place for stimulating the transition to sustainable and liveable cities.  This is much more important and effective than facilitating specific pilots, which can be left to the market when the right regulations and incentives are in place.  However, changing regulations is easier said than done.  The City of Amsterdam is collecting input on what regulatory changes need to be overcome to facilitate the energy transition.
  2. Public-Private Collaboration — Despite a strong appetite for public-private collaboration, organizing it in practice remains a challenge.  City of Amsterdam has developed innovative procurement programs like Startup in ResidenceInnovatie Partners and AI4Cities to enable collaboration with start-ups and scale-ups. And, the City of Amsterdam is now sharing these tools and lessons learned nationally and internationally, for example through the Startup in Residence Toolkit.
  3. Post Corona Recovery — How can the corona emergency be used to implement and accelerate ambitions for circularity and sustainability?  FME hosted a session exploring best practices which can help cities recover from corona and build back better.  FME will facilitate follow-up discussion and exchange among parties interested in collaborating on post-corona recovery.
  4. Digital Transition — Digital technology is increasingly part of all aspects of urban life and software innovation is key to a safe, responsible and inclusive digital transition. ITEA is currently preparing several innovative projects on topics like smart mobility and future of work which are still open for input from potential partners.
  5. Digital Inclusion & Data Control — Covid-19 has deepened the digital divide and highlighted the need for building digitally inclusive cities.  In order to become a digitally inclusive city, the City of Eindhoven is working to ensure all citizens have access to digital tools and are aware of what’s happening with their data.
  6. Scaling Living Labs — Netherlands and Sweden are leaders in smart city pilots and living labs, but in both countries scaling remains a challenge. While some stakeholders express “pilot fatigue”, others argue that this great diversity of pilots (including many failures) is an indicator of a healthy innovation ecosystem.  Cleantech Scandinavia and RVO are looking for ways to better capture and share lessons learned from past pilot projects, and ways to "resuscitate" and scale them when appropriate.

The Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO) collaborated with ITEA, Cleantech Scandinavia and the cities of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht, Eindhoven and The Hague to facilitate The Road to Smart City Live.  Video recordings from the different sessions will be made available in the upcoming weeks via the b2match platform.

For more information about any of the above lessons learned or follow-up opportunities, please connect with cornelia@amsterdamsmartcity.com.

Did you participate in (The Road to) Smart City Live?  Are there more insights or opportunities for follow-up which you would like to share with the community? Share your feedback in the comments below.

Cornelia Dinca's picture #Citizens&Living
Ahmed Larouz, Founder at Inclusive Algorithm, posted

Looking for partners on Inclusive and AI

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With Inclusive Algorithm, we would like to bring more inclusion and diversity in Artificial Intelligence revolution and business.

Our main objective is to generate more network and knowledge in the Artificial Intelligence field to better understand how artificial intelligence, algorithms and big data can be ethically developed for societal benefit by involving the marginalized groups (groups with migrant backgrounds & bi-culturals).

We just started this initiative and we are building alliances with people believing in our cause. Please feel welcome to reach out if you think we can add value to the work you do or vice versa.

Ahmed Larouz's picture #Citizens&Living
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

How this new platform contributes to better streets, neighbourhoods and cities

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Today, in a liveshow together with BTG and the City of Almere, aired from Pakhuis de Zwijger, Leonie van den Beuken, program director, officially launched the new Amsterdam Smart City platform.

Now and in the future we want to live and work in healthy, livable, vibrant cities. These are the places where we live, work, play and move. But certainly in the city, public space is scarce and you can feel the density. Cities are getting busier and we are experiencing the effects of climate change and pollution. Changes in this are not made very fast and we have to go through a lot of barriers. Technology can help to deal with the shortage of space and improve the quality of public space, if you use technology in the right way. After all, nobody wants to live in a Smart City. We do want to live in a safe, clean and pleasant city.

Another barrier for change in cities is collaboration. The challenges of today's cities require collaboration between governments, knowledge institutions, companies and residents. But many parties who need each other do not know each other, do not know how to find each other or have different interests. Collaboration with each other requires a different mindset, the mindset to do it together and not alone.

Collaboration
And that is where Amsterdam Smart City comes into play. We are working on the smart, green and healthy future of the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area. We do this together: close by in your own street and in the region. Fortunately, our city and region are full of active communities, social organizations, cooperatives and entrepreneurs who want to contribute to this. Together they make better streets, neighborhoods and cities and are of great importance to realize the city of the future.

At Amsterdam Smart City we have developed a way to mobilize this power of society. We bring these companies, public institutions and residents to shape the cities of the future. We do this by offering an open and safe place where connection and collaboration can develop. We have been doing this for 11 years, 4 of them also online. A large community is active on the online platform. More than 8,000 innovators in total. People who meet, show what they do and help each other across the Amsterdam and Dutch borders.

New online platform!
This new platform offers more possibilities to stay up to date on specific topics, to share with an interested target group what you do yourself and to find each other. We have been working on it for a while and are very curious what our network, including you!, thinks about it! If you were already a member of the community, please log in again with a new password. If you were not a member yet, sign up now!

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Official launch of this new online platform!

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Today, in a liveshow together with BTG and the City of Almere, aired from Pakhuis de
Zwijger, Leonie van den Beuken, program director, officially launched the new
Amsterdam Smart City platform.

The first contribution? Made by the community!!

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Launch of this new online platform tomorrow! Join the event *in Dutch*

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Tomorrow morning we will officially launch this new online platform during the event 'Mindset voor een Menselijke Slimme stad'. It promises to become a really interesting event about the changes our world needs, the diverse values we need to achieve change, how to strengthen each other and a good dose of inspiration.

Want to join? Then join us from 09.30h onwards:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85274832895. Note: the event will be in Dutch!

Program
09.30 uur - opening
09.45 uur - keynote and Q&A Klaas van Egmond
10.15 uur - breakouts
10.40 uur - break
10.45 uur - start-up pitches, with Seenons, Asset Hubble and Geofluxus
11.10 uur - launch Amsterdam Smart City platform

More info, check https://amsterdamsmartcity.com/updates/event/de-mindset-voor-een-menselijke-slimme-stad.

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #CircularCity
Jeffrey Bartels, Edmij , posted

Cleaner en cheaper charging EV with realtime energyprices

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Normally, people come home from work and charge their EV immediately. Current grid
systems can handle these new flows in power hardly. Smart Charging means that
you postpone EV charging to timeslots with lower demand. This stabilize the grid
and the EV owner can charge at lower, and even negative prices.

Edmij, together with Sensoria, developed a way to charge at realtime power prices per
quarter of an hour. At September 25th, they initially postpone charging and
starts charging at times with negative prices. Balancing the grid with smart
charging brings benefits to the EV owner and the grid operator: a win-win!

Jeffrey Bartels's picture #Energy
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

A new Amsterdam Smart City platform coming up!

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You’re probably already familiar with our online platform to share your news, projects and events with the Amsterdam Smart City community. Or you use this website to find news about smart cities, check out upcoming events and read about our organisation.

There are some changes on the way… Soon we will launch a brand new platform!!

Amsterdamsmartcity.com

We all want to live and work in a healthy city and region, now and in the future. Cities are getting busier and we are experiencing the effects of climate change and pollution. That is why we need solutions to guarantee a livable future. Technology is not the challenge here. Real progress can be made in finding, connecting and collaborating with likeminded people and organizations.

Why a new platform

Four years ago the new amsterdamsmartcity.com was launched in the Johan Cruijff ArenA. Not your ordinary website, but a unique interactive platform in the smart city sector. To tackle the challenges we are facing in cities, we need each other. Our platform helped a smart city community to find each other, share, connect and make an impact together! Soon more than 600 people joined the community and shared their work to make better streets, neighbourhoods and cities. And the amount of people grew more and more.

The look and feel of the first ASC community platform, three years ago

Now, four years later the Amsterdam Smart City expanded to more than 8000 people, 300+ projects and organizations and daily contributions. The platform is visited by people from all over the world. We got in touch with a brand new group of innovators, made it possible to connect them to our existing community, grew a network. Now it’s time to innovate the platform for the innovators, right?!

What’s new?

The community is growing, contributions are increasing, and more information is displayed on the platform. Therefore we are making an alternative that improves the overview and gives you control over the e-mails that are sent. And because the smart city field is a diverse field, with lots of themes, challenges and angles, we will help you reach the content that is of your specific interest.

Furthermore we hope to show you more of the program of Amsterdam Smart City. We are an open innovation platform and workspace for partners and the community. We facilitate collaboration in various types of events, of which a lot is done offline. And we want to involve you more in what’s happening offline in the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area.

Welcome!

A platform that will give you a better overview, helps you to connect to likeminded people and looks great! A platform with personalized content and e-mails, but also the occasional outside-your-bubble content. In the onboarding we will help you to get to know all the features. But more on that later!

We are looking forward to welcoming you on the new platform from the 17th of November and look forward to your feedback!

Please note: the website will be offline for a while on the 12th of November. At the end of the day, we will be back with the new platform. As a member of our community, you will automatically receive an e-mail to reactivate your account.
Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Jochem Kootstra, Redacteur at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

Research accelerates the sustainability of heating

AUAS contributes to accelerated roll-out of sustainable low-temperature heating networks in HeatNet project

The international research project HeatNet is all about making heat more sustainable. Less use of natural gas and more use of sustainable heat sources such as the residual heat from data centres. The project aimed to accelerate the roll-out of heating networks in urban areas. And that has been a success! Not only have new heating networks been developed in six European cities, the participating partners have gained knowledge about operating smartly in complex urban transitions. The professors and researcher involved from the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (AUAS) talk about the approach and the insights gained.

The role of the AUAS in the research project involves leading evaluations. During six evaluation meetings over three years, the partners reflected on their process of learning from each other and helping each other move forward. Professor of Energy and Innovation, Renée Heller: “As an evaluator, we not only wanted to determine how it went afterwards. But in accordance with the aim of this Interreg project – transnational learning – we embarked on a continuous learning process with each other.”

ON THE SHOULDERS OF GIANTS
This helps the pilot partners gain insights and build on each other’s discoveries. Frank Suurenbroek, professor of Spatial Urban Transformation: “In such complex transition projects, there is so much to consider. This process-based evaluation approach helps you gain insight into the issues you are facing. Such transitions are not a linear process and the insights cannot always be translated directly to other projects. But this approach does make complex processes navigable. It offers pathways for innovation that you can consider.”

The researchers translated this knowledge into various publications and guides, which have been made available to parties dealing with the roll-out of a heating network. Suurenbroek: “The Stakeholder Guide is also interesting for all parties that work on complex urban transitions.” Lecturer-researcher Egbert-Jan van Dijck was responsible for the development of the Stakeholder Guide.

“The heat transition requires an innovation at system level. Therefore, we carried out an extensive stakeholder analysis at meso-level,” explains Van Dijck. “It not only provides an impression of the individuals and organisations involved at the energy sector level, but also of their role in the chain, their interests and concerns. This step towards a situational analysis has enabled us to outline a holistic picture and carry out an in-depth analysis of barriers to the development of the new generation of heating and cooling networks in terms of finance, legislation and regulations and organisation.”

INVOLVING STUDENTS
“We are further expanding this analysis for education.” Van Dijck: Besides the human elements, we also analyse non-human elements, such as buildings, technologies, infrastructure, energy sources and subsurface. These are just as important in determining the situation as the human elements. For example, the pipes for a heating network cannot be laid through a river or a railway track. You need to be aware of these barriers.” Instead of just the people or the stakeholders, students see a much more complete situation at a glance. This goes for fourth-year students as well as second-year students.

Heller: “Several students have used this project for their graduation thesis. Students have even travelled to Ireland on their own initiative to learn more about the energy and heating situation there and to interview partners.”

ROLL-OUT OF HEATING NETWORKS
“There is a lot involved in creating a heating network,” says Heller. “Considering the complexity, it is unusual and significant that all six partners have succeeded in doing so in such a short space of time. It would be a shame not to use the valuable sources of heat available in a country. Data centres, for example, have a huge amount of heat left over. The roll-out of one heating network to multiple heating networks helps us to use available heat sources to increase sustainability and reduce our CO2 emissions.”

INTERDISCIPLINARY AND CROSS-THEMATIC
The HeatNet project is a good example of interdisciplinary collaboration between two research groups with different specialist knowledge. Frank Suurenbroek: “While the implementation of a heating network may appear to be a technical project, it is also an urban transformation process.” Heller adds: “Urban transition involves projects in which taking the energy leap seems the obvious choice, but where there is still little attention for the heat transition, while a great opportunity exists in that respect. Through our collaboration, we have seized that opportunity.”

Jochem Kootstra's picture #Energy
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Smart City Handbook Thailand

The UK Embassy in Bangkok has produced an awesome detailed handbook about smart city initiatives, policies and methods in Thailand.

It’s really well written and the authors worked closely with depa and Smart City Thailand Office to produce this really wonderful account. Please download and take a look!

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #DigitalCity
Kristina Gorr, Communications Manager , posted

MozFest's Call for Session Proposals is OPEN!

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MozFest is a unique hybrid: part art, tech and society convening, part maker festival, and the premiere gathering for activists in diverse global movements fighting for a more humane digital world.

That’s why I’m excited to invite you and your community to participate in the first-ever virtual MozFest! There will also be a local taster event in Amsterdam.

Submit A Session Idea for MozFest This Year: mzl.la/proposals2021

We’re excited to use the programming that we’ve honed over a decade of festivals – participant-led sessions, immersive art exhibits, space for spontaneous conversations, inspiring Dialogues & Debates – to address current and global crises. Through our Call for Session Proposals (where you're invited to propose an interactive workshop to host at the festival), we’ll seek solutions together, through the lens of trustworthy artificial intelligence.

Anyone can submit a session – you don’t need any particular expertise, just a great project or idea and the desire to collaborate and learn from festival participants.

If you or someone you know is interested in leading a session at MozFest this year, you can submit your session idea here! The deadline is November 23.

Details and submission page: mzl.la/proposals2021

Kristina Gorr's picture #DigitalCity
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Join CityFlows Webinar #2 Big Data & IoT for Crowd Management on October 13

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What are best practice and lessons learned when it comes to data collection and management for crowd management? CityFlows project partners will share their experience during the second CityFlows webinar on Tuesday, October 13. Join in and contribute to the discussion with fellow crowd management practitioners and researchers.

Program
11:50 – 12:00 Zoom meeting room open
12:00 – 12:05 Welcome & introductions
12:05 – 12:20 Best practices & lessons learned from Barcelona by Jordi Ortuño, Maziar Ahmadi & Chloe Cortés
12:20 – 12:35 Data source integration for tourism flows governance and safety by Mauro Annunziato & Piero De Sabbata
12:35 – 12:40 Reflection from Amsterdam
12:40 – 13:00 Q&A with the audience
13:00 Program end

For more information and registration visit the CityFlows project page: https://cityflows-project.eu/event/webinar-2/

Cornelia Dinca's picture #DigitalCity
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

EC 2020 Strategic Foresight Report: Charting the course towards a more resilient Europe

This first annual Strategic Foresight Report outlines how foresight will inform
policies with a view to strengthening the EU’s resilience in four interrelated
dimensions: social and economic, geopolitical, green, and digital. It analyses the EU’s
resilience in response to the COVID-19 crisis in the context of the acceleration or deceleration
of relevant megatrends, long-term driving forces that will likely have a large influence on
the future. This Communication shows how policies to improve resilience, by mitigating
vulnerabilities and strengthening capacities, can open new opportunities in each of the four
dimensions. This includes reconsidering the future of wellbeing, work, labour markets and
skills, reconfiguring global value chains, supporting democracy, reforming our rules-based
trading system, building alliances in emerging technologies, and investing in the green and
digital transitions.
This new focus on resilience calls for close monitoring. This Communication proposes
to move towards resilience dashboards, which, once fully developed in cooperation with the
Member States and other key stakeholders, should be used for assessing the vulnerabilities
and capacities of the EU and its Member States in each of the four dimensions. Such analysis
can help answer the question: are we, through our policies and recovery strategy, effectively
making the EU more resilient?
The strategic foresight agenda will encompass horizontal foresight activities and
thematic forward-looking exercises. For the upcoming year, these include: open strategic
autonomy, the future of jobs and skills for and in the green transition, and deepening the
twinning of the digital and green transitions. This agenda will bring a dynamic perspective
of synergies and trade-offs among EU policy goals, thereby supporting the coherence of EU
policies.

https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/files/strategic_foresight_report_2020_1.pdf

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #Energy
Folkert Leffring, Digital Media Manager , posted

Amsterdam and Helsinki launch AI registers to detail city systems

The cities of Helsinki and Amsterdam have worked together to each launch a first-of-its-kind Artificial Intelligence Register.

“Together with the city of Helsinki, we are on a mission to create as much understanding about algorithms as possible and be transparent about the way we – as cities – use them,” commented Touria Meliani, Deputy Mayor of Amsterdam (Digital City).

Folkert Leffring's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Amsterdam and Helsinki first cities in the world to launch open AI register

The City of Amsterdam, Helsingin kaupunki – Helsingfors stad – City of Helsinki, in collaboration with Saidot, launched the first Public AI Register. The Algorithm Register is an overview of the artificial intelligence systems and algorithms used by the Cities of Amsterdam and Helsinki. Through the register, you can get acquainted with the quick overviews of the city's algorithmic systems or examine their more detailed information based on your own interests.

If you're interested in learning more, here's something for you. The new white paper that was co-written by Linda van de Fliert, Pasi Rautio and Meeri Haataja. They really hope this will part some conversation and most importantly, help other government organisations address #transparency and take their first steps in implementing #AI #governance.

You can also give feedback and thus participate in building human-centered algorithms in Amsterdam. The register is still under development.

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #DigitalCity
Audrie van Veen, International Strategist at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Helsinki publishes guide to agile urban pilots

How to get the most out of urban experimentation? The guidebook for urban developers sums up learnings and experiences from agile piloting in Helsinki.
The Pocket Book for Agile Piloting shares the experiences from Smart Kalasatama and Jätkäsaari Mobility Lab in Helsinki and condenses the key learnings in a pragmatic and easily digestible way. Free download via Forum Virium

Audrie van Veen's picture #DigitalCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

WeMakeThe.City RESET: Digital Rights

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After two successful editions, the WeMakeThe.City festival is heading for 2025 as a biennale: the 750th anniversary of Amsterdam. This year the uncertain future of our city and metropolitan region was discussed in a 12-hour livecast marathon on the 21st of September. The WeMakeThe.City theme ‘Reset’ brings together genius thinking, imagination and creativity to formulate alternative perspectives for action. How are we going to do things differently in the coming years? How do we work together to make our metropolis fairer, more inclusive, more sustainable, more climate-resilient, safer, more successful and happier? After all, together we make the city of, for and by everyone!

During last spring's lockdown, it became even clearer how much we depend on the digital world. We meet, chat and date in front of the screen. A solution to combat the spread of Covid-19 is also being sought in the digital domain. These developments have raised the privacy issue again: how can people's data rights be protected? Such as anonymity, transparency and control over data. Time for a good conversation about values and the importance of digital civil rights.

The session kicks off with Marleen Stikker, director of Waag and Ger Baron, Chief Technology Officer of the City of Amsterdam. Marleen explains what our digital human rights are. ‘These are the same rights just as in the analogue world. Where there is relatively much attention for analogue human rights, our civil rights in the digital domain have run wild, too little attention has been paid to this. Let's reclaim those rights! It is for example about the right to be forgotten, the right to be anonymous, but most important to me is digital sovereignty. Everyone should have the possibility to have insights in their own actions online.’

Ger agrees with Marleen. According to him, governments, and cities as well, collects too many data about residents and the public space without even knowing what they want to do with these data.’ The reason to collect them should be to learn something specific that you can improve or help people. Helping people with the collection of data also brings in new dilemmas. The city used to have a collaboration with energy providers for example. Once someone didn’t pay for the energy service, they sent out a message to the city administration. The City could then prevent someone get evicted from his/her home.

This example is not enough reason for Marleen to collect the data: ‘To me, this sounds as if we didn’t invest in our society. We could have helped these people as well if they had adequate supervision or guidance. In last years, we invested heavily in the digital domain and we made budget cuts on home care, debt counselling and community police officers. Digital solutions are not always the best solutions! Especially not when all kinds of companies have data without people knowing about this.’ Ger: ‘To a certain point I agree with this point. Digital rights also include rights to know about the data that is collected, why this is and what you can do about this. This is currenty not transparant at all, even though the City of Amsterdam is becoming more and more about about his.

Marleen: ‘I see the City of Amsterdam going in the right direction, by starting for example the Coalition for Digital Rights. However, the steps in this direction go really slow, especially in politics. This way, it remains unclear what rules companies dealing with personal data should obey. That’s why Marleen also calls on politicians in The Hague: guarantee digital human rights by imposing conditions on the market.’

Next up is Miram Rasch, researcher and teacher at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and writer of the book ‘Friction. Ethics in times of dataism. Her book opens with a story about escaping the eyes of data collectors and algorithms. She states this is only possible at home. And even there, it becomes harder. ‘We have smart meters, smartphones, smart tvs. It is not clear why these devices need to collect data, with whom they share them. We don’t know now, but especially we don’t know in the future. Everybody has something to hide, because we don’t know yet what we should hide. Of course you have to inform yourself about the conditions you’re accepting. However, this is not easy at all. Try to read the Terms and Conditions of the services you use, the texts are too long and complicated. Unfortunately it can take a long before something changes. The few individuals who are conscious about the digital world, won’t change it. We need rules and regulations! But we know from the past, that maybe something heavy has to happen before people open their eyes.’

Jim Boevink, advisor Taskforce Digital Safety at the City of Amsterdam, starts an intermezzo about the right to be anonymous. Marleen Stikker: ‘People who want to abuse others, are free to hide themselves. This is because platforms are not responsible for the content their users post. They earn money with these users, they are their business models. But they they are not responsible for things happening on their platform. This is the first thing that has to change. The legal system is not in order. Make them responsible for the content on their platforms.’ M**arleen: ‘And good to emphasize: someone who is critical about the digital domain and the internet, is not necessarily against the digital world. We only have to make the internet safe and reliable!’**

Want to watch the livecast (in Dutch) yourself? Check <https://dezwijger.nl/programma/reset-digital-rights>.

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #DigitalCity
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder , posted

ModelMe3D - City Information Modeling !!!DEMO!!!

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Howdy - this Friday 25.09 @12h we'll be giving a demo to show you MM3D - a new “white board” for city information modeling that can empower you or any other project stakeholders to plan, collaborate & share projects. In this webinar we’ll show you what all these features and functionalities mean for your own real-world projects. We’ll be using the Marineterrein (former navy base) in the heart of Amsterdam as our user case. Interested? Grab a sandwich and sign up here: bit.ly/MM3D_MT

Tom van Arman's picture #DigitalCity
Yeni Joseph, Public Policy Manager , posted

Applications open: CATALYST 2020 live from New York - a three-week virtual program for Dutch scale-ups

We are calling all Dutch scale-ups with ambitions to scale internationally to apply for the BENELUX CATALYST 2020, a fast-paced three-week, no-equity based virtual accelerator program, taking place in November 2020 live from New York. Applications are now open!

The Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO) are collaborating with partners in New York and from Belgium and Luxembourg for the Benelux Catalyst program, targeting high-growth tech scale-ups from the Benelux and working together to kick start their international growth.
About the program
The Benelux Catalyst is a three-week virtual accelerator program from November 2-20 2020 for scale-ups from the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg. The program is designed to have a transformative impact on the mindset, ambition and international expansion strategies of participating companies. The daily virtual sessions are live from New York (Monday-Thursday), combining workshops, peer insights, office hours and on-demand content.
· Company specific matchmaking and personal introductions
· Presentations and workshops by experts and service providers
· Knowledge sharing and peer mentoring by fellow entrepreneurs
· Access to the larger NYC community through events
Program fee
Given the small cohort size and the tailor-made experience for this program, the Consulate General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands will select 2-3 Dutch scale-ups to participate in the program and sponsor the majority of the program fee per selected company. This means that selected Dutch scale-ups pay a contribution of €750 per selected company to join the Catalyst virtual accelerator program (November 2-20 2020).

Want to know more?
Have a look at the two-pager attached.

Yeni Joseph's picture #DigitalCity
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

A Successful Launch of the CityFlows Webinar Series — Crowd Management in Times of Corona

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On Tuesday, 8 September, forty-five participants gathered for the first CityFlows webinar on the topic of crowd-management in response to corona. Speakers came from three partner cities: Eelco Thiellier, Project Manager Crowd Monitoring System Amsterdam (CMSA); Valentino Sevino, Mobility Planning Director at City of Milan’s Environmental Mobility and Territory Agency (AMAT); and Aina Pedret, Mobility & Tourism Specialist at the City of Barcelona.

The participants were CityFlows project partners (37%), crowd-management researchers or academics (17%), crowd-management professionals working for public authorities (13%), crowd-management professionals working for companies or start-ups (10%), non-professionals interested in the topic (13%), and other (10%).

The meeting represented a successful launch of the EIT-KIC CityFlows webinar series which will continue with additional webinars in October, November and December.

Following a brief introduction to the CityFlows project, Eelco Thieller shared how the City of Amsterdam has quickly adapted its crowd monitoring infrastructure to respond to the corona crisis. Eelco showed the techniques that are used and how they are instituted throughout the city in crowded locations, or “hot spots”, such as shopping districts and market areas, the Red Light District, and in parks and at event locations. The focus is always on managing crowds or flows of people in the most privacy-preserving way with infrared sensors being a good example of how this is done in Vondelpark. Eelco also described the predictive models that were developed using the data which are helpful with determining what crowd-management actions should be undertaken by the City to ensure the health and safety of the residents and visitors.

Valentino Sevino shared a broader perspective on how the City of Milan has used data and modelling to respond to the corona emergency. Valentino showed how the modal-share in the city had drastically changed since the end of February through June as a result of the corona crisis. This shed light on levels on congestion throughout the city and showed a large reduction in all modalities during the lock down. Following the lock-down, public transport began operating at 25% which then required the city to undertake a complete rethinking of the mobility system with the goal of focusing on more temporal distribution, promotion of remote working, and promotion of active transport through street space reallocation to non-motorized transport. The data collected enabled them to predict and plan for different scenarios, especially considering the goal of abiding by social distancing guidelines during rush hours.

Aina Pedret from the City of Barcelona responded to the first two presentations by reflecting on the global challenge of ensuring confidence and safety for people in response to corona. To ensure this confidence and safety for both locals and tourists, the City of Barcelona is developing an application showing real time data of busyness at “hot spots”. And similar to the City of Amsterdam, the City of Barcelona is using cameras to monitor and manage occupancy and crowds at busy locations such as markets.

The webinar ended with an open discussion facilitated by Dorine Duives, CityFlows Principle Investigator at TU Delft.

Did you miss the webinar? It is possible to watch the recording via https://vimeo.com/460939134

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CityFlows is an EIT-KIC project aims to improve the liveability of crowded pedestrian spaces through the use of Crowd Monitoring Decision Support Systems to manage pedestrian flows. The project is led by AMS Institute and brings together crowd-management and mobility practitioners and researchers in Amsterdam, Barcelona and Milan. The CityFlows project tests and evaluates various innovative crowd monitoring techniques in real-life settings where large crowds meet, such as mass events, tourist spaces and transfer hubs. The CityFlows project also prepares a CM-DSS for market launch which incorporates state-of-the-art monitoring techniques.
Join us for one or all of the next CityFlows webinars:
• Tuesday, 13 October, 2020 – 12:00-13:00 CET
• Tuesday, 3 November – 15:00-16:00 CET
• Tuesday, December 1 – 15:00-16:00 CET

Are you a practitioner or researcher working on a relevant crowd-management project and would like to share your work and findings with the CityFlows network? Send a short email explaining your project to CityFlows Communications Officer, Cornelia Dinca via cornelia.dinca@ams-institute.org.

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