Digital City

People get more connected and technology becomes part of our daily life. Between 2014 and 2015 there was a 27% growth of internet traffic in Amsterdam. Eleven out of fifteen Trans-Atlantic data cables are connected with or go through Amsterdam and the AMS-IX is the second largest internet exchange point in the world. In 2016 Amsterdam was ranked second in the European Digital City Index. Do you work on a smarter city? Share your technologies here!

Highlight from Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

Crowd Monitoring Summer Survey (1 min.)

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For those of you who know, Marineterrein Amsterdam has been a test area to explore responsible counting of crowds (big and small) in a living lab environment. Summer temperatures are bringing large numbers people to the Marineterrein to cool off - but earlier this winter / spring, the crowd monitor revealed some fun facts about how people made use the inner-city living lab during the Covid19 lockdown.

This summer we’re collecting feedback from the Marineterrein community and the general public. Have you ever been to the Marineterrein? If so, how do you feel about counting people in public space? In this 1 minute survey we ask 5 simple yes/no questions to help us improve your experience on the smart city campus.

Your help is appreciated!

Tom van Arman's picture #Citizens&Living
Highlight from Ben Davis, Design , posted

How Smart Cities & Technology Are Evolving

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Over the centuries, each urban expansion was followed by a period of catching up to face a new, more complex reality. We still experience it today when we know that more than half a million people sleep on the streets in the United States every night and that rents are rising faster than incomes.

In London, between 1997 and 2016, the number of jobs and the population increased by 40% and 25% respectively, while accommodation capacity only increased by 15%. The average American employee's commuting time has reached new records: an average of 225 hours per year (or more than nine days in total) is spent on the road or in transport.

As in the past, the current reality and the future of a physical place requires a good understanding of the place in question. This is why the meaning of place in a city stems both from its logistical environment and from the social and emotional context that unites its inhabitants.

What smart city technonoly does in percentage

The explosion of integrated sensors, mobile devices, high-speed wireless connections, combined with exponential growth in data and sophisticated analysis tools, offers geospatial perspectives that go beyond the theoretical framework. This led to the birth of “smart cities”. McKinsey estimates that the technologies deployed by smart cities can reduce mortality by 8 to 10%, improve rescue response times by 20 to 35%, decrease travel times by 15 to 20%, decrease by 8 to 15% disease burden and 10-15% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

A new generation of smart cities

Despite some setbacks here and there, on a global or national scale, metropolises, communities and neighborhoods have followed the path of progress, with more concrete results. According to many futurists, we are in the midst of a new generation of smart cities with a more pragmatic sense of city management. Cities that not only apply intelligence to their macro-systems, but seek to optimize micro-sites for global transformations.

A true smart city uses dynamic 3D digital basemaps to obtain real-time information on the condition of neighborhoods, residential areas or buildings down to the lowest level (floor, corridor and housing) or highest (above existing structures such as the roof).

By making all this information accessible to managers; police officers, firefighters and first aid personnel, public transport employees, care providers, grocers and traders, distributors, teachers, social workers, and especially to the inhabitants, each individual will be able to know where the bus is and at what time it will arrive, where a leak has occurred on the water distribution network, in which car parks there are still free spaces,

The coronavirus pandemic has demonstrated the value of a collective city-wide solution, which involves knowing where people in difficulty are and how to help them. For Alison Brooks, a pioneer on innovative ideas:

As we have seen, a smart city must respond to four major challenges:

  • Operational Efficiency: Streamline business processes and workflows to improve decision making and locate resources for maximum benefit. The digital dashboard is the ideal tool for this. 
  • Data-driven performance: take advantage of data flows from the Internet of Things (IoT), mobile devices, but also sensors that are part of the city's infrastructure, vehicles and buildings, then analyze the whole this data thanks to artificial intelligence. This has made it possible to achieve concrete results such as the adaptive regulation of traffic lights, or real-time (and no longer static) decision-making at the scale of the city and professional services. 
  • Citizen involvement: Some smart cities of the first wave encountered cultural and societal obstacles in deploying the technology without asking the opinion of the inhabitants. True smart cities involve communities from the start, identifying the priorities of the inhabitants, responding to the specific concerns and needs of different groups and working for greater social equity. 
  • Planning and engineering: 3D modeling, profoundly transformed by the digital revolution and human-centered design, makes it possible to anticipate and mitigate economic, environmental or social upheavals and the resulting tensions. These cards, also known under the name of “digital twins”, take into account a multitude of elements (buildings, infrastructure, vegetation, transit, etc.) down to the smallest level (floor or room, for example). They are the underlying platform of the true smart city.

The history of our species, that is to say of human civilization, in fact merges with the history of the city ; both have the same Latin origin. The city and its systems have allowed a real concentration of resources and the emergence of an entrepreneurial spirit and collective creativity that have won over the entire planet. Thanks to powerful leaders who think outside the box and the cutting-edge tools available to us today and the lessons we have learned from this experience, we have the possibility of reinventing these systems to promote a fairer, more sustainable and more harmonious development model.

Note from ASC: Have a question? Let’s hear it in the comments.

Ben Davis's picture #DigitalCity
Sage Isabella, PhD Candidate at University of Twente, posted

Applications for Data Transparency in Public Space Conference (Virtual)

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Submissions due Aug 15th! Conference October 6-7th.

We are accepting abstracts for papers, posters/artwork, and workshops. The quality/uniqueness of work and adherence to conference theme is more important than credentials. As a reminder, your paper should address either (1) law and regulations, (2) data transparency in practice, or (3) possible futures. If you are unsure of whether or not to apply please email the conference organizers.

The NWO funded research group BRIDE (BRIdging Data in the built Environment) and AMS Institute’s Responsible Sensing Lab are coming together to co-host a conference on data transparency in public space.

Cities have increasingly been collecting and analyzing data generated
from sensors in public space. This conference will explore how data
collecting capabilities and uses are made available (and understandable)
to the general public.

Scholars, activists, legal experts, city planners, citizens, data scientists, and students will come together to better understand:

  1. the global legal status of data transparency in public space
  2. how data transparency in public space works in practice
  3. prototypes and ideas for the future based on the needs of the general public as well as corporate and governmental stakeholders.

We welcome you either virtually or in person with us in Amsterdam (limited "in-person" space available) to discuss and learn about these issues. If you wish to attend and not present send an email to dtps2021-bms@utwente.nl to stay updated!

Sage Isabella's picture Conference from Jul 29th to Aug 15th
Jet van Eeghen, Online communication advisor at Amsterdam Economic Board, posted

Gezocht: Stagiair(e) strategie-team

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Vanaf september 2021 hebben wij een stageplek voor een initiatiefrijke, meewerkende stagiair(e). Heb jij zin in een stage binnen het strategie-team waar je verschillende partijen leert kennen en je onderzoek doet naar innovatie voor een slimme, groene en gezonde toekomst van de Metropool Amsterdam? Dan zoeken we jou!

Het strategie-team van de Amsterdam Economic Board doet onderzoek naar drie maatschappelijke transities in de regio: Energie, Circulair en Digitaal. We werken met toekomstscenario’s en organiseren kennissessies om het gesprek over de toekomst van de economie te voeren met ons netwerk. Daarnaast verbinden we kennisinstellingen, overheden en bedrijven in de regio op strategisch niveau en stimuleren we innovatieve samenwerking tussen hen.

Klinkt dat als een uitdaging die jou goed ligt: Lees dan alles over deze stage-vacature.

Jet van Eeghen's picture #Citizens&Living
Jet van Eeghen, Online communication advisor at Amsterdam Economic Board, posted

Gezocht: Stagiair(e) Communicatie en Events

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Ben je bezig met een opleiding op het gebied van Communicatie en de organisatie van Events? Zoek je een leuke stage op een uitdagende plek op het Marineterrein in Amsterdam? Bij de Amsterdam Economic Board werk je mee aan een leefbare omgeving in de Amsterdamse metropoolregio. In ons team krijg je veel mogelijkheden om te leren, je verder te ontwikkelen en je netwerk te vergroten. Grijp deze kans aan en reageer op deze vacature.

Jet van Eeghen's picture #Citizens&Living
Zoë Spaaij, Project manager , posted

Summerschool 'Wie maakt de slimme stad leuk?'

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Het wordt druk, heel druk in Zuid-Holland. Meer woningen, meer mensen in de stad, meer auto’s op de weg – hoe houden we het leuk in de steden van Zuid-Holland? Dat ga jij oplossen tijdens de summerschool ‘Wie maakt de slimme stad leuk?’ op 23, 24 en 25 augustus 2021 in Zuid-Holland. We onderzoeken in 3 dagen hoe we steden slimmer, mooier en leuker kunnen maken.

MEER INFORMATIE & AANMELDEN

Waar gaat het over?

De provincie Zuid-Holland staat voor een grote opgave. Het aantal inwoners stijgt de komende decennia met tien tot vijftien procent. Dat betekent meer woningen, meer mensen op straat, meer fietsers, langere files, drukker openbaar vervoer, vollere parken, etc. En dat terwijl juist elke vrije vierkante meter wordt volgebouwd. In de dichtstbevolkte provincie van ons land moet je op een slimme manier omgaan met de ruimte die je wél hebt.

De vraag is hoe digitalisering en technologisering bijdraagt aan het leefbaar houden van de stad. Daar wordt volop mee geëxperimenteerd in het Living Lab Scheveningen. Met 763 sensoren, robots die afval oprapen en geluidscamera’s die overlast kunnen voorspellen, is hier de slimme stad in de werking. Maar wat kan er nog meer? Wat is de next-level smart city?

Dat ga jij onderzoeken tijdens deze summerschool. Drie dagen lang ga je samen met je team aan de slag met de vraag:

💡 Hoe kunnen technologische en/of digitale oplossingen bijdragen aan een positieve beleving van de openbare ruimte, waardoor verdichtende steden prettig en leefbaar blijven?

In multidisciplinaire teams ga jij een concept bedenken en uitwerken die antwoord geeft op deze vraag. Het antwoord moet zo concreet mogelijk zijn en haalbaar, schaalbaar en deelbaar. En we gaan natuurlijk op bezoek bij Living Lab Scheveningen om met eigen ogen te zien hoe slimme toepassingen kunnen bijdragen aan de leefbaarheid van de stad.

Voor wie?

Je bent geschikt als je begrijpt dat er voor ingewikkelde problemen geen eenvoudige antwoorden volstaan. En soms ook wel. Je hebt een achtergrond in:

  • URBANISME: ruimtelijke ordening, planologie, stedenbouw
  • SOCIAAL: sociologie, sociale geografie
  • DESIGN: product design, multimedia, marketing
  • TECH: geo en media design, game design, computer science / IT en software developing
  • of iets anders interessants, want verder out-of-the-box is ook welkom.

Wij zijn blij met omdenkers en dwarskijkers. Je studeert of bent net aan het werk, je hebt een hbo of wo-opleiding en bent niet ouder dan 27 jaar. Aan deze summerschool kunnen 24 jongprofessionals deelnemen. Deelnemen is gratis.

Dit levert het jou op

TECHS:
Maak technische oplossingen die maatschappelijke impact hebben
En leer van de technische experts over nieuwe techtoepassingen

URBANISTEN:
Leer over de nieuwe ruimtelijke ordening
En over smart cities en de impact van digitalisering in de stad

En er is meer:
Werk aan concrete oplossingen
Ontwikkel je professionele en persoonlijke skills;
Ontmoet een netwerk van bedrijven en organisaties om je carrière een kick-start te geven;
En je hebt drie dagen plezier met leuke mensen van allerlei vakgebieden;
Maak kans op 2000 euro met je team (500 euro per persoon)!

Meld je nu aan

Meld je nu aan voor de summerschool ‘Wie maakt de slimme stad leuk?’ op 23, 24 en 25 augustus 2021 in Zuid-Holland. Kijk voor meer informatie op de website.

MEER INFORMATIE & AANMELDEN

Het Kennislab voor Urbanisme organiseert deze summerschool in opdracht van de Provincie Zuid-Holland en in samenwerking met Living Lab Scheveningen, gemeente Den Haag en Future City Foundation.

Masterclass / workshop from Aug 23rd to Aug 25th
Zola Can, Editorial office & Communication at Openresearch Amsterdam , posted

Openresearch: Make sure your theses gets read

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Are you worried that no one besides your supervisor will ever read your thesis? This year openresearch.amsterdam will publish all theses that are relevant for the greater Amsterdam area.

At openresearch already more than 2500 civil servants, academics and designers find each other’s work. The aim of the platform is to:

• Share knowledge
• Show relations between different kinds of knowledge
• Work together in research projects

A great place for students and starters to work on their own professional network in the city by sharing their work, in line with our motto: Dare to share.

Dare to share
So, is your thesis about the Herengracht in the 17th century, dyslexia in Amsterdam Zuidoost, the Amsterdam energy transition or another topic that relates to the city? Send your thesis to: openresearch@amsterdam.nl

For more information and terms and conditions, click here.

Something to share with your interns
Are you not a student, but do you work with graduating or graduated students in your organisation? Bringing this post to the attention of your colleagues is appreciated.

Note from ASC: Have a tip for Zola? Let’s hear it in the comments.

Zola Can's picture #Mobility
Liza Verheijke, Community Manager at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

Who should win the Dutch Applied AI Award?

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Last year, during the Month of the AAI in November, the Centre of Expertise Applied Artificial Intelligence (AUAS - Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences) presented the Dutch Applied AI Award for the first time. This year we are back for a second edition. The award is part of the Computable Awards and is for suppliers of AI solutions, start-ups in the AI field and good examples of the implementation of AI.

This award is jointly organized with AUAS, Computable and podcast De Dataloog . You can nominate an individual or organisation, based on a project you think has stood out in the past 12 months. The projects may have been particularly successful, innovative or extensive.

You can nominate until 16 August 2021

The winner will be announced on 2 November 2021 during a spectacular show in the Jaarbeurs Utrecht. Last year, healthcare platform DEARhealth won the Dutch Applied AI award. Who will walk away with the prize this year? 🙌🏻

About the Computable Awards

This will be the 16th year in a row that Computable will present the Computable Awards in November 2021. These prizes are awarded to companies, projects and individuals who, according to Computable readers, have clearly distinguished themselves in the past year.

An independent jury of experts will select five nominees for each award from the nominated parties. The ranking by the jury and the number of votes from Computable readers each determine half of which nominee will receive the award in November. The number of times a party is nominated for a nomination does not play a role, but the quality of the substantiation and information about the project mentioned does.

Liza Verheijke's picture #DigitalCity
Liza Verheijke, Community Manager at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

Comenius Leadership Fellow grant to make AUAS students AI-ready

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The Centre of Expertise Applied AI of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (AUAS) has been awarded a Comenius Leadership Fellow grant of €500,000 for the AI4Students project. Over the next three years, the project headed by Professor of Responsible AI Nanda Piersma intends to use the Comenius grant to equip AUAS students for a future in which artificial intelligence (AI) will play an increasingly important role.

The assessment committee of the Netherlands Initiative for Education Research (NRO) selected the project from a total of 15 applications and praised AI4Students for its innovative character and the expected benefits for students, lecturers and the professional field. “Because of the social relevance of the topic, the committee is confident that the outcomes will be valuable to students and lecturers as well as the professional field.”

AI-ready upon graduation

AI4Students is a project that should have an impact in all faculties of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. “We would like to ensure that all AUAS students are AI-ready by the time they graduate, not just with a general acquaintance with AI, but AI specifically geared to their field of study,” Piersma explains. “So it’s not about them studying with us first to become an accountant or physiotherapist, for example, and then having to take an additional training course as soon as they start their job. Instead, they should already be thinking with us about how AI is going to affect their job.”

The Comenius Leadership Fellow 2021 grant will enable Piersma to start fulfilling that ambition over the next three years. “What we want to do is start performing an AI impact scan for 9 degree programmes,” Piersma explains. “In what way is artificial intelligence going to impact a professional field? How will this affect what professionals need to be able to do, and what does that mean for the degree programme itself?”

Liza Verheijke's picture #Citizens&Living
Leonardo Passos, social entrepreneur , posted

DevOps Engineering

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Helo! I am a Computing student at the Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology.
I wonder if you would like to partner to create a DevOps Engineering company.

Code, communication, monitor, deployment, planning, infrastructure, networks.

I'm an entrepreneur and DevOps developer.
Send an email to create a DevOps project to leonardovieira21@hotmail.com

Leonardo Passos's picture #DigitalCity
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

ESPON needs your help to map digital innovation on the local level

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ESPON Programme and Open & Agile Smart Cities are looking for your help and insight!

As part of the ESPON DIGISER project (Digital Innovation in Governance and Public Service Provision) and beyond, we are collecting data on the practices and current situation of digital innovation in European cities, towns and regions.

The survey is available here until 9 July 2021:
 https://ec.europa.eu/eusurvey/runner/DIGIsurvey2021

The DIGISER project is an EU initiative run by the ESPON Programme and supported by the European Committee of the Regions, living-in.eu, EUROCITIES, ICLEI, 100 Intelligent Cities Challenge, Smart Cities Marketplace and Open and Agile Smart Cities.

The goal is to lay the foundations for future EU programs and initiatives that support municipalities in their digital transition. To do this, we need to know what is being done at local level. The survey is also the cornerstone of the annual index, which will help you understand the current state of your digital journey and help cities with to benchmark themselves against similar cities across Europe. By participating in the survey, you will get a better overview of your city's approach to digital innovation. The results of the survey can be used by local governments to apply for funding from future EU or national programmes.

And: There’s even a chance for you to win 1 of 5 reMarkable tablets as a little token of appreciation for your time!

Cornelia Dinca's picture #DigitalCity
Marije Wassenaar, Program Manager New Business Innovations at AMS Institute, posted

AMS Startup Booster '21- Open for applications

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The AMS Startup Βooster is an idea validation program focusing on the creation of startups that want to make an impact on city life and solve metropolitan challenges.

Do you have, or know someone who has, a great idea on urban challenges and want(s) to fast-track it to the next level? Then join our team of sustainability experts and business enthusiasts and we will help you boost your idea into a business.

Open for applications until August 29
The application form will remain open until August 29. The first week of September, we will select our top teams to join our program and coaching sessions.

September 2021 – December 2021
The program consists of six sessions, accompanied by peer-to-peer discussions and coaching sessions. All sessions will take place on Monday afternoons. We aim to bring the start-ups to the level where they have eliminated uncertainties, done a thorough customer discovery, formed a strong team and can venture out with a solid pitch and a minimum viable product. The sessions will be primarily online due to the uncertainty of COVID19, but when possible we will also have some live sessions at our institute in Amsterdam.

Note from ASC: Have a question? Let’s hear it in the comments.

Marije Wassenaar's picture #DigitalCity
Eve Logunova, Founder , posted

InnoHUB program: deep dive into Open Innovation, AI and Data

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**Our InnoHUB session, “Urban Resilience & Sustainable Societies”, is organized in partnership with #Fugro, the world’s leading Geodata specialist, collecting and analysing comprehensive information about the Earth and the structures built upon it. **

With the support of Fugro, we are able to offer a limited number of additional tickets for you and your peers to attend our InnoHUB sessions. Participation is free of charge. Please register to secure your spot and receive an invitation to our #InnoHUB #VR world. Join us from today for a deep dive into Open Innovation, AI & Data!

The workshop will be conducted by Fugro’s team:

* Neda Sepasian, PhD (Technology Innovation Manager, an established researcher, AI expert, and R&D Scientist) – “Digital transformation and AI in Fugro”
* Sudan Xu, PhD (Innovation Engineer, Computer Vision) – “#ML-based examples for Railways quality control”
* Yulia Melnikova (Innovation Engineer, Computer Vision) – “AI application for road quality surveys”
* Alexandra Cristobal (Data Scientist) – “Applying AI for marine and land site characterizations”
* Magdalena Drozdz (Geo-data Delivery Engine Manager) – “#Digitaltwins and Geo-data delivery”

The Host of the event is Robin Vergouwen, AI Video Assessment Lead at Incision and InnoHUB Core Team member at Women in AI.

Would you like to attend?Register here

Note from ASC: Have a question or want a bit more inforamtion? Let’s hear it in the comments.

Eve Logunova's picture Online event from Jun 29th to Jul 15th
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Demoday: Circular & Digital innovations

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In our program of Tuesday July 6th Circular will meet Digital. Demodays are part of our innovation process and intended to boost the progress of the various innovation projects. Always in a variety of ways and in a very positive and open vibe. Invitations are sent but we're always open to adding a few new names to the list.

We host these days every 8-10 weeks. During Demodays, community members pitch projects & ask for input, and in small groups we work on concrete questions that our partners put on the table.

Pitches to explore:

• Can we unify powerful, complex tech with a democratic society? – KNVI
Subsidy opportunities for innovation partners – City of Amsterdam
• Building bridges that stimulate bike use – Pontiflex
• How to take circularity and energy into account when it comes to data storage – A’dam Economic Board

Workshops:

Circular ICT - AMS Institute & Gemeente Amsterdam
De production, purchase and use of ICT equipment happens mostly in a well known linear model. But what if we could let the end user manage their hardware in a circular way? Together we'll identify what’s needed to come up with the ideal monitor for sustainable ICT.

Materials Passport – Provincie Noord-Holland
A materials passport could truly speed up circular construction. It gives insights on what’s deconstructed when demolition is taking place and reused in new designs. The different experiences with the Cruquiusbrug and the Bruggencampus Flevoland-Floriade will serve as examples to pinpoint challenges and opportunities.

Responsible IT en data – Hogeschool van Amsterdam
Building a responsible IT System isn’t done overnight. There’re equipment choices, energy use, privacy and security. Not all aspects get the same attention which has consequences for the transparency and accessibility. We'll work with the question: How can you truly built a responsible IT system?

Have a question? Let’s hear it in the comments!

Amsterdam Smart City's picture Meet-up on Jul 6th
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

City Deal “Smart City, This is How You Do It” Connects to International Best Practices

How can we learn from international smart city experiences to ensure that we do not keep reinventing the smart city wheel. In the City Deal “A Smart City, This Is How You Do It” 58 public and private parties are working together to collect, validate and scale smart city solutions in the Netherlands.

On 10 June, Future City Foundation (FCF) and Amsterdam Smart City (ASC) brought together more than 30 Dutch and international colleagues to connect the City Deal to international experiences and best practices. The session consisted of short pitches sharing the tools and solutions developed in the City Deal Working Groups. For every pitch the international experts were asked to share their experience with similar projects, and reflect on what is needed to improve and scale the solutions abroad.

1.     Open Urban Data Platform Tender

As more municipalities look to purchase urban data platforms, can we develop a generalized Program of Requirements? The Dutch cities of Rotterdam, Hilversum, and Helmond are working to develop such a flexible Program of Requirements, taking into account aspects such as scalability, flexibility and shareability of data, as well as privacy, cybersecurity, and data autonomy.  During the session, the city of Aahus shared the experience of Open Data DK, a collaboration of Danish municipalities and regions to not only tender, but collectively develop an open data portal, leading to improved collaboration and cost savings for Danish municipalities and their stakeholders.

2.     Model ByLaw Smart City in Public Space:

The public space is rapidly digitalization with many parties wishing to add sensors, beacons, cameras and other objects to enable various smart city applications. Local authorities need to find effective ways to regulate how this is done, so that the public space does not become a “Wild West” of smart applications. Within the City Deal, a model bylaw has been drawn and it is now being tested in Rotterdam. The question to the group was whether similar bylaws or initiatives been developed in other cities or jurisdictions? The city of Vienna shared its experience developing a Smart City Framework Strategy – a high level but binding document when it comes to designing bylaws related to various smart city domains.

3.     Citizen Measurement Initiatives:

Within the City Deal three Working Groups are exploring how to use citizen measurement to create smart, sustainable, and inclusive cities, and how to link these initiatives to policy. On this topic the group could learn from initiative like iScape and WeCount in Dublin’s Smart Docklands District, which focus on engaging citizens in measurement projects, and linking the results to city policy. And when it comes to engaging citizens in measuring their environment, city of Dublin had another suggestions for the Dutch colleagues: leverage the existing network of public libraries to engage and involve citizens and policy makers in citizen-measurement projects.

Second International Roundtable Planned
The discussion revealed there are a lot of shared challenges, for instance in scaling smart city projects, so it's necessary that we keep sharing approaches and lessons learned internationally.  Following the success of this first international roundtable, we are planning a second session on September 30.  Dutch and international experts who would like to participate, can send an email to Cornelia Dinca via cornelia@amsterdamsmartcity.com with a short explanation of how like to contribute to the session. For more information or any other questions about the City Deal please contact Wendolijn Beukers via wendolijn@future-city.nl.

Thank You to the Participants
ASC and FCF would like to thank all the Dutch and international colleagues who contributed their expertise during the session.

City Deal Working Groups Members
·       Noor van den Brink, Policy Advisor, Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management
·       Marcel Broekhaar, Smart City Program Management, City of Zwolle
·       Arjan Hof, CTO, WeCity
·       Daniel de Klein, Business Development Manager Digital City, City of Helmond
·       Anita Nijboer, Partner, Kennedy Van de Laan
·       Shahid Talib, Directeur Smart City, Heijmans
·       Simone Rodenburg, Advisor CIO Office, City of Enschede
·       Henri de Ruiter, Environmental Advisor, RIVM National Institute for Public Health and the Environment
·       Jeroen Steenbakkers, Owner, Agaleo

International Peers
·       Ulrich Ahle, CEO, FIWARE Foundation
·       Jamie Cudden, Smart City Program Manager, City of Dublin
·       Bo Fristed, CIO, City of Aahus
·       Gianluca Galletto, Managing Director, Global Futures Group
·       Lea Hemetsberger, Director Projects & Network, Open & Agile Smart Cities (OASC)
·       Jong-Sung Hwang, Masterplanner Busan Smart City, South Korea
·       Nigel Jacob, Co-Founder New Urban Mechanics, City of Boston
·       Gabriella Gomez-Mont, Former Director of Laboratorio para la Ciudad, Mexico City & Founder of Experimentalista
·       Jonathan Reichental, Former CIO of Palo Alto & author of Smart Cities for Dummies
·       Florian Wollen, Coordinator, Urban Innovation Vienna

Cornelia Dinca's picture #DigitalCity
Claire Gersen, Advisor Responsible Technology at Province of Noord-Holland, posted

Duurzaam, transparant en onafhankelijk: de nieuwe datastrategie van provincie Noord-Holland

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Provincie Noord-Holland heeft in mei 2021 een nieuwe datastrategie in concept vastgesteld. De wereld verandert snel en de strategie uit 2018 sloot steeds minder aan bij de huidige ambities. Het streven is om datatechnologie in te zetten voor optimale resultaten van onze maatschappelijke opgaven.

Hierbij zijn drie elementen van belang. Als eerste ‘duurzaamheid’. Wij willen profiteren van digitalisering op een manier die zo min mogelijk ten koste gaat van natuurlijke hulpbronnen. Het tweede element is ‘transparantie’. Wij zien in transparantie de kans om te innoveren mét het vertrouwen van onze inwoners. Het laatste element is ‘data-soevereiniteit’. Wij zien het als onze verantwoordelijkheid om onze onafhankelijkheid zo veel mogelijk te borgen. En misschien nog wel belangrijker: óók de onafhankelijkheid van de inwoners van Noord-Holland.

Om deze stip op de horizon te bereiken hebben we vier doelstellingen opgesteld:

Doelstelling 1
In 2023 zijn wij beter dan nu in staat om met data de maatschappelijke resultaten van onze opgaven te beschrijven, verklaren, voorspellen of optimaliseren.

Met datatechnologie dragen we bij aan de maatschappelijke resultaten die wij voor onze opgaven willen bereiken. Die resultaten verschillen per opgave. Daarom zullen wij voor elke opgave de datapositie in kaart brengen, zo kunnen we tegemoetkomen aan de specifieke behoeften. Voor een aantal complexe deelopgaven starten we bijvoorbeeld een experiment, waarbij we  de mogelijkheden van een ‘digital twin’ onderzoeken.

Doelstelling 2
In 2023 zijn de digitaliseringsbelangen van onze provincie adequaat behartigd op het niveau van de Europese Unie, de Rijksoverheid, de Tweede Kamer en de regio Amsterdam.

Digitalisering en AI vertegenwoordigen een steeds groter economisch en maatschappelijk belang. Zij hebben meer en meer politiek-bestuurlijke aandacht. Zowel op het niveau van de Europese Unie, de Rijksoverheid, de Tweede Kamer als de regio Amsterdam. Dat is relevant voor onze lobby.

Doelstelling 3
In 2023 is meer data van de provincie open en toegankelijk beschikbaar en weten de inwoners van Noord-Holland waar ze deze data kunnen vinden.

Open data is voor de provincie om twee redenen van belang. Allereerst draagt het bij aan transparantie, wat essentieel is voor het vertrouwen van onze inwoners. Daarnaast stelt open data externe partijen, bijvoorbeeld startups, in staat om applicaties te ontwikkelen. Hiervoor richten wij in 2021 een open dataregister in. En hebben wij in 2023 onze meest relevante open datasets gepubliceerd.

Doelstelling 4
In 2023 ervaren inwoners, bedrijven en onze partners dat wij inzet van data en datatechnologie afwegen tegen de Tada-waarden: inclusief, zeggenschap, menselijke maat, legitiem en gecontroleerd, open en transparant, van iedereen - voor iedereen.

We werken vóór onze inwoners en bedrijven. Dus zorgen we dat ons werk met data geen negatieve gevolgen voor hen heeft. Kortom: we gaan verantwoord om met data en datatechnologie. Om dit waar te maken experimenteren we in 2021-2023 met het toepassen van de Tada-waarden en werken we toe naar het publiceren van onze algoritmen in een register. Zo innoveert de provincie Noord-Holland mét het vertrouwen van haar inwoners en bedrijven.

Note van ASC: Wil je nog net iets meer weten? Laat het weten in de comments.

Claire Gersen's picture #DigitalCity
Christiaan Elings, Strategy & Collaboration for Sustainable Transitions at Royal Haskoning, posted

Gezonde stad: slim, samen en in samenhang

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Een gezonde stad is vitaal, veerkrachtig en toekomstbestendig – zowel maatschappelijk als economisch. Maar vanzelf gaat het niet. De druk op de stad is groot en de situatie is urgent, want er moet veel en liefst tegelijk: meer woningen, minder lawaai, schonere lucht, minder hittestress, een lager energiegebruik. Dit lukt alleen als we het slim, samen en in samenhang doen.

En er is goed nieuws: al die transities scheppen niet alleen verplichtingen, maar ook geweldige mogelijkheden. Zo biedt data science kansen om tot goede plannen en oplossingen te komen, om deze te visualiseren en communiceren én om participatie en besluitvorming te organiseren. In bijgaand artikel uit Binnenlands Bestuur geeft mijn collega Jan de Wit een overzicht van kansen.

Meer info: Gezonde stad: slim, samen en in samenhang

Christiaan Elings's picture #Citizens&Living
Audrie van Veen, International Strategic Advisor at Amsterdam Economic Board, posted

Regional Green Deals presented at EU 100 Intelligent Cities Challenge and EU Blueprint for Local Green Deals published

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The Regional Green Deals of the Metropolitan Region Amsterdam were presented by Frank Weerwind, Mayor of Almere at the Mayor’s Summit of the 100 Intelligent Cities Challenge. Together with the Amsterdam Economic Board and Amsterdam Smart City, the Metropolitan Regio Amsterdam acts as a mentor region for the 100 European cities who participate in the challenge to work together on their ambitions for the digital and green transition.

For cities that want to work with their stakeholders on ambitious green deals the European Commission now published a practical guide titled Local Green Deals, A Blueprint for Action.

Find the speech by Mayor Weerwind below

22 June 2022

Honorable guests, ladies and gentlemen,

It is a great pleasure and honor to me to be invited to the Mayors’ Summit of the 100 Intelligent Cities Challenge,  and I am very excited to share with you some of my thoughts on the green and digital – or  twin – transition in the cities and regions of Europe. I also would like to express my gratitude to the European Commission and the Committee of the Regions for organizing this event on Green Deals and for launching the 100 Intelligent Cities Challenge. By doing this, you recognize the power of cities in the twin transition, you see the need for support for cities to make this transition happen and by this programme, you facilitate the network that cities can create.

My own city is Almere, a new town near Amsterdam and just 45 years old: it was created from scratch on reclaimed land from the sea, and is now a vibrant city with over 215.000 inhabitants. It is a city without ancient history and traditions, but a young city with a strong pioneering spirit, where there is space to experiment and to test innovative solutions in living labs. Our living lab approach has resulted in various circular and sustainable energy innovations in the city, for example: a smart thermal grid for the new Hortus neighborhood. The living lab approach has also led to the choice for Almere as the location for the World Expo on Horticulture in 2022, the Floriade, which will showcase innovations on greening, feeding, healthying and energizing cities, under the umbrella off Growing Green Cities.  The twin transition is evidently a core aspect in this event. I will take this opportunity to invite you all to visit the expo next year in Almere.

But this morning I represent not only Almere but the Metropolitan Region Amsterdam, a region consisting of 32 municipalities and two provinces. An economically strong region in Europe with a high quality of life, an international hub with a huge amount of talent, knowledge, innovation and businesses. The Metropolitan Region Amsterdam is one of the so-called mentors in this programme, because we believe in sharing our vision with other cities in terms of knowledge and innovation, but, please, let me assure you that our ‘success’ story has been established, due to knowledge and innovation coming from the cooperation between cities. My aim for now is to continue the dialogue with you on the issues that we are sharing together.

As many of your regions, our region, with an economy highly defined by tourism and services industries, was hit hard by COVID-19. Therefore, we decided at an early stage to investigate, together with knowledge institutions and the business sector, how we could aim for green recovery. We felt more was needed, besides the required regional energy strategies, investing in our energy backbones, which nowadays also include a hydrogen-infrastructure, and ongoing European energy transition projects such as Atelier. We asked the Amsterdam Economic Board to organise this investigation, since they act independently and aim for connecting the companies, research and education institutes and governments in our region. Facing such an unprecedented crisis, we did not want to do this as governments alone, but together with all relevant stakeholders. And, my fellow Mayors, that is a lesson I want to share with you: don’t do it alone.

Based on interactive stakeholder sessions and scenario-planning, we started a trajectory towards green recovery, resulting so far in 3 Regional Green Deals and with these deals, extra focus on skills for sustainable jobs. The Green Deals are: making the textile value chain circular, developing the region as a innovative bicycle hotspot and -for the Netherlands this is really innovative- increase the amount of new-build houses in timber to 20% of the total of new residential building activity.

As a result of those Local Green Deals, we invest faster and more effectively in the economy of today and tomorrow. The aim is to anticipate on changing jobs and the necessary skills, to fill existing and future vacancies and to achieve greater well-being and prosperity in the long term. And that is what we wish for the whole of the European Union.

To conclude, I would like to compliment you with your efforts in the 100 Intelligent Cities Challenge. And please feel free to take a closer look into the work of the Metropolitan Region Amsterdam and to learn, copy the elements that would benefit you, but also to bring your knowledge to us, for example via our online platform Amsterdam Smart City. That way, together we advance in the European twin transition. And move forward to the digital, inclusive and sustainable future of our cities.

Audrie van Veen's picture #CircularCity
Emma Habers, posted

Workshop - Fieldlab: Cities of Things 

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The workshop “Cities of Things Amsterdam-Munich” is part of the Creative Embassy AMS-MUC program and kicks off a field lab that focuses on this new paradigm of the smart city: the Cities of Things. It introduces the research theme and invites you to explore possible collaborations in field lab projects.

When: Thursday July 8
What time: 10.00 – 12.00
Where: online

We invite companies to participate that are interested in or already are working on solutions for the (smart) city, and are interested in the impact of new technologies such as AI, IoT, robotics on our city life and society.

The Creative Embassy program was initiated by Creative Holland and the Team of Excellence for the Culture and Creative Industries of the City of Munich and started in 2015 as a collaboration between the cities of Amsterdam and Munich. This multi-year partnership created opportunities for creative industries in both regions to exchange and work together on urban challenges.

For more information and to sign up send an e-mail to Emma Habers at e.habers@amsterdam.nl.

Note from ASC: Are you going? Let others know by dropping a like.

Emma Habers's picture Online event on Jul 8th
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

Beyond the smart city: Digital innovation for the Good of citizens

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About ten years ago, technology companies started to provide cities with technology, luring them with the predicate ‘smart(er)’, a registered trademark of IBM.  At that time Cisco's vice-president of strategy Inder Sidhudescribed the company’s ‘smart city play’ as its biggest opportunity, a 39,5 billion dollar-market. During the years, that followed, the prospects rocketed: The consultancy firm Frost and Sullivan estimated the global smart city technology market to be worth $1.56 trillion by 2020.

The persistent policy of technology companies to suggest a tight link between technology and the wellbeing of the citizens, angers me. Every euro these companies are chasing at, is citizens’ tax money. What has been accomplished until now is disappointing, as I documented in the IET Journal.  According to The Economist it is not surprising that a ‘techlash’ is underway: Many have had it with the monopolistic dominance of behemoths like Google, Amazon, Facebook and the like, because of their treatment of sensitive data, the lack of transparency and accountability of algorithm-based decision making and the huge profits they make from it.

Regaining public control

However, let's not throw out the baby with the bathwater and see how digital innovation can be harnessed for the Good of all citizens. Regaining public control demands four institutional actions at city level.

1. Practicing governance
Before even thinking about digitalization, a city must convert into best practices of governance. Governance goes beyond elections and enforcing the law. An essential characteristic is that all citizens can trust that government represents their will and protects their interests. Therefore, it is necessary to go beyond formal democratic procedures and contact stakeholders directly, enable forms of participatory budgeting and deploy deliberative polling.
Aligning views of political parties and needs and wants of citizens takes time and a lot of effort. The outcome might be a common vision on the solution of a city’s problems and the realisation of its ambitions, and a consecutive political agenda including the use of tools, digital ones included.

2. Strengthening executive governmental power
Lack of cooperation within the departmental urban organizations prevents not only an adequate diagnosis of urban problems but also the establishment of a comprehensive package of policy instruments, including legislation, infrastructure, communication, finance and technology. Instead, decisions are made from within individual silos, resulting in fragmented and ineffective policies. Required is a problem-oriented organization instead of a departmental one and a mayor that oversees the internal coherence of the policy.

3. Level playing field with technology companies
Cities must increase their knowledge in the field of digitization, artificial intelligence in particular. Besides,  but they should only work with companies that comply with ethical codes as formulated in the comprehensivemanual, Ethically Aligned Design: A Vision for Prioritizing Human Well-being with Autonomous and Intelligent Systems, drafted by the influential Institute of Electric and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
Expertise at city level must come from a Chief Technology Officer who aligns technological knowledge with insight in urban problems and will discuss with company representatives on equal foot. Digitalisation must be part of all policy areas, therefore delegating responsibility to one alderman is a bad idea. Moreover, an alderman is not an adequate discussion partner for tech companies.

4. Approving and supporting local initiatives
Decentralization of decision-making and delegating responsibility for the execution of parts of the policy to citizen’s groups or other stakeholders helps to become a thriving city. Groups of citizens, start-ups or other local companies can invoke the right of challenge and might compete with established companies or organizations.

In summary: steps towards seamless integration of digitalization in citizen-orientated policy

1.     Define together with citizens a vision on the development of the city, based on a few central goals such as sustainable prosperity, inclusive growth, humanity or - simply - happiness.
2.     Make an inventory of what citizens and other stakeholders feel as the most urgent issues (problems and ambitions).
3.     Find out how these issues are related and rephrase them if desirable.
4.     Deepen insight in these issues, based on available data and data to be collected by experts or citizens themselves.
5.     Assess ways to address these issues, their pros and cons and how they align with the already formulated vision.
6.     Make sure that digital technology has been explored as part of the collected solutions.
7.     Investigate which legal, organizational, personnel and financial barriers may arise in the application of potential solutions and how to address them.
8.     Investigate undesired effects of digital techniques, in particular long-term dependence ('lock-in') on commercial parties.
9.     Formulate clear actions within the defined directions for dealing with the issues to be addressed. Involve as many expert fellow citizens as possible in this.
10.  Make a timetable, calculate costs, and indicate when realization of the stated goals should be observable.
11.  Involve citizens, non-governmental and other organizations in the implementation of the actions and make agreements about this.
12.  At all stages of the process, seek support from those who are directly involved and the elected democratic bodies.
13.  Act with full openness to all citizens.

I can't agree more than with the words of Léan Doody (smart city expert Arup Group): I don't necessarily think 'smart' is something to strive for in itself. Unlike sustainability or resilience, 'smart' is not a normative concept…. The technology must be a tool to deliver a sustainable city. As a result, you can only talk about technological solutions if you understand which problems must be solved, whether these problems are rooted in the perceptions of stakeholders and how they relate to other policy instruments.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #DigitalCity