#Clean air

Topic within Citizens & Living
Puck Hoogenboom, Communication at Waag, posted

Better Future Now: de Grote Spelbrekershow

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Tijdens de Grote Spelbrekershow gaan we in gesprek met spelbrekers; verschillende mensen die het anders doen en daarnaast actief zijn in verschillende domeinen, zoals wonen, mode, design, data, economie, klimaat, en de kunsten. Een ding hebben ze gemeen: allen staan ze voor systeemverandering.

We hebben het over waar de huidige systemen wrikken: waar wringen de regels, wie zijn de winnaars en de verliezers? En wat is er voor nodig om de regels open te breken? Samen kijken we naar alternatieven.

Ook kan je genieten en je laten inspireren door muziek en spoken word. Zien we je daar?

Met Met o.a. Melissa Koutouzis (co-initiator Woonprotest), Ruben Pater (designer & researcher), Thamar Kempees (marketeer & sneakerhead), Broke Ass Millionaires (creative producers & sustainable circulair fashion), Arne Hendriks (kunstenaar), Elten Kiene (spoken word) en Benjamin Fro (muziek)

Meet-up on Sep 24th
Dana van der Zee, Digital Innovation , posted

The Open Source For Public Services Conference

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Join us for a day of engaging workshops and sessions on solutions, outcomes, and visions that the partner cities and universities have come across during the SCORE project.

This conference aims to bring together the SCORE and OASC community, as well as any other interested parties, in a hybrid event format in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and online worldwide.

The SCORE partners are working together to improve efficiency and quality of public service delivery based on smart, open data driven solutions. Join us for an engaging day focusing on the latest findings within such services and topics - i.e. traffic flow, pollution, drainage, flooding through the use of digital twins, dashboards, registries and more - as we wrap up the SCORE project.

Conference on Jun 8th
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

22. Two '100 smart city missions'- Twice an ill-advised leap forward

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The 22nd and penultimate episode in the *Better cities: The contribution of digital technology-*series will discuss two ambitious ‘smart city’plans of two governments and the associated risks.

Recently, the European Commission launched a 100-city plan, the EU Mission on Climate-Neutral and Smart Cities. One hundred European cities that aspire to be climate neutral by 2030 (you read that correctly) can register and count on supplemental funding. I immediately thought of another 100-city plan, India's Smart City Mission. In 2015, Prime Minister Modi announced that in six years 100 Indian cities would become 'smart'. The official term of the project has now ended, and I will examine below whether this goal has been achieved, I discuss the two plans and then explain why I call both of them a leap forward. At the end I will make a few suggestions for how the European mission can still learn from the Indian one.

India's Smart City Mission

The problem
In India, 377 million people live in cities. In 15 years, 200 million will have been added. Already, traffic in Indian cities has come to a complete standstill, each year more than 600,000 people die from air pollution, half of the urban areas have no drinking water connection, waste collection is poor and only 3% of sewage is treated. The rest is discharged into surface water, which is also the main source of drinking water.

The mission
The Smart City Mission was intended to implement substantial improvements on all these problems in 100 cities, which together comprise 30% of the population. In the improvements digital technology had to play an important role.
The 100 cities were selected because of favorable prospects and the quality of the plans, which usually consisted of a long series of projects.

Governance
The regular city governing bodies were deemed incompetent to lead the projects. That is why management boards (‘special purpose vehicles’) have been appointed, operating under company law and led by a CEO, supported by international consultancy firms. All rights and duties of the City Council regarding the execution of the mission were delegated to the appointed boards, including the power to collect taxes! Not surprisingly, this decision has been challenged in many places. Several cities have withdrawn from 'the mission' for this reason.

Financing
To implement their projects, each city would receive $150 million over five consecutive years. This money should be seen as seed capital to be supplemented from additional sources such as public-private partnerships, commercial bank lending, external financing, loans, and foreign investment.

Area-oriented and pan-urban approach
The plans contain two components: an area-oriented and a pan-urban approach. The first aims at adapting, retrofitting or new construction and should relate to a wide range of 'smart services'. For example high-speed internet, waste facilities, parking facilities, energy-efficient buildings, but also replacement of slums by high-rise buildings. The slick 'architectural impressions' that circulated at the beginning of the planning period (see above) mainly concern the area-oriented approach.
The pan-urban approach includes at least one 'smart' facility for a larger part of the city. The choice is often made to improve the transport infrastructure, for example the construction of new roads and highways and the purchase of electric buses. No fewer than 70 cities have built a 'smart' control center based on the example of Rio de Janeiro, which I believe was rather premature.

Progress
Now that the official term of 'the mission' has ended, a first inventory can be made, although observers complain about a lack of transparency about the results. About half of all the 5000 projects that have been started have not (yet) been completed and a significant part of the government funds have not yet been disbursed. This could still happen in the coming years. This is also because attracting external resources has lagged behind expectations. These funds came mainly from governments, and large technology companies. This has had an impact on the implementation of the plans.
The slow progress of most projects is partly because most of the population was barely aware of the mission and that city councils were not always cooperative either.

Impact
It was foreseen that half of the available resources would go to area-oriented projects; this eventually became 75-80%. As a result, on average only 4% of the inhabitants of the cities involved have benefited from 'the mission' and even then it is not clear what the benefits exactly entail. The city of New Delhi covers an area of almost 1500 km2, while the area concerned is only 2.2 km2: So you're not even going to have 100 smart cities. You're going to have 100 smart enclaves within cities around the country, said Shivani Chaudhry, director of the Housing and Land Rights Network.
It soon became clear that the mission would be no more than a drop in the ocean. Instead of $150 million, it would take $10 billion per city, $1000 billion in total, to address all ambitions, according to an official calculation.  Deloitte was a little more modest, calculating the need for $150 billion in public money and $120 billion from private sources.

Type of projects
The many topics eligible for funding have resulted in a wide variety of projects. Only one city has put the quality of the environment first. Most cities have initiated projects in the areas of clean energy, improving electricity supply, reducing air pollution, construction of new roads, purchasing electric buses, waste disposal and sanitation. What is also lacking, is a focus on human rights, gender, and the interests of the poorest population groups.
In some places, it has been decided to clear slums and relocate residents to high-rise buildings on the outskirts of the city. Indian master architect Doshi warns that the urban vision behind the smart city plans will destroy the informality and diversity that is the cornerstone of the country's rural and urban society. He challenges planners to shift the emphasis to rural areas and to create sufficient choices and opportunities there.

The European Mission on Climate-neutral and Smart Cities

The problem
Cities produce more than 70% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions and use more than 65% of total energy. In addition, cities in Europe only cover 4% of the total surface area and accommodate 75% of the population. The ecological footprint of the urban population is more than twice what it is entitled to, assuming a proportional distribution of the earth's resources.

The mission
On November 25, 2021, the European Commission called on European cities to express their interest in a new European mission on Climate-neutral and smart cities. The mission aims to have 100 climate-neutral and smart cities by 2030, which will act as a model for all other European cities.
The sectors involved in this transformation process are the built environment, energy production and distribution, transport, waste management, industrial processes and product use, agriculture, forestry, and other land uses and large-scale deployment of digital technology. That is why the European Commission talks of a green and digital twin, or a simultaneous green and digital transformation.

Governance
Reaching the stated goal requires a new way of working and the participation of the urban population, hence the motto 100 climate neutral cities by 2030 - by and for the citizens.
According to the plan's authors, the main obstacle to climate transition is not a lack of climate-friendly and smart technology, but the inability to implement it. The current fragmented form of governance cannot bring about an ambitious climate transition. Crucial to the success of the mission is the involvement of citizens in their various roles as political actors, users, producers, consumers, or owners of buildings and means of transport.

Funding
The additional investment to achieve the mission is estimated at €96 billion for 100 European cities by 2030, with a net positive economic benefit to society of €25 billion that will increase further in the period thereafter. The European Commission will provide €360 million in seed funding.
The overwhelming amount of funding will have to come from banks, private equity, institutional investors, and from the public sector at the local, regional and national level.

What went wrong with the Indian Mission and its follow-up

The gap between ambitions and reality
Almost all comments on 'the mission' emphasize that three necessary conditions were not met from the start, namely a widely accepted governance model, adequate funding, and involvement of the population and local government. There was an unbridgeable gap between ambitions and available resources, with the contribution of external capital being grossly overestimated.
The biggest problem, however, is the gap between the mission's ambitions and the nature of the problems that India it faces: Cities are bursting at the seams because of the millions of poor people who flock to cities every year in search of work and a place to live that find them only in the growing slums. The priorities for which the country must find a solution are therefore: improving life in rural areas, improving housing in the cities, ensuring safe drinking water, waste disposal, sanitation, and purification of wastewater, good (bus) transport and less polluting car traffic. Urgently needed is a sustainable development model that addresses ecological problems, makes urbanization manageable, controls pollution and will use resources efficiently.

Leap forward
The 'Mission' is a leap forward, which does not tackle these problems at the root, but instead seeks a solution in 'smartification'. Policymakers were captivated by the promises made by IBM and other technology companies that ICT is the basis for solving most urban problems. A view that I objected in the third episode of this series. IC solutions have been concentrated in enclaves where businesses and prosperous citizens are welcomed. The Government of India Special Rapporteur on Housing therefore notes that the proposals submitted had a predominant focus on technology rather than prioritizing affordable housing and doubts the correctness of this choice.
Instead of emphasizing the role of digital technology, the focus should have been on equitable, inclusive, and sustainable living areas for all. Not the area-oriented but the pan-urban approach should have prevailed.

Follow-up
Several authors suggest future actions consistent with the above comments:
• Setting a longer time horizon, which is much more in line with the problems as they are felt locally.
• Decentralization, coupled with strengthening local government in combination with citizen participation.
• A more limited number of large-scale pan-urban projects. These projects should have an immediate impact on all 4000 Indian cities and the surrounding countryside.
• More attention for nature and the environment instead of cutting down trees to widen motorways.
• Training programs in the field of urbanization, partly to align urban development with Indian culture.

The European mission revisited

Leap forward
Europe and India are incomparable in many ways, but I do see similarities between the two missions.
With the proclamation of the 'mission', the Indian government wanted to show the ultimate – perhaps desperate – act of determination to confront the country's overwhelming problems. I therefore called this mission a flight forward in which the image of the 'smart city' was used as a catalyst. However, the country’s problems are out of proportion to this, and the other means employed.
It is plausible that the European Union Commission also wanted to take an ultimate act. After the publication of the ambitious European Green Deal, each national governments seems to be drawing its own plan. The ‘100 cities mission’ is perhaps intended as a 'booster', but here too the feasibility of this strategy is doubtful.

Smart and green
The European Union cherishes the image of a 'green and digital twin', a simultaneous green and digital transformation. Both the Government of India and the European Commission consider digital technology an integral part of developing climate neutral cities. I hope to have made it clear in the previous 21 episodes of this series that digital technology will certainly contribute. However, the reduction of greenhouse gases and digitization should not be seen as an extension of each other. Making a city climate neutral requires way more than (digital) technology. Moreover, suitable technology is still partly under development. It is often forgotten that technology is one of the causes of global warming. Using the image of green and smart twins will fuel the tension between the two, just like it happened in India. In that case, it remains to be seen where the priority will lie. In India it was 'smart'.

Funding
Funding of the Indian mission fell short; much is still unclear about funding of the European mission. It is highly questionable whether European states, already faced with strong opposition to the costs of 'climate', will be willing to channel extra resources to cities.

Governance
The European mission wants to be by and for the citizens. But the goal has already been established, namely becoming climate neutral by 2030. A new 'bottom-up' governmental approach would have been to investigate whether there are cities where a sufficiently large part of the population agrees with becoming climate neutral earlier than in 2050 and how much sooner that could be and next, leave it to these cities themselves to figure-out how to do this.

Can Europe still prevent its mission from failing like India's? I propose to look for in the same direction as India seems to be doing now:
•      Opt for one unambiguous goal: Reducing greenhouse gases significantly earlier than 2050.
•      Challenge a limited number of cities each to form a broad coalition of local stakeholders that share this ambition.
•      Make extra resources available, but also ask the cities themselves to make part of the necessary investments.
•      Stimulate universities and industry to provide a European response to Big Tech and to make connections with the 'European Green Deal'.

My e-book Smart City Tales contains several descriptions of intended and alleged smart cities, including the much-discussed Saudi Arabian Neom. The Dutch version is here.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #CircularCity
A. Hutanu, Engineer , posted

Replacing short car trips with LEV's may reduce CO2 emissions, study suggests

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Smart mobility and LEV’s: a general introduction

 #Smart-Mobility is an important aspect for daily life and commuting/recurrent transportation needs and in this day&age there are many potential solution(s) for smart-mobility in Amsterdam. Today some of these new vehicles types are mostly restricted on city streets and Amsterdam citizens cannot grasp the potential of this vehicles. These devices can go up to at least 20km of range for short trips and with vehicle speeds ranging from 20, 25, 45 km/h (e-scooter, e-bike, moped respectively) and some as far as 90km/h (micro-car 90), etc.

Potential CO2 emission reduction research

There is a study regarding CO2 potential emission reduction by the use of light electric vehicles (LEV's) in contrast to short car trips usage. LEV's CO2 emissions is averaged at 24g CO2 eq/km compared with conventional vehicles (including EV's) averaged at 203g CO2 eq/km. The findings are quite relevant since it could reduce CO2 emissions as much as 44% = 57 million tones CO2 eq per year. The full study can be found at URL link below.

Proposal

If the Gemeente Amsterdam would lift the ban on LEV’s, this would be beneficial for Amsterdam citizens since they would have less noise (silent devices), cleaner air (by the study analysis) and maybe more fun alternative to ICE-scooters and cars.

A. Hutanu's picture #Mobility
Ioana Biris, co owner at Nature Desks, posted

De tweede, herziene druk van #UrbanNatureAmsterdam, de groenblauwe kaart van de stad is er!

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Bijna drie jaar na de lancering van de eerste versie van de groenblauwe kaart van Amsterdam en 3.000 exemplaren verder, hebben we een tweede - herziene - druk van #UrbanNatureAmsterdam gemaakt. Maandagavond 21 maart werd tijdens Vier de Lente! in Pakhuis de Zwijger het eerste exemplaar uitgereikt aan de nieuwe groenburgemeester van Amsterdam.

Wat is nieuw in deze tweede versie van #UrbanNatureAmsterdam? Ontdek bijvoorbeeld 🌱 de eekhoornbruggen in het Gijsbrecht van Aemstelpark, 🌱 twee nieuwe stadsparken, 🌱 het monumentaal groen of de eerste tiny forest van de stad, 🌱 nieuwe stadse Trage Tochten, 🌱 de natuur in de 'Port of Amsterdam', 🌱 nieuwe partners, 🌱 informatie over natuur inclusief bouwen of 🌱 de vernieuwde top-10 lijsten met dingen die je in de stad kunt doen.

Op de voorzijde van de kaart zie je letterlijk hoeveel groen en blauw in Amsterdam is te vinden: de parken, (binnen)tuinen, plantsoenen, natuurspeeltuinen, sportvelden, grachten, meren, polders en bossen. De achterzijde van de kaart vol met informatie fungeert als een oproep aan de gebruiker: ontdek de natuur, maar draag ook bij aan vergroening van de stad.

Met dank aan Urban Good CIC en aan onze nieuwe partners Buurtgroen020, Anmec en Natuurfontein. En partners Gemeente Amsterdam, Staatsbosbeheer, Waterschap Amstel, Gooi en Vecht en Recreatie Noord Holland.

Ioana Biris's picture #Citizens&Living
Rene visser, External Affairs , posted

Meld je aan voor de 5G Hub Innovation Challenge 'the Sustainability edition'

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Help je mee om de wereld mooier te maken? Doe dan samen met ons mee aan de 5G Hub Innovation Challenge #sustainability editie. Je kan je aanmelden tot 25 april!

Na de selectieronde is er voor iedereen de mogelijkheid om persoonlijk in gesprek te gaan voor advies. Voor de winnaars hebben we dankzij onze fantastische partners met inspirerende juryleden hele mooie prijzen. Deze zullen later bekend worden gemaakt. Uiteraard zorgen wij ervoor dat de meest aansprekende #innovatie een volgende stap kan zetten in de markt.

Wil je meer informatie check de website: https://5ghub.nl/nl/5g-hub-innovation-challenge/ of stuur me een bericht. Uiteraard kan je je ook direct aanmelden via de website.

Rene visser's picture #CircularCity
Floor Beckers, Communication professional at Gemeente Amsterdam, posted

Do you have the ultimate solution for a safe cycle path?

In the Netherlands, people like to cycle a lot. However, bicycle paths are not always safe due to the great variety of cyclists, such as cargo bikes and e-bikes, racing cyclists and bicycle delivery drivers. The Amsterdam Bike City (ABC) Innovation Lab from the Municipality of Amsterdam is looking for the best solution for the variety of speeds on the cycle path, to do something about this problem. The ten best submissions may present their solution to a jury of leading professionals.

Do you have the best idea to improve safety on bicycle paths? If so, you will win € 2,000 and have a chance of winning € 45,000 to implement your idea. Take that chance!

More information:

#Mobility
Erik Feleus, Digital Strategist & Smart Building Developer at Schiphol, posted

Let's go electric!

As in the rest of the Netherlands, the number of electric cars (EVs) at Schiphol will only increase in the coming years. Whereas Royal Schiphol Group currently has 400 EV charge points, we expect to grow rapidly towards 10,000 charge points over the next few years. We cannot achieve this growth alone. That is why we are looking for a partner who can help us manage this growth with smart technology. Can you help us? Check the link below to the tender on Negometrix

Erik Feleus's picture #Mobility
Paul Horsmans, Communicatieadviseur at Gemeente Haarlemmermeer, posted

Healthy Urban Living & Working bij SHARE Meets

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SHARE Meets gaat dit keer over Healthy Urban Living & Working. Van lang, gezond, vitaal, sociaal en zelfstandig samenleven. Rode draad tijdens deze ondernemersbijeenkomst zijn Landgoed Wickevoort en een proef met geluidadaptief bouwen op Schiphol Trade Park. Landgoed Wickevoort is een nieuw duurzaam woongebied in het historische dijkdorp Cruquius. Centraal staat 'Gezond Stedelijk wonen & werken': gezond, vitaal en sociaal samenleven. Hoe maakt ontwikkelaar AM dit waar? Bram Breedveld van Landlab vertelt welke klimaatadaptieve maatregelen zijn meegenomen voor minder hittestress, regenbestendigheid en meer natuur. Verder komen de nieuwe stadsboeren Martin Verzijden en zus Ada de Graaff-Verzijden van Wickevoort aan het woord.

Paul Horsmans's picture Online event on Dec 15th
Trisha van Engelen, Junior Community & Program Officer at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Green Deal ZES MRA Meetup #8

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Twee jaar geleden hebben meer dan 50 publieke en private partijen uit de Metropool Amsterdam de Green Deal Zero Emissie Stadslogistiek MRA ondertekend. Daarmee gaven zij aan zich in te willen spannen op weg naar emissie-vrije stadslogistiek in 2025.

In 2025 zijn vrachtvoertuigen in de stad emissievrij. Logistieke en verkeersdata zijn slim gekoppeld. Slimme en schone (stads)logistiek is een belangrijke voorwaarde voor de economische vitaliteit en de aantrekkelijkheid van de regio. In de transitie naar slimme en schone stadslogistiek is de ondertekening van de GDZES MRA in 2019 op en 2020 – op initiatief van de Amsterdam Economic Board – door meer dan 60 partijen van grote betekenis geweest.

Maar hoe staat het er nu voor? Welke acties zijn er door overheden, bedrijven en kennisinstellingen inmiddels opgezet en wat werkt wel en wat werkt niet?

Na anderhalf jaar zoomen organiseert de Amsterdam Economic Board de Green Deal ZES Meetup#8. Op 12 oktober komen we weer live bij elkaar. Hier zullen een aantal succesvolle en onverwachte samenwerkingen worden besproken en heb jij de kans om jouw voorstel, idee of vraagstuk met een korte pitch te delen met de community. En natuurlijk worden de nieuwe ondertekenaars ook nog voorgesteld!

Het programma is als volgt:

Welkom & Introductie
Richard Hoving

Updates & Calls
Met onder andere pitches van:
- Hurby, duurzame regionale sameday avondbezorging – Mark Fontein
- Vervoerregio, Regionale Uitvoeringsagenda Stadslogistiek – Ton Geuzendam (lees ook dit interview)
- Coding the Curbs, op weg naar slimme flexibele infrastructuur – Martijn Pater
- Hogeschool van Amsterdam, Future Food Logistics Challenge – Kees-Willem Rademakers

Introductie nieuwe GDZESMRA toetreders
Met o.a. Cargoledger, Cenex Group, Open Waste, Schneider Electric, CLIC, Alliander,
Goodman, Leap24, Bidfood, Pantar, Coding the Curbs, Babboe Pro, Cipiobox, Hurby, Feenstra, HAVI en EVConsult.

Feestelijk teken- en fotomoment

GDZES MRA Netwerkborrel

Wil je erbij zijn? Dat kan! Meld je aan via de link.

Trisha van Engelen's picture Meet-up on Oct 12th
NEMO Science Museum, posted

Event: Luchtdata

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Hoe schoon is de lucht in Nederland, in Amsterdam en in de buurt? In deze workshop van het RIVM ga je aan de slag met data over luchtverontreiniging door fijnstof, stikstof en koolstofdioxide. Wat betekenen deze data, hoe zoek je ze op en wat kun je ermee doen?

NEMO Science Museum's picture Masterclass / workshop on Nov 6th
Lucas Parkker, Software Developer , posted

Intelligent Transportation System – Best Option for Smart Cities

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Growing population, aging infrastructure, lack of mobility-related resources, and inefficient transport networks are leading to higher traffic congestion, road safety, and supply of mobility services in urban areas. It has become important for cities to look for smart mobility solutions to tackle these problems. Intelligent Transportation System is one such innovative concept that enables reliable and more personalized travel experience to move around in cities. Let’s have a look at the concept in detail.

What is an Intelligent Transportation System?

Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) strives to innovate, plan, operate, evaluate, and manage transportation systems by leveraging advanced information and communication technologies. ITS refers to the use of technology to collect and analyze information related to the sector to deliver integrated transportation solutions.

It focuses on various modes of transportation, infrastructure, vehicles, traffic management, stakeholders, and smart mobility. From a holistic point of view, it rectifies errors related to transportation, infrastructure and enables systematic management of the entire transport system by leveraging a wide range of technology. It is one of the important components of many innovative transportation solutions like Mobility as a Service, Connected, and automated mobility.

Moreover, effective use of infrastructure, capacity, technology in ITS requires a lot of planning well in advance by ITS specialists. That can be implemented by collaboration or public-private partnerships. Because there are so many things that need to be taken into consideration while implementing ITS, e.g., transport modes, design, routing, vehicles, technology type, and traffic flows, to make transportation safe and well-coordinated.

What is the need For ITS?

Transport authorities continue to raise the bar for safe and hassle-free transportation for commuters, but there are other challenges that commuters face related to urban congestion, inadequate road infrastructure, aging infrastructure, road safety, inefficient public transportation, and higher energy consumption. ITS can play an important role in solving these problems and better manage and control the transportation systems in real-time.

ITS facilitates new opportunities and more transportation choices integrated with easy-to-use technology. It is a multi-disciplinary concept that presents much-needed and cost-effective transportation solutions for smart cities. ITS can:

  • Use resources and infrastructure effectively (existing as well as new)
  • Plan, design, and implement comprehensive transportation systems
  • Offers multi-modal, adequate, and on-demand transportation options
  • Enhance public transportation management and its attractiveness
  • Combat urban congestion
  • Improve road safety and security
  • Reduce fuel and energy consumption levels
  • Control and manage traffic in the cities
  • Make transport safe, efficient, manageable, and sustainable
Lucas Parkker's picture #Citizens&Living
Roel van der Heijden, Technology, physics and astronomy editor of NEMO Kennislink. at NEMO Kennislink, posted

Vervoer in 2050: zo duurzaam mogelijk

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Gaan we straks met de hyperloop op vakantie, stappen we in een personendrone, of is de (elektrische) fiets hét vervoersmiddel van de toekomst? In vier artikelen zoekt NEMO Kennislink-redacteur Roel van der Heijden op welke transportmanieren we moeten inzetten. Sparen we het milieu of willen we zo snel mogelijk overal ter wereld zijn? Sommige keuzes gaan ten koste van elkaar, maar niet altijd. We definiëren steeds een nieuwe einddoel. Het eerste deel is: hoe maken we vervoer zo duurzaam mogelijk?

De (elektrische) fiets is in dit toekomstscenario doorgebroken als hét vervoersmiddel voor alle afstanden onder de pakweg twintig kilometer. Hij blijkt niet te verslaan als het om duurzaamheid gaat. Ga je iets verder dan pak je de elektrische auto of trein. Voor de echt lange reizen gebruiken mensen het vliegtuig op grotendeels synthetische brandstoffen uit duurzame stroom.

Klinkt dit scenario verrassend ‘gewoon’? De fiets, de auto en het vliegtuig als de vervoersmiddelen van de toekomst? Waar zijn de drones en hyperloops? Uit een rondgang van NEMO Kennislink bij een aantal duurzaamheids- en vervoersonderzoekers blijkt dat we het daar wat betreft duurzaamheid niet van moeten hebben.

Lees het artikel hier. In vervolgdelen nemen we op een vergelijkbare manier de snelheid, betaalbaarheid en het delen van vervoer onder de loep.

(foto Petar Milošević via CC BY-SA 4.0)

Roel van der Heijden's picture #Mobility
Anonymous posted

TechLab

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Located in the Plantage area of Amsterdam, a new exhibition space featuring cool new innovations in technology has recently opened.

The gallery space contains many exhibits dedicated to augmented reality, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, 3D printing and robotics. Each station is interactive and playful, ensuring visitors will have fun while learning about these various technologies.

Based around the theme of sustainability, the space shows how we can use technology as a resource to improve not only our lives but our world. Be sure to check out this unique educational tech gallery!

#DigitalCity
Jochem Kootstra, Lecturer at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

Hoe gaan we om met steeds hetere zomers?

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5 publicaties over hittebestendig inrichten van steden, met behulp van burgers

Van hitterecords in de laatste zomers tot uitgedroogde parken. De effecten van de opwarming van het klimaat worden steeds beter zichtbaar. Vanaf 2020 zijn Nederlandse gemeenten aan zet om straten en wijken te toetsen en in te richten op hittebestendigheid (Deltaprogramma, 2018). En ook de burger wil er graag de vinger op leggen. Wat kunnen zij samen bereiken? Lees voor inspiratie 5 publicaties van de Hogeschool van Amsterdam (HvA) over hittebestendig inrichten van steden en woningen.

Een koele kijk op de inrichting van de buitenruimte

De hete zomers maken het leven in de stad steeds vaker onaangenaam en hebben gevolgen voor vele aspecten van ons leven. De HvA schreef samen met partners een adviesrapport om het dagelijks leven buitenshuis tijdens hete dagen te verbeteren. Van hittekaarten en interactieve mindmaps om de hitteopgave van de stad zichtbaar te maken, tot concrete ontwerprichtlijnen die gemeenten en professionals in wijken en straten kunnen inzetten. Lees over een koele kijk op de inrichting van de buitenruimte.

Hitteproef in woningen

Wat is de koelbehoefte van woningen en welke factoren zijn van invloed op oververhitting binnenshuis? Tijdens de hittegolf van 2020 zijn metingen verricht naar de ontwikkeling van de binnentemperatuur in 11 woningen verspreid over 5 locaties (Groningen en Amsterdam). Bewoners is gevraagd gedurende de metingen een handelingsdagboek bij te houden om inzicht te krijgen in het effect van bijvoorbeeld het sluiten van zonwering of openen van een raam; overdag en ‘s avonds. Hoe ervaart de bewoner hitte in huis? Lees over de resultaten van koelbehoeften in woningen.

Praktijkonderzoek hitterichtlijnen

De HvA ontwikkelde in de zomer van 2020 drie ontwerprichtlijnen voor een hittebestendige inrichting van de buitenruimte, met concrete grenswaarden. Zoals: 300 meter tot een koele plek, of 40 % schaduw op loopgebieden. In dit onderzoek zijn de richtlijnen in de praktijk onderzocht door metingen, interviews, foto’s en GIS-analyse te combineren. Voor elke van de richtlijnen worden de methode, resultaten en aanbevelingen beschreven, zodat de aanpak eenvoudig opschaalbaar is naar andere gemeenten. Lees wat dit voor jouw gemeente kan betekenen.

‘Meet je stad!’

Om te zien wat de temperaturen zijn in eigen stad, wijk en achtertuin, plaatsten deelnemers van het burgerwetenschapsproject ‘Meet je stad!’ zelf ontworpen meetkastjes met daarin temperatuursensoren. In Amersfoort leidde een samenwerking tussen burgers en professionals tot een completer beeld van het hitteprobleem in de stad en de aanpassingen die nodig zijn. Informatie uit de haarvaten van de stad wordt hiermee toegevoegd aan bestaande kennis. Lees over de temperatuurgegevens in de zomer van 2018, van in totaal 148 meetkastjes verspreid door Amersfoort.

Meetmethodes voor een Cool Town

In het Europese project Cool Towns werken regio’s, gemeenten, bedrijven en universiteiten samen aan het in kaart brengen van ruimtelijke, economische en leefbaarheidsconsequenties van hittestress. Net als het monitoren van klimaatadaptatiemaatregelen en de implementatiekansen in beleid. Op basis van meetervaringen van 2 jaar veldonderzoek in 4 Europese landen is recent het gestandaardiseerde Cool Towns Heat Stress Measurement Protocol ontwikkeld. Middels 3 methodes kunnen beleidsmakers, ontwerpers en adviseurs zelf het ervaren thermische comfort van hun buitenruimtes in kaart brengen voor een gedegen kosten-batenafweging van hittestressmaatregelen. Dit zijn de 3 meetmethodes.

Transitiethema Designing Future Cities

De publicaties vallen onder lectoraat Water in en om de stad van transitiethema Designing Future Cities. Designing Future Cities werkt aan ontwerpoplossingen voor onze steden opdat deze toekomstbestendig zijn. De focus ligt op klimaatbestendigheid, circulaire bouw en leefbaarheid van de stad. Een integrale aanpak staat centraal, om verbinding te maken tussen deze en andere opgaven. Het is één van de vier onderzoeksthema’s van Centre of Expertise Urban Technology.

Jochem Kootstra's picture #Citizens&Living
Sara de Boer, Programmamaker at Pakhuis de Zwijger, posted

Livecast Pakhuis de Zwijger - Een veranderend landschap

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Hoe kunnen duurzame energiesystemen passen in het Hollandse landschap? Welke afwegingen maken we op welke locaties? Hoe ziet ons landschap van de toekomst eruit? Vind de antwoorden op deze en meer vragen in de livecast van Pakhuis de Zwijger

Wanneer: maandag 28 juni
Hoe laat: 20:30 uur
Kosten: gratis

Ons landschap wordt al eeuwen bepaald door ons energiegebruik. Groene weides van nu waren eeuwen geleden ontginningsgebieden van veen en de idyllisch draaiende molens zorgde voor hout en voedsel. Ons landschap transformeert. De openbare ruimte wordt steeds vaker voor meerdere functies tegelijk gebruikt. Het opwekken van groene energie wordt ook steeds vaker een onderdeel van de gebouwde en natuurlijke omgeving.

Sprekers:

Jannemarie de Jonge is landschapsarchitect en partner bij Wing, een adviesbureau dat met overheden, bedrijven en maatschappelijke organisaties werkt aan duurzaam gebruik en ontwikkeling van de ruimte. Daarnaast is zij sinds 2020 Rijksadviseur van de fysieke leefomgeving.

Huib van Essen is gedeputeerde van de Provincie Utrecht met in zijn portefeuille ruimtelijke ontwikkeling, omgevingswet & energietransitie en klimaat. Huib is vanaf 2010 lid van GroenLinks.

Willem Hellevoort is ambassadeur natuurmonumenten in Noord-Holland, Flevoland en de Markerwadden. Natuurmonumenten beschermt plant en dier en geeft ze een stem in het beschermen van hun leefgebieden.

Jeroen Everaert is initiatiefnemer van het kunst initiatief Mothership. Mothership is een begrip in de kunst(wereld) dat gaat voor inspiratie en verwondering met lef. Ze denken mee over ruimtelijke projecten om functionaliteit en design met elkaar te verenigen.

Online event on Jun 28th
Eline Meijer, Communication Specialist , posted

Metropolitan Mobility Podcast | Why are Milan's children playing on the street again? 

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Demetrio Scopelliti (Director of Urban Planning and Public Space, city of Milan) speaks with Geert Kloppenburg and Chris Bruntlett (Dutch Cycling Embassy) about the Piazze Aperte and Strate Aperte Plan that changed the streets and squares of Milan.

In the podcast they talk about:
• How introducing a ping pong table brings people together;
• How you (urban) plan for the unexpected;
• How the city of Milan built 60 kilometers of cycling track in a year.

And see a short video of the project

Interested in more best practices in EU cities? Register here for the Celebrating Cycling Cities event 1st of June, with Stientje van Veldhoven and Frans Timmermans!

Eline Meijer's picture #Citizens&Living
Eline Meijer, Communication Specialist , posted

Metropolitan Mobility Podcast | Barcelona Superblocks!

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How did Poblenou in Barcelona turn into a green oasis? Superblocks!

“I think it is impossible to be against Superblocks.” Silvia Casorran (Deputy Chief Architect at the Barcelona City Council) and Patrick Kappert (member of neighbourhood organisation Collective Superblock Poblenou) speak with Geert Kloppenburg about the Superblocks of Barcelona. They discuss:

- How the Superblocks started
- Why everyone is talking about Superblocks
- How living in a Superblock changed their lives

Listen here

Interested in more best practices in EU cities? Register here for the Celebrating Cycling Cities event 1st of June, with a.o. Stientje van Veldhoven en Frans Timmermans!

Eline Meijer's picture #Citizens&Living