#Policy

Topic within Digital City
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Data Dilemma’s: Digital twins – hype or necessity?

Featured image

With the growing availability of data and technology, digital versions of objects or systems are getting more interesting. Pairing the virtual and physical world, it is possible to continue critical physical processes while digitally experimenting and looking for improvements. The ‘digital twin’ therefore is an interesting feature, also in urban development.

Governments are exploring what a digital twin can mean for them or have already taken the first steps. Some with a clear output or use case in mind, some to experiment and build upon for the future. Setting up a digital twin of a city or region is complex and could therefore become costly. A digital twin may even grow into a
system where no one is able to comprehend how an implication has come about anymore.

In a discussion with a number of digital twin projects, we will address opportunities and barriers. Are current projects more than 3D models? What are the key enablers and challenges in starting digital twins for urban applications? Which steps are the
most difficult to implement? Do we fully trust on the system and will reality be handled by a computer? How are decisions for further development made?

Join us for these and of course the questions from the audience during this session of Data Dilemmas on the 17th of December!

Program:
Online event
Date: 17th of December 2020
Language: English

15.50: Digital walk-in
16.00 – 16.05: Introduction by Amsterdam Smart City & Datalab
16.05 – 16.45: Presentations + Q&A
Speakers will be confirmed soon!
16.45 – 17.15: Plenary discussion and wrap-up

Sign up: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/data-dilemmas-digital-twins-hype-or-necessity-tickets-131311784081

About the Data Dilemmas series
Digital Twins show us that possibilities of using data and new technologies to address urban challenges are endless. We use data to make cities safer, cleaner and, for example, more accessible. But do we really need the data in all cases? What happens to all the data that is collected? Which choices did people make and why? Which dilemmas can be encountered? These questions are important for everyone; for governments, knowledge institutions, residents and companies. Amsterdam Smart City likes to explore with you which decisions are needed for responsible use of data.
Data Dilemmas is a collaboration between Amsterdam Smart City and the City of Amsterdam’s Datalab.

Amsterdam Smart City's picture Online event on Dec 17th
Jeroen Sipman, Environmental Policy Advisor at Province of Noord-Holland, posted

Interessant Volkskrant-artikel over de groeiende beweging van citizen-sensing

Featured image

De provincie Noord-Holland is twee jaar geleden in samenwerking met het RIVM, de Waag Society, Tata Steel en lokale overheden het project Hollandse Luchten gestart om de luchtkwaliteit op zwaarder belaste locaties rondom het Noordzeekanaalgebied fijnmazig in kaart te brengen. Hierbij worden inwoners begeleid en opgeleid om de sensoren in elkaar te zetten en de uitkomsten van de metingen te begrijpen. Vervolgens kan er een discussie worden gehouden over het gezamenlijk ontstane beeld van de omgevingskwaliteit.

De Volkskrant schreef een artikel over hoe het meten van de omgevingskwaliteit door inwoners met de jaren is ontwikkeld en wat voor een invloed dit heeft op de discussie rondom leefbaarheid van gebieden.

Jeroen Sipman's picture #Citizens&Living
AMS Institute, Re-inventing the city (urban innovation) at AMS Institute, posted

Responsible Sensing Lab

Featured image

The City of Amsterdam has many smart technologies in place: from smart devices that measure things (i.e. sensors) to smart devices that steer processes in the city (i.e. actuators) such as traffic lights, charging stations, adaptable street lights, barriers that go up and down, and adaptive digital signs.

To illustrate, throughout the city there are over 200 cameras, about 230 air quality sensors and almost 500 beacons in place. The latter being devices in physical spaces that emit a signal that can be picked up by mobile devices with a specific app.

Smart technologies like these help the municipality to efficiently measure, analyse and steer processes in the urban area. For example to optimize mobility flows in urban environments, to better use available capacity of energy infrastructures, to conduct condition management on the city’s assets, rationalise garbage removal and much more.

Responsible Urban Digitization
On the one hand, innovations like these can help improve the quality of life in the city and enhance safety and efficiency, but also sustainability and livability. Simultaneously, such novel technologies can impact society quite broadly. They could have consequences for matters that citizens value greatly, such as autonomy, privacy, transparency, inclusiveness and empowerment.

“The City does not want its inhabitants negatively impacted by potential privacy infringements, sense of loss of control and understandability, or reactions such as self-censorship.” - Sigrid Winkel | Urban Innovation Officer | City of Amsterdam CTO

“Our recent research has pointed out that ‘official’ actors primarily see transparency as a mean to ensure adoption, while citizens see transparency as a starting point for voicing their concerns and influencing the purpose and use of smart technology. This leads us to conclude that we - as designers of these systems - need to aim to design these systems for engagement as well as pushback by society.” - Gerd Kortuem | Professor & AMS PI

Launching a Responsible Sensing Lab
With our Responsible Urban Digitization program, we research, develop and integrate smart technologies like the aforementioned to help solve urban challenges. At the same time, we explore how to embed society’s public and democratic values in the design of these innovations.

As part of this program, we are launching a Responsible Sensing Lab. In essence this is a testbed for conducting rigorous, transparent, and replicable research how our smart technologies placed in public space can be designed in a way that makes the digital city ‘responsible’.

(Re)designing, prototype testing and implementing responsible sensing systems
In the Responsible Sensing Lab academics are invited to connect and work with practitioners who are responsible for digital systems in the city to (re)design, prototype and test (more) responsible ways of sensing in public space for and with the City of Amsterdam.

Hence, the Lab is a place where teams of multi-disciplinary stakeholders – such as computer scientists, policy makers, psychologists, designers and hardware experts – can address existing hardware, software and other city sensing systems.

“Responsible Sensing Lab is a place where experimentation and technologies come together to (re)design these innovations solutions that make public spaces cleaner, smarter and easier – while at the same time guaranteeing our social values.” - Thijs Turèl | Program Manager Responsible Urban Digitization | AMS Institute

Three cases: Human Scan Car, Transparant Charging Station, Camera Shutter
There are already a few examples of projects that will be further explored in the Responsible Sensing Lab. Namely, the Human Scan Car, Transparent Charging Station and Camera Shutter projects.

Firstly, scan cars – vehicles that are equipped with sensors to collect data on the urban environment – are becoming increasingly popular to help the municipality to carry out tasks efficiently. For example with parking policy enforcement, waste registration and advertisement taxation. Apart from making the city more efficient and clean, with this project we question and explore what public and democratic values should be embedded in the implementation of these scan cars.

Together with UNSense, we invited representatives from the City of Amsterdam and Rotterdam, TADA, and researchers from TU Delft to join us for a 3-day sprint to design “the scan car of the future”, that also looks at the human and fair values of the advances in technology. Get a full impression of this design sprint here.

“Design should play a role in guiding the perceptions of, and interactions with, automated sensing systems in the city. Going through this process with AMS Institute's researchers and public servants, we’ll be able to bend the design towards a more consciously chosen, collectively desirable future.” - Tessa Steenkamp | Sensorial Experience Designer | UNSense

Secondly, the transparent charging station is a design project meant to explain smart charging algorithm decisions to users. In the near future, when electric cars become more prevelant, the electicity grid will no longer be able to charge all electric cars at the same time. Smart charging algorithms will help coordinate which car will get to charge at what time. But how do these algorithms decide? The transparent charging station project produces the first user interface informing people about smart charging decisions.

"The transparent charging station promises to improve the democratic oversight of algorithms in EV charging. By explaining charging algorithm inputs, procedures and outputs in a user interface, EV drivers should be able to determine the system's fairness and see who the responsible parties are". - Kars Alfrink | Doctoral Researcher | TU Delft

Thirdly, the Camera Shutter project originated based on the notion that people do not know if and when cameras in public space are recording or not*.* We wondered: would people like to live in a city where all city cameras clearly show or state when they’re not in use? What if, just like laptop shutters many people have placed over their webcam, this could be a way to make clear to citizens when a camera is not recording them?

For this third project, a timelapse camera at the office of AMS Institute was outfitted with a shutter. Subsequently, the effects of this small-scale pilot will be examined by interviewing staff and visitors.

Core values for responsible urban digitization
At the Responsible Sensing Lab, and for Responsible Urban Digitization program as a whole, we use the City’s values (TADA, Digital City Agenda) as our starting point. We will explore what these values mean when applied to actual digital software and hardware.

Also, we are inspired by the methodology of value sensitive design. This approach allows us to focus on design choices inherent in the type of sensing hardware, the distribution of intelligence between cloud and back-end, the physical design and placement of sensors in public space, and interaction possibilities for citizens.

Recently, a three year collaboration has been signed between the City of Amsterdam and AMS Institute. In this Lab, we’ll work closely with experts at TU Delft Industrial Design Faculty.

AMS Institute's picture #DigitalCity
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

The Journey Continues — The Road to Smart City Live Reveals Lessons Learned and Opportunities for Follow-up

Featured image

The Road to Smart City Live was a three day program that featured more than 40 sessions covering a wide variety of smart city and urban innovation topics including smart governance, data platforms, digital twins, smart mobility and living labs. The goal was to bring together and connect the Dutch and Nordic smart city ecosystems, facilitate knowledge exchange, and help establish new collaboration opportunities.

The program was held in the lead up to this year’s digital alternative to the World Smart City Expo, Smart City Live. Amsterdam Smart City contributed to the program by organizing daily recap sessions together with Amsterdam Trade & Innovate and Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO).  The intention was to create a casual setting for participants to reflect on lessons learned and discuss opportunities for follow-up.

Here are six key outcomes from the recap sessions:

  1. Outdated Regulations — Cities and innovators are struggling with outdated regulations.  The role of governments should be to ensure the right regulations are in place for stimulating the transition to sustainable and liveable cities.  This is much more important and effective than facilitating specific pilots, which can be left to the market when the right regulations and incentives are in place.  However, changing regulations is easier said than done.  The City of Amsterdam is collecting input on what regulatory changes need to be overcome to facilitate the energy transition.
  2. Public-Private Collaboration — Despite a strong appetite for public-private collaboration, organizing it in practice remains a challenge.  City of Amsterdam has developed innovative procurement programs like Startup in ResidenceInnovatie Partners and AI4Cities to enable collaboration with start-ups and scale-ups. And, the City of Amsterdam is now sharing these tools and lessons learned nationally and internationally, for example through the Startup in Residence Toolkit.
  3. Post Corona Recovery — How can the corona emergency be used to implement and accelerate ambitions for circularity and sustainability?  FME hosted a session exploring best practices which can help cities recover from corona and build back better.  FME will facilitate follow-up discussion and exchange among parties interested in collaborating on post-corona recovery.
  4. Digital Transition — Digital technology is increasingly part of all aspects of urban life and software innovation is key to a safe, responsible and inclusive digital transition. ITEA is currently preparing several innovative projects on topics like smart mobility and future of work which are still open for input from potential partners.
  5. Digital Inclusion & Data Control — Covid-19 has deepened the digital divide and highlighted the need for building digitally inclusive cities.  In order to become a digitally inclusive city, the City of Eindhoven is working to ensure all citizens have access to digital tools and are aware of what’s happening with their data.
  6. Scaling Living Labs — Netherlands and Sweden are leaders in smart city pilots and living labs, but in both countries scaling remains a challenge. While some stakeholders express “pilot fatigue”, others argue that this great diversity of pilots (including many failures) is an indicator of a healthy innovation ecosystem.  Cleantech Scandinavia and RVO are looking for ways to better capture and share lessons learned from past pilot projects, and ways to "resuscitate" and scale them when appropriate.

The Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO) collaborated with ITEA, Cleantech Scandinavia and the cities of Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht, Eindhoven and The Hague to facilitate The Road to Smart City Live.  Video recordings from the different sessions will be made available in the upcoming weeks via the b2match platform.

For more information about any of the above lessons learned or follow-up opportunities, please connect with cornelia@amsterdamsmartcity.com.

Did you participate in (The Road to) Smart City Live?  Are there more insights or opportunities for follow-up which you would like to share with the community? Share your feedback in the comments below.

Cornelia Dinca's picture #Citizens&Living
Francien Huizing, Program and Communication Manager at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Wicked Problems

Featured image

Te wicked? Niet voor ons.

Wij werken allemaal aan urgente, complexe, maatschappelijke uitdagingen. Issues die schier onoplosbaar lijken, van dilemma’s en paradoxen omgeven, nog niet duidelijk hoe het moet. Wel is duidelijk dát het moet, dat we elkaar nodig
hebben en dat we er NU aan moeten beginnen. Om met de woorden van Jan Rotmans te spreken; we leven niet in een tijdperk van verandering maar in een verandering van tijdperk. En hier hoort een nieuwe gereedschapskist bij.

En of je nou aan energietransitie werkt, andere mobiliteitssystemen, creëren van waterstofhubs, peer to peer autodeelsystemen, het maakt niet uit, we zien dat al deze opgaven op enig moment tegen gelijksoortige barrières aanlopen. Op samenwerking, financiering, privacy, onvoldoende aansluiting op de maatschappij, om maar een paar voorbeelden te noemen.

Unieke samenwerking
Als Amsterdam Smart City netwerk willen en kunnen we deze opgaven niet laten liggen. Door het bundelen van onze kennis en expertise kunnen we als netwerk iets unieks bieden en de wil en durf tonen om deze barrières te doorbreken. De betrokken partners die dit uitdenken en begeleiden zijn RHDHV, Kennisland, Drift, NEMO, Arcadis, Alliander, HvA en Metabolic. Zij bundelen hun expertise en ervaring om de echte vragen boven tafel te krijgen, tot nieuwe manieren van samenwerken te komen en barrières te doorbreken. We richten ons met name op de start van de samenwerking. Gezamenlijk ontwikkelen we een ‘wicked problem aanpak’. Op een nieuwe manier, lerend door te doen, exploratief.

Waar moet je aan denken?
Wat is eigenlijk het echte probleem? Wiens probleem is dit? Hoe kijken anderen er tegenaan? Welke andere partijen lijken nodig? Hoe vind je ze? Hoe ga je om met eigenaarschap en botsende frames? Hoe zorg je dat je al in
een vroeg stadium de maatschappij (bewoners, ondernemers, werknemers, etc) betrekt en hun ervaringen in het project trekt? Het wicked problem team zet nieuwe methoden in voor het beantwoorden van deze vragen. En het creëren van de benodigde commitment om het vraagstuk aan te pakken. Niets staat van te voren vast, want we passen ons aan aan wat we tegenkomen. Met elkaar ontwikkelen we een nieuwe aanpak om de barrières te doorbreken.

Francien Huizing's picture #Energy
Amsterdam Economic Board, posted

State of the Region 2020

Deze editie zoomen we in op de economische gevolgen van de coronacrisis, de lessen die we hieruit leren, en de acties die partijen in en om Amsterdam nemen om uiteindelijk beter en duurzamer uit de crisis te komen. We kunnen het virus misschien nog niet de baas, wel kunnen we actie nemen om mensen snel opnieuw perspectief op werk te geven en in organisaties bedrijfsprocessen duurzaam in te richten.

State of the Region

Burgemeester van Amsterdam Femke Halsema spreekt haar jaarlijkse ‘State of the Region’ uit en prominenten uit bedrijfsleven, wetenschap en overheid gaan vervolgens met elkaar in gesprek over de toekomst van de regio en wat vandaag nodig en haalbaar is.

Amsterdam Economic Board's picture Online event on Dec 2nd
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

De mindset voor een menselijke slimme stad

Featured image

Met dit evenement brengen Amsterdam Smart City, BTG en de Gemeente Almere de Smart City Expo Barcelona naar je keukentafel!

Dat technologie kan helpen om de stad duurzamer en beter te maken, is niet nieuw. Het is de gedachte achter het concept ‘Smart City’ en de Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona die deze maand plaats zou vinden. Maar niemand wil in een Smart City wonen die zich alleen richt op technologie. Natuurlijk wel in een veilige, groene en bruisende stad.

Hoe creëren we die duurzame en leefbare steden? Hoe kan technologie hierin een nuttig middel zijn? Hoe zetten we mensen centraal in deze steden en nemen we hun waarden mee in de ontwikkeling?

Klaas van Egmond, hoogleraar Geowetenschappen, neemt ons mee in een inspirerend verhaal over de tijdsgeest en de mindset die nodig is om uitdagingen in steden aan te gaan. Vervolgens gaan we in gesprek. Hoe pas je deze mindset toe in je werk? Zie je partijen bij wie dit al goed lukt of juist niet? Daarna is er een roadshow met start-ups die betere straten, buurten en steden realiseren, met behulp van technologie. En als deelnemer kun je hen ook weer een stap verder helpen.

Als kers op de taart hebben we iets heel speciaals op de planning staan.. Hét online platform waar jij dagelijks online inspiratie en kennis haalt is volledig vernieuwd. Dit zullen we gezamenlijk en feestelijk met je lanceren!

Kortom, een evenement vol nieuwe inzichten, netwerk en inspiratie.

Programma 17 november 2020:

09.30 uur – Introductie

09.45 uur – Keynote door Klaas van Egmond + Q&A

10.20 uur – Breakouts – keukentafelgesprekken – nieuwe inzichten toegepast

10.45 uur - Break

10.55 uur – Roadshow door Metropoolregio – initiatieven die met behulp van tech betere straten, buurten, steden maken

11.10 uur – Lancering nieuw Amsterdamsmartcity.com

11.25 uur - Afsluiting

Doe mee! https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85274832895

Amsterdam Smart City's picture Online event on Nov 17th
Jochem Kootstra, Redacteur at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

Research accelerates the sustainability of heating

AUAS contributes to accelerated roll-out of sustainable low-temperature heating networks in HeatNet project

The international research project HeatNet is all about making heat more sustainable. Less use of natural gas and more use of sustainable heat sources such as the residual heat from data centres. The project aimed to accelerate the roll-out of heating networks in urban areas. And that has been a success! Not only have new heating networks been developed in six European cities, the participating partners have gained knowledge about operating smartly in complex urban transitions. The professors and researcher involved from the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences (AUAS) talk about the approach and the insights gained.

The role of the AUAS in the research project involves leading evaluations. During six evaluation meetings over three years, the partners reflected on their process of learning from each other and helping each other move forward. Professor of Energy and Innovation, Renée Heller: “As an evaluator, we not only wanted to determine how it went afterwards. But in accordance with the aim of this Interreg project – transnational learning – we embarked on a continuous learning process with each other.”

ON THE SHOULDERS OF GIANTS
This helps the pilot partners gain insights and build on each other’s discoveries. Frank Suurenbroek, professor of Spatial Urban Transformation: “In such complex transition projects, there is so much to consider. This process-based evaluation approach helps you gain insight into the issues you are facing. Such transitions are not a linear process and the insights cannot always be translated directly to other projects. But this approach does make complex processes navigable. It offers pathways for innovation that you can consider.”

The researchers translated this knowledge into various publications and guides, which have been made available to parties dealing with the roll-out of a heating network. Suurenbroek: “The Stakeholder Guide is also interesting for all parties that work on complex urban transitions.” Lecturer-researcher Egbert-Jan van Dijck was responsible for the development of the Stakeholder Guide.

“The heat transition requires an innovation at system level. Therefore, we carried out an extensive stakeholder analysis at meso-level,” explains Van Dijck. “It not only provides an impression of the individuals and organisations involved at the energy sector level, but also of their role in the chain, their interests and concerns. This step towards a situational analysis has enabled us to outline a holistic picture and carry out an in-depth analysis of barriers to the development of the new generation of heating and cooling networks in terms of finance, legislation and regulations and organisation.”

INVOLVING STUDENTS
“We are further expanding this analysis for education.” Van Dijck: Besides the human elements, we also analyse non-human elements, such as buildings, technologies, infrastructure, energy sources and subsurface. These are just as important in determining the situation as the human elements. For example, the pipes for a heating network cannot be laid through a river or a railway track. You need to be aware of these barriers.” Instead of just the people or the stakeholders, students see a much more complete situation at a glance. This goes for fourth-year students as well as second-year students.

Heller: “Several students have used this project for their graduation thesis. Students have even travelled to Ireland on their own initiative to learn more about the energy and heating situation there and to interview partners.”

ROLL-OUT OF HEATING NETWORKS
“There is a lot involved in creating a heating network,” says Heller. “Considering the complexity, it is unusual and significant that all six partners have succeeded in doing so in such a short space of time. It would be a shame not to use the valuable sources of heat available in a country. Data centres, for example, have a huge amount of heat left over. The roll-out of one heating network to multiple heating networks helps us to use available heat sources to increase sustainability and reduce our CO2 emissions.”

INTERDISCIPLINARY AND CROSS-THEMATIC
The HeatNet project is a good example of interdisciplinary collaboration between two research groups with different specialist knowledge. Frank Suurenbroek: “While the implementation of a heating network may appear to be a technical project, it is also an urban transformation process.” Heller adds: “Urban transition involves projects in which taking the energy leap seems the obvious choice, but where there is still little attention for the heat transition, while a great opportunity exists in that respect. Through our collaboration, we have seized that opportunity.”

Jochem Kootstra's picture #Energy
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Smart City Handbook Thailand

The UK Embassy in Bangkok has produced an awesome detailed handbook about smart city initiatives, policies and methods in Thailand.

It’s really well written and the authors worked closely with depa and Smart City Thailand Office to produce this really wonderful account. Please download and take a look!

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #DigitalCity
Negar Noori, Smart Cities Tech & Policy Researcher at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), posted

Transition from Smart to Inclusive city

Featured image

The primary objective of this research project is to enhance an understanding of the concept of inclusion and its criteria in Smart city discourse. The research ambition is applying the result as a tool for benchmarking inclusive smart cities, which can assess and improve them. To apply the result, we aim to work with cities like Amsterdam, The Hauge, and Rotterdam.

Negar Noori's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

EC 2020 Strategic Foresight Report: Charting the course towards a more resilient Europe

This first annual Strategic Foresight Report outlines how foresight will inform
policies with a view to strengthening the EU’s resilience in four interrelated
dimensions: social and economic, geopolitical, green, and digital. It analyses the EU’s
resilience in response to the COVID-19 crisis in the context of the acceleration or deceleration
of relevant megatrends, long-term driving forces that will likely have a large influence on
the future. This Communication shows how policies to improve resilience, by mitigating
vulnerabilities and strengthening capacities, can open new opportunities in each of the four
dimensions. This includes reconsidering the future of wellbeing, work, labour markets and
skills, reconfiguring global value chains, supporting democracy, reforming our rules-based
trading system, building alliances in emerging technologies, and investing in the green and
digital transitions.
This new focus on resilience calls for close monitoring. This Communication proposes
to move towards resilience dashboards, which, once fully developed in cooperation with the
Member States and other key stakeholders, should be used for assessing the vulnerabilities
and capacities of the EU and its Member States in each of the four dimensions. Such analysis
can help answer the question: are we, through our policies and recovery strategy, effectively
making the EU more resilient?
The strategic foresight agenda will encompass horizontal foresight activities and
thematic forward-looking exercises. For the upcoming year, these include: open strategic
autonomy, the future of jobs and skills for and in the green transition, and deepening the
twinning of the digital and green transitions. This agenda will bring a dynamic perspective
of synergies and trade-offs among EU policy goals, thereby supporting the coherence of EU
policies.

https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/files/strategic_foresight_report_2020_1.pdf

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #Energy
Folkert Leffring, Digital Media Manager , posted

Amsterdam and Helsinki launch AI registers to detail city systems

The cities of Helsinki and Amsterdam have worked together to each launch a first-of-its-kind Artificial Intelligence Register.

“Together with the city of Helsinki, we are on a mission to create as much understanding about algorithms as possible and be transparent about the way we – as cities – use them,” commented Touria Meliani, Deputy Mayor of Amsterdam (Digital City).

Folkert Leffring's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Amsterdam and Helsinki first cities in the world to launch open AI register

The City of Amsterdam, Helsingin kaupunki – Helsingfors stad – City of Helsinki, in collaboration with Saidot, launched the first Public AI Register. The Algorithm Register is an overview of the artificial intelligence systems and algorithms used by the Cities of Amsterdam and Helsinki. Through the register, you can get acquainted with the quick overviews of the city's algorithmic systems or examine their more detailed information based on your own interests.

If you're interested in learning more, here's something for you. The new white paper that was co-written by Linda van de Fliert, Pasi Rautio and Meeri Haataja. They really hope this will part some conversation and most importantly, help other government organisations address #transparency and take their first steps in implementing #AI #governance.

You can also give feedback and thus participate in building human-centered algorithms in Amsterdam. The register is still under development.

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #DigitalCity
Audrie van Veen, International Strategist at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Helsinki publishes guide to agile urban pilots

How to get the most out of urban experimentation? The guidebook for urban developers sums up learnings and experiences from agile piloting in Helsinki.
The Pocket Book for Agile Piloting shares the experiences from Smart Kalasatama and Jätkäsaari Mobility Lab in Helsinki and condenses the key learnings in a pragmatic and easily digestible way. Free download via Forum Virium

Audrie van Veen's picture #DigitalCity
Frans-Anton Vermast, Strategy Advisor & International Smart City Ambassador at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Amsterdam 9th Urban COVID-19 monitor

Every two weeks the City of Amsterdam publishes a monitor on urban measures to deal with COVID-19. Different issues are discussed, depending on the questions we receive from within the municipal organisation. It is aimed at giving a general overview of urban measures worldwide and of other information relevant for cities. It also has an overview of EU measures and of different relevant sources. Please find the 9th version of the monitor attached.
For more information about the measures in Amsterdam, please refer to this website. Earlier versions of the monitor are available through this weblink.
For any suggestions, please mail to internationaloffice@amsterdam.nl. Please refer to the same e-mail address if you would like to subscribe to this mailing.

Frans-Anton Vermast's picture #DigitalCity
Mira Kopp, Assistant , posted

EC-Link Platform

Featured image

You would like to connect with Urban Environmental Sustainability practitioners and researchers in China and exchange your approaches to green transport, clean energy, compact urban development, water and solid waste management, green buildings and municipal finance? Then sign up to the EC-Link platform! The platform links Eco Cities across Europe and China, offering inspiring examples from both sides of Eurasia and enabling direct contacts to the innovators. With the help of an integrated translation tool, posts can be translated into Chinese and English with just one click. Use of the platform is free of charge: http://eclink.org/bbs/#/?lang=en

A description of how the platform works can be downloaded here: http://eclink.org/ec_platform/upload/document/EC-Link_Users'%20Guide-EN.pdf

EC Link

#CircularCity
Roy Cremers, Development , posted

Futureproof. Support a future for Amsterdam makers

Futureproof is a follow-up to the ‘Snelloket for Corona Projects’ that the Amsterdam Funds for the Arts (AFK) launched in April this year in collaboration with the municipality of Amsterdam (Art and Culture, Digital City, Event Fund). €300,000 was made available and this budget was spent in no time.

That is why AFK once again made budget available to re-open its digital ‘Snelloket’ counter. However, this is not enough and that is why AFK now appeals to the valiancy and compassion of all culture lovers and everyone with a heart for Amsterdam.

The Amsterdam Fund for the Arts is a unique city fund. It has been committed to contributing to a diverse and vibrant cultural climate in the city of Amsterdam since 1972. The AFK has never called on the public to contribute. Up until now.

Due to the emergency in which many visual and performing artists currently find themselves, we are compelled to act. We are determined to offer Amsterdam and its makers more perspective.

INVEST IN OUR FUTURE. TOGETHER WE MAKE AMSTERDAM AND ITS MAKERS FUTURE-PROOF

https://www.voordekunst.nl/futureproof

Roy Cremers's picture #Citizens&Living
Cristina Albesa, International Consultant at Integra Innovation, posted

DoQRead Summer Pills

Featured image

HAS YOUR COMPANY ALREADY TAKEN THE STEP FROM TRANSCRIPTION TO COGNITIVE READING?

Text transformation and entity identification features support part of business processes.
Willing to find a solution to identify, extract, understand, classify and integrate texts by analysing images in documents such as orders, despatch notes or mortgages, among others, INTEGRA has developed DoQRead. With DoQRead you will take advantage of Artificial Intelligence progress to reach and cover all needs of every department in your company and organisation.

If you feel like hearing more, you are in luck! We will be glad to show you in a 30 minutes demo how DoQRead can be essential from now on to your company and organisation.
Just write to this email (calbesa@integratecnologia.es) and we will contact you.

Cristina Albesa's picture Online event on Aug 22nd
Annemiek Bots, Woordvoerder at Omgevingsdienst Noordzeekanaalgebied, posted

De OD NZKG heeft de gevolgen van het klimaatbeleid voor energietransitie industrie laten onderzoeken

Wat zijn de gevolgen van het Nederlandse klimaatbeleid voor de energietransitie van de industriële bedrijven? In hoeverre raakt de transitie de bestaande bedrijfsprocessen en wat is de rol van de Omgevingsdienst Noordzeekanaalgebied (OD NZKG) in het ondersteunen van energie innovatie in de regio? De OD NZKG heeft de invloed van deze technologische veranderingen op hun werkzaamheden door CE Delft in kaart laten brengen.

Lees het hele onderzoek hier:
https://odnzkg.nl/gevolgen-klimaatbeleid-voor-energietransitie-industrie-onderzocht/

Annemiek Bots's picture #Energy
Mathieu Dasnois, Communications Manager at Metabolic, posted

We will re-imagine the economy and escape the 9-5 grind.

"We need fundamental economic reform"

Our founder and CEO Eva Gladek joined Pakhuis de Zwijger together with Raise Green's co-founder Matthew Moroney to discuss what a post-COVID-19-future could look like.

Follow the link to watch the video!

Mathieu Dasnois's picture #Citizens&Living