#City Logistics

Topic within Mobility
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

The global distribution of the 15-minute city idea 5/7

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A previous post made it clear that a 15-minute city ideally consists of a 5-minute walking zone, a 15-minute walking zone, also a 5-minute cycling zone and a the 15-minute cycling zone. These three types of neighbourhoods and districts should be developed in conjunction, with employment accessibility also playing an important role.
 
In the plans for 15-minute cities in many places around the world, these types of zones intertwine, and often it is not even clear which type of zone is meant.  In Paris too, I miss clear choices in this regard.
 
The city of Melbourne aims to give a local lifestyle a dominant place among all residents. Therefore, everyone should live within at most 10 minutes' walking distance to and from all daily amenities.  For this reason, it is referred to as a 20-minute city, whereas in most examples of a 15-minute city, such as Paris, it is only about <strong>the round trip</strong>. The policy in Melbourne has received strong support from the health sector, which highlights the negative effects of traffic and air pollution.
 
In Vancouver, there is talk of a 5-minute city. The idea is for neighbourhoods to become more distinct parts of the city. Each neighbourhood should have several locally owned shops as well as public facilities such as parks, schools, community centres, childcare and libraries. High on the agenda is the push for greater diversity of residents and housing types. Especially in inner-city neighbourhoods, this is accompanied by high densities and high-rise buildings. Confronting this idea with reality yields a pattern of about 120 such geographical units (see map above).
 
Many other cities picked up the idea of the 15-minute city.  Among them: Barcelona, London, Milan, Ottawa, Detroit and Portland. The organisation of world cities C40 (now consisting of 96 cities) elevated the idea to the main policy goal in the post-Covid period.
 
All these cities advocate a reversal of mainstream urbanisation policies. In recent decades, many billions have been invested in building roads with the aim of improving accessibility. This means increasing the distance you can travel in a given time. As a result, facilities were scaled up and concentrated in increasingly distant places. This in turn led to increased congestion that negated improvements in accessibility. The response was further expansion of the road network.  This phenomenon is known as the 'mobility trap' or the Marchetti constant.
 
Instead of increasing accessibility, the 15-minute city aims to expand the number of urban functions you can access within a certain amount of time. This includes employment opportunities. The possibility of working from home has reduced the relevance of the distance between home and workplace. In contrast, the importance of a pleasant living environment has increased. A modified version of the 15-minute city, the 'walkable city' then throws high hopes. That, among other things, is the subject of my next post.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Citizens&Living
Steven Conderaerts, data driven company in dynamic parking bay mgmt at geosparc, posted

Visit us at Intertraffic Amsterdam at booth 10.336

Discover our solutions for disabled parking management (as installed in Breda), management for electrical charging on public loading infrastructure and shop&go parking spots.

Meet-up from Apr 16th to Apr 17th
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

Opening exhibition: Urban Sky Lab – Designing for drones in the city

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Last month designers FABRICations, Studio To Create and Inbo the question: “How can drones create a more livable Amsterdam?” The teams developed near-future design scenarios were emergency response and delivery of goods (and people) would impact project areas the Western Port Area, Amsterdam Zuidoost, and RAI Amsterdam. Project partners Arcam and the Amsterdam Drone Lab invite you to the “Urban Sky Lab” expo which kicks off with an actual drone flying from Marineterrein to the ARCAM building to open the expo. Curious about the design proposals? or how this new low altitude airspace above our city will work? Join us!

Title: Opening Exhibition Amsterdam Urban Sky Lab
Date: Thursday, March 28, 2024
Time: walk-in from 5 p.m. – end around 7 p.m.
Location: Arcam
Address: Prins Hendrikkade 600
Sign up for the opening: https://forms.gle/GTNfDBNdUfqA2fhJ6

Tom van Arman's picture Lecture / presentation on Mar 26th
Jose M. Rodrigo, CMO at Mobypark, posted

Exploring Smart Parking Solutions in Amsterdam: The Role of Mobypark in Shaping Urban Efficiency

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The quest for parking in Amsterdam presents a unique set of challenges, including narrow lanes, constant vehicular flow, and strict parking policies. This iconic city, celebrated for its canal system, historical buildings, and cultural vibrancy, also faces the modern urban dilemma of parking scarcity. Amidst these challenges, Amsterdam's approach to parking, characterized by a zonal system with variable rates, mirrors its commitment to promoting sustainable urban mobility. Within the bustling heart of the city, parking fees can soar to €7.50 per hour, a pricing strategy designed to incentivize public transport and biking, cherished and eco-friendly travel methods among the locals.

Amsterdam's dynamic parking strategy also paves the way for innovative solutions like Mobypark, a platform revolutionizing parking by facilitating the rental of private parking spots. This initiative not only offers a cost-effective alternative to the traditional parking hunt but also optimizes the use of existing spaces, aligning with the city's sustainability goals.

For those seeking affordability without sacrificing convenience, Amsterdam's Park and Ride (P+R) facilities serve as a beacon. Strategically located at the city's periphery, these parking havens offer reduced rates, encouraging drivers to park their vehicles and hop on public transport to reach the city's core. This system significantly mitigates urban congestion and lowers parking costs for both tourists and daily commuters.
The allure of P+R locations is undeniable, especially when juxtaposed with the exorbitant costs of street parking. To access P+R discounts, users must integrate their parking with public transportation, highlighting the city's efforts to weave sustainability into the fabric of urban travel. Mobypark's P+R options stand out for their simplicity and affordability, offering seamless access to the city center without the usual prerequisites. Examples include:

Amsterdam's strategy to curtail on-street parking availability is a deliberate move towards fostering a more sustainable, pleasant cityscape. By endorsing alternatives like public transport, cycling, and Mobypark's innovative parking solutions, Amsterdam is making strides in reducing traffic jams, cutting down on pollution, and improving urban life quality. These initiatives are testament to Amsterdam's dedication to a sustainable future, highlighting Mobypark's pivotal role in transforming the city into a smarter, more navigable urban space.

Find a link to Mobypark here: Amsterdam parking

Jose M. Rodrigo's picture #Mobility
Mark Stoevelaar, Project manager at City of Amsterdam: Digitalization & Innovation, posted

Are you an innovative entrepreneur? The In Residence Open Events program might be your chance to cooperate with Amsterdam!

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Want to test your innovation during an open event such as Amsterdam Pride or the Amsterdam marathon? And looking for the opportunity to cooperate with the city in the long run?

The In Residence Open Events programme might be something for you. We have 8 broad defined challenges, ranging from circular economy to safety, from mobility to extreme whether. Basically we're looking for all innovations that can have an positive impact on the city and the event of the future!

During the programme you get:

  • The opportunity to pilot your solution at an open event in Amsterdam, such as Amsterdam Pride or the Amsterdam Marathon
  • 15K test budget to execute this pilot
  • Guidance by an experienced mentor
  • Access to the large municipality network
  • The opportunity for long term cooperation in case of a succesfull pilot
  • Large exposure and feedback opportunities

Interested to see our programme, the challenges and opportunity this brings for you?
See our website, www.innovatiepartners.nl, or see most recent LinkedIn post: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/gemeente-amsterdam-innovatie_inresidence-amsterdam-innovatie-activity-7163881081757253632-6soh?utm_source=share&utm_medium=member_desktop

For questions or thoughts, you can reach out to Mark Stoevelaar, project manager of the In Residence programme.
- mark.stoevelaar@amsterdam.nl
- +31621193028

#Mobility
Paul HOLMES, Entrepreneur , posted

Revolutionise Recycling, Redefine Wealth: Seize the Opportunity with ByeBye Bed Limited and Reborn Products!

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Greetings Trailblazing Visionaries,
Get ready for a seismic shift in sustainability! We're ByeBye Bed Limited, a force of innovation since 2019, experiencing a staggering 900% growth, and now we're inviting you to be part of our electrifying journey - Reborn Products.
The Powerhouse Behind ByeBye Bed Limited: Meet Paul Beckett, the maverick entrepreneur who saw a goldmine in recycling. His vision isn’t just about mattresses; it’s about transforming waste into a treasure trove of sustainable, retail-worthy products. The world is ready for this revolution, and we're leading the charge.
Dazzling Growth, Unstoppable Momentum: From a modest 6,000 sq. ft. to our current 60,000 sq. ft. facility, we've supersized our operation to revolutionise recycling on a grand scale. Brace yourself for a dedicated manufacturing facility that will catapult our capabilities into the stratosphere.
Reborn Products: Where Sustainability Meets Luxury: Our 'Reborn' products aren't just eco-friendly; they're a testament to style, comfort, and sustainability. From avant-garde mattresses to chic futon chairs and everything in between, we’re turning waste into opulence. Currently, 96% of our materials are recycled, making us the pinnacle of green innovation.
Crushing the Landfill Crisis: We're not just talking the talk; we're walking it, stomping on the UK landfill crisis that swallows almost 5,000,000 mattresses each year. We're not just recycling; we're redefining waste, turning it into a jaw-dropping spectacle of sustainability.
Financial Dynamo: Fueling the Future: Hold on tight because the next phase is a financial thunderstorm. We're not just enhancing the use of our recycled materials; we're rewriting the rules of industry, starting with furniture making. Imagine a world where our waste stream becomes the lifeblood of innovation.
Revolutionary Padding Material: Unleashing the Future: Introducing our game-changing padding material, birthed from our waste streams. It's not just 100% recyclable; it's a disruptor, challenging the status quo and reshaping the very fabric of eco-friendly living.
Invest in Tomorrow: ByeBye Bed Limited is the Future: This isn’t just a crowdfunding opportunity; it’s your ticket to invest in the future of sustainability. Join the movement, fuel the revolution, and be part of a success story that will be told for generations.
Social Impact: Building Lives, Breaking Chains: But wait, there's more! Our initiative with HMP isn’t just about recycling materials; it's about recycling lives. We're rehabilitating prisoners, re-skilling them for a triumphant return to society. And the best part? They potentially become integral members of our powerhouse workforce.
Your Invitation to Greatness: Investing in ByeBye Bed Limited and Reborn Products isn’t just about returns; it’s about being part of a seismic shift. This is your opportunity to be on the ground floor of something monumental.
Interested in More Details? Ignite the Revolution - Join Us Now: Email us for more details and become part of a future where recycling isn’t just responsible; it’s a lifestyle. Let's redefine waste, together.
Thank you for daring to dream big with ByeBye Bed Limited and Reborn Products.

Paul HOLMES's picture #Energy
Tom van Arman, Director & Founder at Tapp, posted

Urban Sky Lab - How do drones fit into the city of tomorrow?

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The air space above our city is about change. Drones will soon have a profound impact on our collective future - Last year alone, the city of Amsterdam detected over 43,000 low-altitude flights over our parks, squares, and waterfronts. As this trend continues to grow year-after-year, how can we repurpose drones to create a more sustainable and livable city?

This Thursday & Friday (15-16 Feb.) we are hosting the Urban Sky Lab together with Arcam and the Amsterdam Drone Lab. For this unique event we have invited Studio To Create, INBO, and FABRICations into a two-day sprint to design a future with drones for the Western Docklands, Amsterdam Zuidoost (Amsterdamse Poort area) and RAI Amsterdam.

You are welcome to attend the presentations of the preliminary results at Hotel Casa Amsterdam on Friday afternoon 16 February.

Tom van Arman's picture Masterclass / workshop on Feb 16th
Naomi Vrielink, Projectmedewerker at Future City Foundation, posted

Slimme Stad Parade 23 mei 2024

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Er zijn zoveel smartcity-onderzoeken dat je soms de bomen door het bos niet meer ziet. En daarom brengen we op 23 mei 2024 in Utrecht alle bomen bij elkaar. Wil je weten welke innovatieve smartcity-onderzoeken er zijn die bijdragen aan een leefbare en slimme en sociale stad? Dan mag je de Slimme Stad Parade op 23 mei in het provinciehuis van Utrecht niet missen!

Tijdens dit unieke evenement krijg je de kans om kennis te maken met alle smartcity-onderzoeken in Nederland en Vlaanderen. Ontdek welke slimme wetenschappelijke onderzoeken er zijn voor het sociaal domein en hoe we de verstedelijkingsopgaven van de toekomst kunnen oppakken. En leer wat digitalisering en technologisering betekent voor de maatschappelijke opgaven van vandaag.
Dus, wil je weten welke smartcity-onderzoeken er zijn die bijdragen aan een betere wereld? Wil je het hele bos kunnen overzien? Kom dan naar de Slimme Stad Parade op 23 mei in het provinciehuis van Utrecht en laat je inspireren!

Datum: 23 mei 2024, 10.00 – 17.00 uur (inloop 10.00- 11.00 uur).
Locatie: Provinciehuis Utrecht
Kosten: Deelname aan de Slimme Stad parade is gratis

Meld je hieronder aan:

Meet-up on May 23rd
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

5. Driving without a driver has a price

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In an autonomous car from SAE level 4, perception equipment – the eyes and ears – and software take over human brain functions. This requires accurate maps, laser, radar, lidar and cameras. The lidar, which means 'detect light and range', works in conjunction with the car's cameras. This system pulses laser waves to map the distance to objects day and night, up to up to 100 meters with an accuracy of a few centimeters. The price of all this equipment is between €150,000 and €200,000. The lidar is a high-cost item, although this system is becoming increasingly cheaper due to industrial production. Together, these tools build a four-dimensional image of the environment, and all functions of the moving car are controlled using stored software and communications in the cloud.  

Google/Waymo

Google's X-lab began developing an autonomous car in 2009. In 2016, the company had already completed more than 1.5 million test kilometers and spent $1.1 billion on the development of an autonomous car. The company previously used a self-developed model ('the firefly', see photo). The company then deployed converted Chrysler Pacifica Hybrids, and these will be exchanged for fully electric Jaguar I-Pace cars.
In 2016, Google's parent company Alphabet parlayed autonomous car developments into a new company called Waymo (derived from "a new way of mobility").  

General motorcycles/cruise

Cruise was founded in 2013 with the intention of developing a self-driving car. In 2016, General Moters acquired the company for an amount of $500 million. To date, the company has completed 700,000 test miles in San Francisco's urban environment with no fatalities.

Uber

In 2016, Uber began working with Volvo to develop an autonomous car that could serve as a taxi. The company had acquired software manufacturer Otto for a net $600 million. The company predicted that there will be 75,000 self-driving cars on the road by 2019. That became zero. During the test phase, the company experienced several accidents, including one with a fatal outcome. In addition, Waymo became a target of data theft, a case that was decided in Waymo's favor by the court. Uber therefore had to pay damages of €250 million (in shares). This led to the departure of Uber founder Travis Kalanick. His successor, Dara Khosrowshahi, has put the development of an autonomous car on the back burner. It was recently announced that Uber has signed a contract with Waymo to use this company's autonomous cars in the future.  

Tesla

Until recently, the use of lidar was not possible due to the high costs for car manufacturers that opt for accreditation at SAE level 3. Tesla therefore equipped its cars exclusively with radar, cameras and computer vision. The latter means that all driving Teslas transmit camera images of traffic and the way in which motorists react to 'the cloud'. The company has been developing these images with artificial intelligence for years. It prides itself on the fact that its cars have rules of conduct for every conceivable traffic situation.
The development of the Tesla was accompanied by high expectations but also by many accidents, some of which were fatal. Last year, Tesla made available a beta version of the FSD ("Full Self Driving") software package for a price of $15,000. However, the company had to recall as many as 362,000 cars under the authority of the Traffic Safety Administration because this package was encouraging illegal driving. It looks like that these issues have been resolved and some experts have suggested that Tesla will be able to qualify for accreditation at least at SEA Level 3. This still has to happen.  

Ford and Volkswagen

These companies threw in the towel in 2022 and unplugged Argo, a company that was supposed to develop an autonomous car to provide SAE level 4 taxi services. Instead, both companies announced focusing on the SAE levels 2 and 3, like most auto makers.
 
According to analysts at AlixPartners, the industry has invested $100 billion in developing car automation by 2023, in addition to $250 billion in development of electric cars. I will discus the profitability of these investments later.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Mobility
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

Why we should stop talking about self-driving cars (3/8)

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The term 'self-driving car' is used for a wide variety of technical support systems for car drivers. The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has distinguished six types, as mentioned in the tabel above. This classification is recognized worldwide.

At SAE level 0, a car has been equipped with various warning systems, such as unvoluntary deviation from lane, traffic in the blind spot, and emergency braking.

At SEA levels 1 and 2, cars can steer independently or/and adjust their speed in specific conditions on motorways. Whether drivers are allowed to take their hands from the steering wheel depends on national law. That is certainly not the case in Europe. As soon as environmental conditions make steering and acceleration more complex, for example after turning onto a busy street, the driver must immediately take over the steering.

A properly functioning SAE Level 3 system allows drivers to take their eyes off the road and focus on other activities. They must sit behind the wheel and be on standby and are always held responsible for driving the car. They must immediately take over control of the car as soon as 'the system' gives a ('disengagement') signal, which means that it can no longer handle the situation. There is currently no car worldwide that is accredited at SEA-3 level.

This level of control is not sufficient for driverless taxi services. Automotive and technology companies such as General Moters and Alphabet have been working hard to meet the requirements of the higher levels (SAE 4). Their expensive cars (up to $250,000) have automated backups, meaning they can handle any situation under specified conditions, such as well-designed roads, during the day and at a certain speed. Under these circumstances, no driver is required to be present.

SAE Level 5 automation can operate without a driver in all conditions. There is currently no vehicle that meets this requirement.

The variety of options in this classification explains why the term 'self-driving car' should not be used. Cars classified at SAE level 1 and 2 can best be called 'automated cars' and cars from SAE level 3 onwards can be called autonomous cars.

The state of California introduced new rules in 2019 that allow cars at SAE 4 level to participate in traffic. Very strict conditions apply to this. As a result, Alphabet (Waymo) and General Motors (Cruise) have been allowed to launch driverless taxi services. All rides are monitored with cameras to prevent reckless behavior or vandalism.
 
<strong>Last week, you might have read the last in a series of 25 posts about improving environmental quality.  Right now, I have finalized an e-book containing all posts plus additional recommendations.  If you follow the link below, you can download the book (90 pages) for free. A version in Dutch language can be downloaded HERE**</strong>

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Mobility
Noor Veenhoven, Program manager energy & circularity at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

A new challenge: Floating neighbourhoods with AMS Institute and municipality of Amsterdam

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A lot of what we did in Barcelona was about making connections, sharing knowledge, and being inspired. However, we wouldn’t be Amsterdam Smart City if we didn’t give it a bit of our own special flavour. That’s why we decided to take this inspiring opportunity to start a new challenge about floating neighbourhoods together with Anja Reimann (municipality of Amsterdam) and Joke Dufourmont (AMS Institute). The session was hosted at the Microsoft Pavilion.

We are facing many problems right now in the Netherlands. With climate change, flooding and drought are both becoming big problems. We have a big housing shortage and net congestion is becoming a more prominent problem every day. This drove the municipality of Amsterdam and AMS institute to think outside the box when it came to building a new neighbourhood and looking towards all the space we have on the water. Floating neighbourhoods might be the neighbourhoods of the future. In this session, we dived into the challenges and opportunities that this type of neighbourhood can bring.

The session was split up into two parts. The first part was with municipalities and governmental organisations to discuss what a floating neighbourhood would look like. The second part was with entrepreneurs who specialized in mobility to discuss what mobility on and around a floating neighbourhood should look like.

Part one - What should a floating neighbourhood look like?

In this part of the session, we discussed what a floating district should look like:

  • What will we do there?
  • What will we need there?
  • How will we get there?

We discussed by having all the contestants place their answers to these questions on post-its and putting them under the questions. We voted on the post-its to decide what points we found most important. 
A few of the answers were:

  • One of the key reasons for a person to live in a floating neighbourhood would be to live closer to nature. Making sure that the neighbourhood is in balance with nature is therefore very important.
  • We will need space for nature (insects included), modular buildings, and space for living (not just sleeping and working). There need to be recreational spaces, sports fields, theatres and more.
  • To get there we would need good infrastructure. If we make a bridge to this neighbourhood should cars be allowed? Or would we prefer foot and bicycle traffic, and, of course, boats? In this group, a carless neighbourhood had the preference, with public boat transfer to travel larger distances.

Part two - How might we organise the mobility system of a floating district?

In the second part of this session, we had a market consultation with mobility experts. We discussed how to organise the mobility system of a floating neighbourhood:

  • What are the necessary solutions for achieving this? What are opportunities that are not possible on land and what are the boundaries of what’s possible?
  • Which competencies are necessary to achieve this and who has them (which companies)?
  • How would we collaborate to achieve this? Is an innovation partnership suitable as a method to work together instead of a public tender? Would you be willing to work with other companies? What business model would work best to collaborate?

We again discussed these questions using the post-it method. After a few minutes of intense writing and putting up post-its we were ready to discuss. There a lot of points so here are only a few of the high lights: 
Solutions:

  • Local energy: wind, solar, and water energy. There are a lot of opportunities for local energy production on the water because it is often windy, you can generate energy from the water itself, and solar energy is available as well. Battery storage systems are crucial for this.
  • Autonomous boats such as the roboat. These can be used for city logistics (parcels) for instance.
  • Wireless charging for autonomous ferry’s.

Competencies:

  • It should be a pleasant and social place to live in.
  • Data needs to be optimized for good city logistics. Shared mobility is a must.
  • GPS signal doesn’t work well on water. A solution must be found for this.
  • There needs to be a system in place for safety. How would a fire department function on water for instance?

Collaboration:

  • Grid operators should be involved. What would the electricity net look like for a floating neighbourhood?
  • How do you work together with the mainland? Would you need the mainland or can a floating neighbourhood be self-sufficient?
  • We should continue working on this problem on a demo day from Amsterdam Smart City!

A lot more interesting points were raised, and if you are interested in this topic, please reach out to us and get involved. We will continue the conversation around floating neighbourhoods in 2024.

Noor Veenhoven's picture #Mobility
Jeroen Veger, Additive Manufacturing at 3DMZ, posted

Modular Construction

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During this Meetup we will discuss how modular construction with wood and steel transforms traditional construction practices and opens new doors for efficiency, sustainability and creativity. The project team of the project “Modular and c
Circular Bridge Systems” will show the results of this project and would like to discuss the challenges that modular construction brings with it in the areas of creativity versus standardization, digitalization, circular materials and new business models.

Modular and industrial construction is an umbrella term for innovative construction methods that promote efficiency and sustainability. In modular construction, structures are built from prefabricated modules or components that are produced in a factory and then assembled on the construction site. This speeds up construction time and minimizes waste. Industrial construction focuses on advanced manufacturing technologies and standardized processes to improve quality and efficiency, while also offering flexibility in design. Both approaches contribute to cost savings, reduced environmental impact and faster project delivery in the construction sector.

The project team that will give the presentation consists of:
Thijs Asselbergs - Thijs Asselbergs Architectuurcentrale
Arjan Karssen - Bureau Arjan Karssen
Anke Rolvink - Packhunt
Jasper Dol - 3D Makers Zone (3DMZ)
Mark Feijen - Isaac
Chris Aerts - AplusV
Annette Beerepoot - BouwLab R&Do

16:00 - 18:00 | BouwLab - Oudeweg 91-96, Haarlem

Jeroen Veger's picture Meet-up on Nov 10th
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

20. Facilities within walking and cycling distance

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This is the 20th episode of a series 25 building blocks to create better streets, neighbourhoods, and cities. Its topic is to enable citizens having daily necessities in a walking and bicycling distance.

During the pandemic, lockdowns prevented people from leaving their homes or moving over a longer distance. Many citizens rediscovered their own neighbourhood. They visited the parks every day, the turnover of the local shops increased, and commuters suddenly had much more time. Despite all the concerns, the pandemic contributed to a revival of a village-like sociability.

Revival of the ‘whole neighbourhood’

Revival indeed, because until the 1960s, most residents of cities in Europe, the US, Canada, and Australia did not know better than their dally needs were available within a few minutes' walk. In the street where I was born, there were four butchers, four bakers, three greengrocers and four groceries, even though the street was not much longer than 500 meters. No single shop survived. My primary school was also on that street, and you had to be around the corner for the doctor. This type of quality of life went lost, in the USA in particular. However, urban planners never have forgotten this idea. In many cities, the pandemic has turned these memories into attainable goals, albeit still far removed from reality. Nevertheless, the idea of the 'whole neighborhood' gained traction in many cities. It fits into a more comprehensive planning concept, the 15-minute city.

Support for facilities

The idea is that residents can find all daily needs within an imaginary circle with an area of approximately 50 hectares. This implies a proportionate number of residents. A lower limit of 150 residents per hectare is often mentioned, considering a floor area of 40% for offices and small industry. The idea is further that most streets are car-free and provide plenty of opportunity for play and meeting.

Opportunity for social contacts

In a 'whole neighbourhood', residents find opportunity for shopping and meeting from morning to evening. There is a supermarket, a bakery, a butcher, a greengrocer's shop, a drugstore, a handful of cafes and restaurants, a fitness center, a primary school, a medical center, craft workshops, offices, green spaces and a wide variety of houses. Here, people who work at home drink their morning coffee, employees meet colleagues and freelancers work at a café table during the quiet hours. Housemen and women do their daily shopping or work out in the gym, have a chat, and drink a cup of tea. People meet for lunch, dinner and socializing on the terrace or in the cafes, until closing time. A good example is the Oostpoort in Amsterdam, albeit one of the larger ones with a station and a few tram lines.

Planning model

On the map above, the boundaries of the neighborhoods with an area of approximately 50 hectares are shown in the form of circles. The circular neighborhood is a model. This principle can already play a role on the drawing board in new neighborhoods to be built. In existing neighbourhoods, drawing circles is mainly a matter of considering local data. The center of the circle will then often be placed where there are already some shops. Shops outside the intended central area can be helped to move to this area. Spaces between existing homes can be reserved for small-scale businesses, schools, small parks, communal gardens and play facilities. Once the contours have been established, densification can be implemented by choosing housing designs that align to the character of the neighbourhood. Towards the outside of the imaginary circle, the building density will decrease, except at public transport stops or where circles border the water, often an ideal place for higher buildings.

If a thoroughfare passes through the center of the circle, this street can be developed into a city street, including a public transport route. Facilities are then realized around a small square in the center of the circle and the surrounding streets.
Incidentally, space between the circles can be used for through traffic, parks, and facilities that transcend districts, for instance a swimming pool or a sports hall or an underground parking garage. Mostly, neighborhoods will merge seamlessly into each other.
It will take time before this dream comes true.
 
 
Follow the link below to find an overview of all articles.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Mobility
Harmen van Sprang, co-founder & CEO Sharing Cities Alliance , posted

AI & The City

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Join us on 28 September to explore how (generative) AI will impact our cities and change the way we live, work & play.

From livability to sustainability, from health/wellbeing to public safety, from transportation to infrastructure, and from economic opportunities to urban planning: there are many opportunities ahead (and already happening).

From ethical implications to regulation, from awareness to safety/trust, and from data quality to technological infrastructure: we also got plenty of challenges to address and overcome.

Like to join this virtual roundtable session on 28 September? Visit http://sharingcitiesalliance.com/events to sign up (for free).

We welcome you to already share your ideas, cases as well as concerns regarding (generative) AI via LinkedIn.

AI & The City is an initiative of the Sharing Cities Alliance & Studio Sentience.

Harmen van Sprang's picture Online event on Sep 28th
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

9. Road safety

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This is the 9th episode of a series 25 building blocks to create better streets, neighbourhoods, and cities. Casualties in traffic are main threats to the quality of the living environment. ‘Vision zero’ might change this.
Any human activity that annually causes 1.35 million deaths worldwide, more than 20 million serious injuries, damage of $1,600 billion and is a major cause of global warming would be banned immediately. Except for the use of the car. This post describes how changes in road design will improve safety.

The more public transport, the safer the traffic

Researchers from various universities in the US, Australia and Europe have studied the relationship between road pattern, other infrastructure features and road safety or its lack. They compared the road pattern in nearly 1,700 cities around the world with data on the number of accidents, injuries, and fatalities. Lead researcher Jason Thompsonconcluded: <em>It is quite clear that places with more public transport, especially rail, have fewer accidents</em>. Therefore, on roads too public transport must prioritized.

The growing risk of pedestrians and cyclists

Most accidents occur in developing and emerging countries. Road deaths in developed countries are declining. In the US from 55,000 in 1970 to 40,000 in 2017. The main reason is that cars always better protect their passengers. This decrease in fatalities does not apply to collisions between cars and pedestrians and cyclists, many of which are children. Their numbers are increasing significantly, in the US more than in any other developed country. In this country, the number of bicycle lanes has increased, but adjustments to the layout of the rest of the roads and to the speed of motorized traffic have lagged, exposing cyclists to the proximity of speeding or parking cars. SUVs appear to be 'killers'and their number is growing rapidly.

Safe cycling routes

In many American cities, paint is the primary material for the construction of bike lanes. Due to the proximity of car traffic, this type of cycle routes contributes to the increasing number of road deaths rather than increasing safety. The Canadian city of Vancouver, which doubled the number of bicycle lanes in five years to 11.9% of all downtown streets, has the ambition to upgrade 100% of its cycling infrastructure to an AAA level, which means safe and comfortable for all ages and abilities. Cycle paths must technically safe: at least 3 meters wide for two-way traffic; separated from other traffic, which would otherwise have to reduce speed to less than 30 km/h).  In addition, users also need to feel safe.

Street design

Vision Zero Cities such as Oslo and Helsinki are committed to reducing road fatalities to zero over the next ten years. They are successful already now: There were no fatalities in either city in 2019. These and other cities use the Vision Zero Street Design Standard, a guide to planning, designing, and building streets that save lives.
Accidents are often the result of fast driving but are facilized by roads that allow and encourage fast driving. Therefore, a Vision Zero design meets three conditions:
• Discouraging speed through design.
• Stimulating walking, cycling and use of public transport.
• Ensure accessibility for all, regardless of age and physical ability (AAA).
The image above shows a street that meets these requirements. Here is an explanation of the numbers: (1) accessible sidewalks, (2) opportunity to rest, (3) protected cycle routes, (4) single lane roads, (5) lanes between road halves, (6) wide sidewalks, (7) public transport facilities, (8) protected pedestrian crossings, (9) loading and unloading bays, (10) adaptive traffic lights.

Enforcement

Strict rules regarding speed limits require compliance and law enforcement and neither are obvious. The Netherlands is a forerunner with respect to the infrastructure for bikes and pedestrians, but with respect to enforcement the country is negligent: on average, a driver of a passenger car is fined once every 20,000 kilometers for a speeding offense (2017 data). In addition, drivers use apps that warn of approaching speed traps. Given the risks of speeding and the frequency with which it happens, this remissing law enforcement approach is unacceptable.
Follow the link below to find an overview of all articles.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Mobility
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

8. Polycentricity

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This is the 8th episode of a series 25 building blocks to create better streets, neighbourhoods, and cities. The question is whether a distribution of services over the whole area contributes to the quality of the urban environment.
 
The central parts of cities like Siena, Amsterdam and Barcelona are overrun by visitors and tourists. Partly because Airbnb has increased its overnight capacity by withdrawing homes from their actual destination. As a result, these cities see their real estate prices rise ans residents leave, making room for expensive apartments, boutique hotels and corporate headquarters. Eventually, old city centers will become amusement parks that offer twenty-four hours of entertainment.

The need for distributed centers

There are no objections against visiting nice cities. The underlying problem is that many of these cities have few other places of interest left, partly due to destruction in the Second World War and their rapid expansion afterwards. Therefore, some cities are in urgent need to create additional attractive places and become polycentric. This aligns with the intention of cities to become a 15-minute city. The figure above is a model developed for this purpose by the council of Portland (USA).
Because of this policy, the prospect is that residents can buy their daily necessities close to home. At the other hand, tourists will be spread. What attractive neighborhood centers look like will be discussed in a subsequent post.

Ancillary centers

Cities without an inordinate number of tourists and visitors also observe a steady grow in the number of events, all competing for the same locations. For this reason, it is advisable that cities have a few ancillary centers each with one or two crowd pullers that divide the stream of visitors. An example is the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao and its newly developed public space around. In world cities such as London and New York, such centers have existed for years, but they are sometimes difficult to find because they are spread over a large area.
Amsterdam too urgently needs one or more ancillary centers. The area between Leidseplein and the Rijksmuseum has potential but lacks unity due to the chaotic intersections of roads and tram lines. The presence of a train or metro station is an advantage, that is why the area near Station Zuid also has potential.

Peripheral centers

Next decade, many visitors will still arrive by car and the best policy is to seduce them to leave their cars at safe transfer points to continue their journey by public transport. For visitors who intend to stay longer, this solution is not optimal. Many will dismiss the perspective of carrying their luggage to the hotel by public transport, although taking a cab is an alternative, albeit expensive. The alternative is the presence of a couple of affordable hotels next to the car park and the development of these areas into attractive public space, with shops, cafes, and restaurants, as a starting point to visit places of interest in the city. These centers can also accommodate major events, such as a football stadium, a music hall, cinemas and open-air festivities, because of the presence of large scale parking facilities. The Amsterdam Arena district is developing in this direction. It used to be a desolate place, but it's getting better. There are excellent train and metro links.

And what about the old 'old' city center?

The public spaces in the old city centers must meet the same requirements as the whole city to prevent becoming an amusement park for tourists. Aside from its carefully maintained and functionally integrated cultural legacy, centers should provide a mix of functions, including housing, offices, spaces for craft and light industry and plenty of greenery dedicated to its inhabitants. The number of hotels should be limited and renting out by Airbnb prohibited. There will be shops for both residents and tourists, rents must be frozen, and the speculative sale of houses curbed. Space over shops must be repurposed for apartments.
 
Follow the link below to find an overview of all articles.
https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/x39qvzkw687rxsjvhsrzn/overzicht-blogposts-Eng.docx?rlkey=vpf7pwlfxkildpr9r062t5gf2&dl=0

Herman van den Bosch's picture #Mobility
Beth Massa, Ozarka B.V. , posted

We urgently need to rent your "wasstraat" and commercial dishwashers or sublease your space to build our own!

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Hi All,
Since 2018, Ozarka works every variety of vendor or restaurant replacing disposable food containers with reusables, big or small, doesn't matter. As you can imagine, we are growing like crazy.

Our wash and sanitation model is decentralized. We have one main wash and sanitation facility called the "Sparkle Jar." We install "outposts" or mini-sparkle jars for wash and sanitation rather than build out more huge facilities. There are a variety of reasons for this (all good, more sustainable, and more affordable for our clients).

We need a lot more of these mini centers. SJ3, SJ4, SJ5...you get the idea. We are looking for partners that have the same commercial dishwashers we have that are not used very often Think office canteens, corporate food courts, hotels. Or, do you have water hookups and extra space that is not being used that we can rent out from you?

The most ideal locations are sort of on the outskirts of the centrum but still inside the A10. Hemshaven or Veemkade area...Oost, West, Noord are ideal locations.

The reuse revolution is really starting to take off! Our growth is going straight up and we need the Amsterdam Smart City community to help us expand our logistics by tapping into infrastructure that already exists.

Beth Massa's picture #CircularCity
Jorrit Saaltink, Project Manager at Amsterdam Trade, posted

Sign up for Smart City Barcelona updates

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Amsterdam trade & Innovate is a member of Trade & Innovate NL that organizes trade missions for entrepreneurs from the Amsterdam Region (MRA).

In november Barcelona Smart City takes place with a special focus on mobility.
Sign up through this link to be included in the updates of the program!

Want to know even more?

Email Jorrit Saaltink, trade developer mobility: j.saaltink@amsterdam.nl

Jorrit Saaltink's picture #Mobility
Pelle Menke, Communications and Programme officer Mobility at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Demoday #19: Mobility as a Commons worksession

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In the coming decades, urban population growth and a rising demand for mobility options will cause strain on our public spaces. The city of Amsterdam will counteract this trend by making private car ownership less attractive for its citizens, while making sure there are enough, well facilitated, alternative modes of transport. One could  think of investments in (more) public transport, and the welcoming of shared mobility providers. Currently, some market players are making use of the latter and sharing cars and sharing mopeds are becoming part of the streetscape. Is this enough?   
 
Mobility as a Commons
On the 23th of March, Diederik Basta and Jop Pék from the municipality of Amsterdam’s innovation department, hosted a working session on the concept of; Mobility as a Commons (MaaC). They introduced this concept by pointing out that currently, we’re not ‘sharing’ our modes of transport but we’re just ‘renting’ them from private companies. This raises a couple of concerns; these parties exist purely to maximize profits, they own and sell user data, their fleet of vehicles is not spread evenly throughout the city, and because it’s only available for those who can afford the service, it’s not inclusive for all.

The municipality is now exploring how to move away from these market mechanisms and facilitate car sharing solutions based in local ownership. This summer, they’ll experiment with pilots in which modes of transport are perceived as a ‘Commons’ and cooperatively owned and used by a group of local residents. Their goal is to gather insights on how to facilitate this form of locally organized mobility in the best way possible and pave the way for emerging initiatives.
 
Paradigm shifts
For this new alternative to succeed, drastic innovation is needed in which public authorities identify and alter their role. That’s why Diederik and Jop are also turning inwards and critically reflecting on the current premises from which they’re acting. Only then, you’ll be able to innovate in a way that you’re breaking free from your current paradigm and its effects. Because they are of such importance, I would like to quickly summarize the three relevant premises:

  1. People act out of self-interest; we assume mistrust. People need control and governance to reinforce the common good. Its effects: A government mistrusting its citizens and legal sealing of documents and procedures.
  2. The municipality owns public space. Public space should be designed and managed by experts to ensure quality, consistency and efficiency of functionalities. Its effects: Struggles with public participation and a focus on efficiency and functionality, instead of social interaction.
  3. The municipality is responsible for a well-functioning mobility system. Public space makes way, and more urban mobility makes people richer and happier. Its effects: Private parties push the mobility system and the government facilitates this, and traveling for work and other (social) activities is the norm.

 
Reactions from the participants
Next to inspiring the working session participants, Diederik and Job wanted to ignite an active conversation with the diverse group in front of them. They wanted to show the parties at the table how important it is to realise from what kind of premises and paradigm you’re currently ‘innovating’, but they were also curious what others thought of their upcoming project.
 
A big theme during the discussion was the fact that this ‘commons’ thinking is finding its way within different themes like the energy- and data transition. Energy cooperatives are emerging at a fast rate and this topic is receiving a lot of research and attention from energy companies at the moment. The same goes for cooperative ownership and use of data, as an alternative to protection and the commercial use of data. The different domains should be actively learning from each other, as learnings should be easily transferable. Furthermore, the group discussed the painful dilemma of the innovation department of the municipality. Their critical stance against their own policies is remarkable, but they need to find a balance where the pilot and its results will be refreshing and creative, as well as applicable in current policies as soon as possible. Finally, the group advised the presenters  to; pay special attention to groups of citizens who have less time and resources available to organize themselves, write down in detail all administrative rules and obstructions that counteract these initiatives, and to not forget the power of private parties altogether; with a clear problem definition, they are able to organise and act at a fast rate.
 
What’s next?
In the coming months, the project’s final preparations and consideration will be implemented. Through the Horizon 2020 (GEMINI) project, The municipality of Amsterdam will cooperate with parties like Townmaking, Smart Innovation Norway, and our partner Cenex Nederland. Together they will guide and research local initiatives within Amsterdam (e.g. de Pijp, Tuindorp Oostzaan, Spaarndammerbuurt), activate a so called ‘Experimenteerregeling’ and create a plug and play system for future local initiatives. Diederik and Jop will incorporate the comments and discussions from this working session, and we’ll make sure to have them share their first learnings with the Amsterdam Smart City network later in 2023.
 
Do you want to know more about this topic, or would you like to get in contact with Diederik Basta or Jop Pék? You can contact me via pelle@amsterdamsmartcity.com, and I’ll connect you!

Pelle Menke's picture #Mobility
Gert Roskammer, Community Manager at Future City Foundation, posted

Slimme Stad Parade 2023 - 25 mei 2023 in Den Bosch

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Er zijn zoveel smartcity-initiatieven dat je soms de bomen door het bos niet meer ziet. En daarom brengen we op 25 mei 2023 in  's-Hertogenbosch alle bomen bij elkaar. Wil je weten welke innovatieve smartcity-initiatieven er zijn die bijdragen aan een leefbare en slimme en sociale stad? Dan mag je de Slimme Stad Parade op 25 mei in het provinciehuis van Noord-Brabant in 's-Hertogenbosch niet missen!

Tijdens dit unieke evenement krijg je de kans om kennis te maken met alle smartcity-initiatieven in Nederland en Vlaanderen. Ontdek welke slimme oplossingen er zijn voor het sociaal domein en hoe we de verstedelijkingsopgaven van de toekomst kunnen oppakken. En leer wat digitalisering en technologisering betekent voor de maatschappelijke opgaven van vandaag.

Dus, wil je weten welke smartcity-initiatieven er zijn die bijdragen aan een betere wereld? Wil je het hele bos kunnen overzien? Kom dan naar de Slimme Stad Parade op 25 mei in het provinciehuis van 's-Hertogenbosch en laat je inspireren!

We starten om 11.00 uur met het officiële programma met een welkomstwoord door de provincie Noord-Brabant en de voorzitters van de twee stuurgroepen. Daarna volgen er pitches tot in de middag. Om 14.45 uur hebben we een theoretische break met professor Albert Meijer over hoe je innovatieve samenwerkingen opschaalt. Een onderwerp dat heel belangrijk is voor beide City Deals en alle andere smartcityinitiatieven.

Klik hier voor het hele programma.
Aanmelden voor de Slimme Stad Parade

Datum: 25 mei 2023, 10.00 - 17.00 uur (inloop 10.00- 11.00 uur). Aansluitend is er een smartcityfeest, waarvan de locatie nog bekend wordt.
Locatie: Provinciehuis 's-Hertogenbosch, Brabantlaan 1, 5216 TV 's-Hertogenbosch.
<strong>Kosten</strong>: Deelname aan de Slimme Stad parade is gratis, voor het feest en eten rekenen we een betaalde toegang.
Wil je op de ochtend van het evenement een badge ontvangen?* Meld je dan aan via de volgende link.

Aanmelden voor de Slimme Stad Parade
 
Praktische informatie
Parkeren: Je kunt het beste parkeren bij Transferium Pettelaarpark. Vanaf het Transferium is het ongeveer 10 minuten lopen naar het Provinciehuis. Meer info is te vinden op denboschregion.nl
OV: Vanaf het station 's-Hertogenbosch reis je of met een OV-fiets of met de bus. Bekijk hier alle bussen.
 
* Meld je je lastminute (vanaf 9.00 uur op woensdag 24 mei 2023) aan of meld je je ter plekke aan? Dan schrijven we je handmatig in met een blanco badge.

Gert Roskammer's picture Conference on May 25th