#Waste solutions
News

Topic within Circular City
Highlight from Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Recap of Demo Days #16 – Circular meets Digital

Featured image

For the sixteenth edition of our Demo Days, we were finally able to meet offline again since the start of the pandemic. This meant: old-school post-its instead of filling online Miro boards. The Circular & Digital Demo Day was hosted at one of our partners’ locations, the Digital Society School at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. From reducing illegal drones in the city to reusing materials through a digital material database, in this article you’ll read all about circular & digital projects our partners are working on.

About our Demo Days

The Demo Days are one of the tools we use to stimulate innovation and encourage connection between our partners and community. The purpose of the Demo Days is to present the progress of various innovation projects, ask for help, share dilemmas and involve more partners to take these projects to the next level. More information about the Demo Days can be found here.

Demo Day: Circular & Digital

Reducing (illegal) drones in the city - Daan Groenink (municipality of Amsterdam)
In Amsterdam, and in many other places in the Netherlands, is not allowed to fly drones. But despite the regulations, many drones are still flown illegally over Amsterdam. Daan Groenink from the municipality of Amsterdam invited the participants to reflect on how the city of Amsterdam can reduce (illegal) drone usage with as little enforcement as possible. Many creative interventions were discussed, such as awareness campaigns, making beautiful drone images public, and renting out drones as an experience.

Subsidy scheme for circular chain cooperation - Suzanne van den Noort en Maartje Molenaar (province of Noord-Holland)
The province of North Holland wants to be 100% circular by 2050. To achieve this, an action agenda has been drawn up for 2021-2025 with strategic and operational goals. The province of North Holland initiated the ‘Circular Economy Subsidy Scheme’ to accelerate the circular transition. The province of North Holland already thought about how this subsidy scheme should work. In this session, the participants gave their feedback. One of the key take outs from the working session was: keep it simple. You want to know that the money is well spent and therefore the conditions of the subsidy scheme should be clear.

Digital material database – Mark van der Putten (municipality of Amsterdam)
The City of Amsterdam is developing a digital material database for the necessary exchange of information to enable the reuse of materials from projects. Projects can use this database to report their available materials or to reserve materials. In this way, a street can be paved with tiles from an old project. The municipality of Amsterdam asked for input from the Amsterdam Smart City network on what to keep in mind while developing a digital material database. During the session, the participants discussed topics such as data governance, data ownership and the advantages of a SAAS solution compared to a self-built database. The municipality of Amsterdam will continue to research how the material database could be used and what the stakeholders think of it during 6 pilot projects.

Want to join the next Demo Day?

Are you working on an innovative project that could use some input? Or are you preparing for an inspiring event that needs a spotlight? Our next Demo Day takes place on the 11th of October. If it fits within our themes (circular, mobility, energy and digital), sent a message to Sophie via sophie@amsterdamsmartcity.com or let us know in the comments. We are happy to talk with you to find out if it's a match!

Would you like to participate in the next Demo Day and share your thoughts on our partners’ innovative projects? As soon as the program for the next Demo Day is determined, we will share it on the platform and give you the opportunity to join as participant.

Curious to mobility & energy projects? Read more about it in the recap of Demo Day Mobility & Energy.

Photo: Myrthe Polman

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #CircularCity
Beth Njeri, Digital Communications Manager at Metabolic, posted

The Circularity Gap Report for the Built Environment

Featured image

The first Circularity Gap Report for the Built Environment in The Netherlands has launched!

The Netherlands has set an ambitious goal: a circular building sector by 2050. However, the built environment in the Netherlands is a massive motor for downcycling. Only 8% of the total material consumption comes from secondary materials.

This report by Metabolic, C-creators, Goldschmeding Foundation and Circle Economy shows new insights and specific actions for businesses, policymakers, urban planners and labour unions to accelerate circularity in the sector.

Get the overview from the summary in Dutch or download the full report in English below.

Beth Njeri's picture #CircularCity
Beth Njeri, Digital Communications Manager at Metabolic, posted

Industrial Symbiosis

Featured image

At the end of its production process, waste or “output” produced by one company can be reborn into a valuable raw material or “input” for another.

This process is called “Industrial symbiosis”.

Learn more about it in the link below.

Beth Njeri's picture #CircularCity
Isabelle van der Poel, projectmedewerker communicatie at De Gezonde Stad, posted

Afval naar Oogst trekt de stad door!

Featured image

Niet langer hoef je jouw groente- en fruitafval weg te gooien, want samen maken we er lokaal waardevolle compost van, met Afval naar Oogst! Op 5 verschillende locaties in de stad kun je je nu aanmelden om GF-afval in te leveren. Op 23 april tijdens de kick-off leer je alle ins & outs. Zo maken we samen de cirkel rond. Composteer je mee?

Afval naar Oogst is ontsproten op buurttuin 'I can change the world with my two hands' waar nu meer dan 100 huishoudens hun GF-afval inleveren, dat wordt omgezet tot goede compost, voor nog betere oogst in de tuin! Het is de ambitie nog veel meer plekken te creëren voor lokale inzameling van groente- en fruitafval.

Isabelle van der Poel's picture #CircularCity
Isabelle van der Poel, projectmedewerker communicatie at De Gezonde Stad, posted

De duurzame toekomst van Amsterdams afvalwater

Featured image

Als je de wc doortrekt, denk je waarschijnlijk niet na over wat er met het water gebeurt. Maar hier gaat een hele wereld achter schuil! En er wordt hard aan gewerkt, om die verborgen waterwereld duurzamer te maken. Als innovatietechnoloog bij Waternet houdt Enna zich bezig met het ontwikkelen van slimme afvalwatersystemen, en wij van De Gezonde Stad interviewden haar.

Wat is jouw droom voor Amsterdam?
“Dat water voor Amsterdammers meer waarde heeft. Dat we het meer respecteren. Nu is het zo vanzelfsprekend dat er water uit de kraan komt, zoveel en wanneer we maar willen. En we gaan naar het toilet, of onder de douche, of zetten de afwasmachine aan, en voor de bewoners is het water weg. Het zou fijn zijn als de hele cyclus meer circulair is. Dat afvalwater niet langer iets is wat vies is, maar dat we het gaan zien als een grondstof die we graag willen hergebruiken. Wat nou als je bij de bouwmarkt een toilet kan kopen die jouw urine apart houdt en daar meststof uithaalt die je zelf in je tuin kan gebruiken of af kan geven alsof het een statiegeldsysteem is. Dan krijgt het zoveel meer waarde.”

Lees op onze website het hele interview en leer de verborgen waterwereld kennen!

Isabelle van der Poel's picture #Energy
Beth Njeri, Digital Communications Manager at Metabolic, posted

The interconnected city: Imagining our urban lives in 2050

Featured image

Our cities are evolving. Fast. How can we ensure they are sustainable, liveable, and healthy?

Metabolic has developed a nature-inclusive, community-centered, and circular city's vision.

This vision of the "ideal" city is only one of many. What's your favorite? Please share the story, vision, book, podcast, or image that best represents the city you hope to live in, one day.

Beth Njeri's picture #CircularCity
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Meet the members of Amsterdam Smart City! Boaz Bar-Adon: ‘Learn children about the circular economy’

Featured image

Boaz Bar-Adon is the founder of Ecodam, a startup that wants to create a place where children can actively learn about sustainability and the circular economy.

“Our big dream is a physical place where children can come to get acquainted with all aspects of sustainability—a kind of science museum, but with more focus on the concept of circularity and the role young people can play in the new economy.
It’s almost a cliche, but our children are the future. If we make them realise that we need to use resources in a different way, they will take that with them for the rest of their adult lives — no matter what profession they enter later. As a museum and exhibition designer, I see there is too little awareness among clients, designers and builders about the scarcity of materials. That should really change for future generations.''

''Recently, my associate, Pieter de Stefano, and I decided that we want to start making an impact as soon as possible. We designed a plastic-themed mobile pop-up lab. We recently gave our first successful workshop, and we plan to do it more often. In our school workshops, we give a brief explanation about circularity and the impact we have on the environment. But the most important part is when the children work on the concept of circularity. Together, we invent solutions and build prototypes. We let the children think about the problem and then let them come up with solutions themselves.”

Unstoppable
“Once it got going, the group we gave the workshop to was unstoppable. A few girls designed an entire landscape from old waste, which was a prototype of an environment where children do not throw away their old toys but collect them. Another group built a submarine to remove plastic from the sea, inspired by the Dutch nonprofit The Ocean Cleanup. The workshop ended with children creating, with specialised machines, new products from plastic waste. In the future, Ecodam could be a place where schools and universities test or show new materials or techniques. Local authorities that want to promote new policies around waste or the circular economy can also work with us. In Ecodam, they can see how children react to their policies. Maybe they will come up with new ideas.''

Permanent space
''We would like a permanent space so we can work with large machines: a shredder, for example, that cuts plastic parts into small pieces or a machine that melts them and can then press the liquid plastic into a mould. Children can create new building materials with these machines, making technology something very tangible and rewarding.

I'd love to hear of any tips people may have for a permanent space. We are a social enterprise, still investigating which business model works best for us. We will probably be partly supported by subsidies, but we are also looking for fresh ideas for smart new financing methods. How can social value be translated into financial value? Our final goal is being able to facilitate as many visitors as possible and provide them with a meaningful and high-quality experience.”

If you’d like to get in touch with Boaz, you can find him on this platform.
This interview is part of the series 'Meet the Members of Amsterdam Smart City'. In the next weeks we will introduce more members of this community to you. Would you like show up in the series? Drop us a message!
Interview and article by Mirjam Streefkerk

Amsterdam Smart City's picture #CircularCity
Jered Vroon, Post-doctoral researcher Human-Robot Interaction at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), posted

Robots voor een schonere stad?

Featured image

Wat als iedereen in de stad op <b>elke</b>straathoek hun afval volledig gescheiden aan zou kunnen bieden – van luiers en lokaal composteerbaar groen, tot plastic en drinkpakken? Niet met de logistieke nachtmerrie van een overdaad aan aparte inzamelbakken, maar met robots die het aangeboden afval naar een centraler punt rijden. Of wat als robots kunnen helpen om het opruimen van vermoedelijk drugsafval efficiënter en veiliger te maken? Of wat als ze de schoonmakers van de stad ondersteunen in het schoon houden van lastige plekken als oevers en kades?

Dat zijn een paar van de ideeën die zijn geoogst tijdens de workshop ‘Robots & een leefbare stad’, op de demodag van Amsterdam Smart City, 16 september 2021. Ik deelde resultaten van ons onderzoek met het AMS Instituut en de TU Delft naar de interacties die ontstaan tussen robots en mensen op straat. Daarna hebben we gebrainstormd over hoe ‘straatrobots’ van nut kunnen zijn voor een schonere stad. Het werd een inspirerend gesprek, door een rijke mix mensen van gemeentes, provincies en onderzoeksinstituten.

Naast de vele ideeën, kwamen ook de meer kritische vragen aan bod. Kan een robot bijvoorbeeld wel omgaan met de onvoorspelbaarheid van de stad? Zouden gebieden buiten de stad dan niet beter werken? Kunnen robots bewustwording verhogen, ‘nudgen’, zonder manipulatief te zijn? Hoe kunnen we dit juist een kans maken voor kwetsbare groepen, zoals mensen met een beperking? Kunnen we niet beter eerst de behoeftes in kaart brengen, in plaats van meteen na te denken over robots?

Kortom, vele inzichten die samen een eerste aanknopingspunt kunnen vormen voor een schonere stad. De diversiteit van de groep gaf hele verschillende perspectieven op het wel of niet inzetten van robots. Een waardevolle aanvulling op waar we zelf al aan dachten. En de nadrukkelijke uitnodiging om de toegevoegde waarde voor mensen voorop te zetten.

Jered Vroon's picture #DigitalCity
Folkert Leffring, Digital Media Manager , posted

City of Amsterdam focuses on sustainability and circularity for the seventh edition of its Startup in Residence innovation programme.

Featured image

The City of Amsterdam is on the lookout for innovators for the seventh edition of its Startup in Residence programme. This year’s programme will focus on the themes of sustainability and circularity, with the city looking for its best entrepreneurs, start-ups, scale-ups and SMEs to develop creative and innovative solutions.

Folkert Leffring's picture #CircularCity
Beth Njeri, Digital Communications Manager at Metabolic, posted

Urban mining and circular construction – what, why, and how it works

Featured image

When the functional lifetime of an object is over, its highest possible value should be retained. This shortens supply chains, increases resilience, and safeguards the environment from manufacturing-related emissions.

Currently, the construction sector is optimized for a linear supply chain. This is mainly due to a lack of information on harvestable materials and their reuse value.

Learn more about urban mining and how it can help us move towards a circular economy.

Beth Njeri's picture #CircularCity
Anne-Ro Klevant Groen, Marketing and Communications director at Fashion for Good Museum, posted

FASHION FOR GOOD MUSEUM LAUNCHES AUDIO TOUR

Featured image

From Wednesday July 28th, the Fashion for Good museum features a new audio tour narrated by Dutch rapper Dio. In the tour, visitors can listen to Dio explain the rise of fast fashion, why sustainable fashion is so important for people and planet, and what kinds of natural materials can be used to create the fashion of the future. The tour is in Dutch and is free to all visitors to the sustainable fashion museum on the Rokin in Amsterdam.

The Fashion for Good Museum audio tour is made possible with the support of the Kickstart Cultuurfonds.

#CircularCity
Anonymous posted

Ready to meet the winners of the No Wast Challenge and their ground-breaking ideas?

Featured image

Ready to meet the winners of the WDCD No Waste Challenge? Earlier this evening, a total of 16 ground-breaking ideas were selected for the top prize, representing a wide range of strategies for reducing waste and its impact on the planet. Each winning team will now gain access to €10.000 in funding and an extensive development programme designed to launch their ideas into action.

“The quality and range of entries we’ve seen in this Challenge is remarkable,” comments Richard van der Laken, co-founder and creative director of What Design Can Do. “In a turbulent year, it’s particularly inspiring to see that the creative community is willing and able to break away from decades of linear thinking and bad design. I’m hopeful that others in the industry will follow their lead.”

Revolutionizing the the taking and making
The winners were determined by an international jury who reviewed every project from a list of 85 high-potential nominees.  Among the ideas to take home the top prize are solutions that focus on the production process – aiming to revolutionise the taking and making of all the things we use and eat. Sustrato (Mexico), for example, combines traditional craft, contemporary design and waste from the pineapple industry to develop a range of sustainable bioplastics. Modern Synthesis (UK) makes use of a similar waste stream, this time from apple farms, to feed microbes that grow fully circular fibers for the fashion industry.

Adressing the underlying problem of consumerism
Meanwhile, other winners are unified by their desire to uproot entire value systems. These projects are looking to prevent waste by addressing the underlying problem of consumerism. Reparar.org (Argentina) for example, is a service which connects individuals to local cobblers and repair shops, working to promote a culture of care and the right-to-repair. Similarly, Project R (Japan), is a community centre that empowers citizens to learn about circular techniques and lifestyles. Together, these winners suggest inventive ways for us to reconcile what we want with what the planet needs. In doing so, they also help to redefine design as a tool that can be restorative and regenerative, instead of merely productive or destructive. Congratulations to all!

ABOUT THE NO WASTE CHALLENGE

What Design Can Do and IKEA Foundation launched the No Waste Challenge in January 2021, calling for bold solutions to address the enormous impact of waste on climate change. The competition was open to innovators everywhere, and offered three design briefs tackling different aspects of our take-make-waste economy. In April, the open call ended with an exceptional 1409 submissions from creatives in more than 100 countries. As part of the No Waste Challenge award package, sixteen winners will now enter a development programme co-created by Impact Hub, which will propel their projects through 2022.

Learn more about the No Waste Challenge at: nowaste.whatdesigncando.com

#CircularCity
AMS Institute, Re-inventing the city (urban innovation) at AMS Institute, posted

Marineterrein Amsterdam Living Lab in full swing

Featured image

During the pandemic, it might have felt as if the world temporarily stood still. However, while most of us worked at home, the Living Lab projects at Marineterrein Amsterdam were still running.

Although dealing with traveling restrictions, social distancing, and the accompanying delays - it was still possible to run the experiments - all within guidelines - and some of the projects developed at a rapid speed. Despite all these restrictions, Marineterrein Amsterdam Living Lab (MALL) was in full swing.

Read on for updates on:

• The autonomous and modular vehicle Roboat
• Roboat meets The garbage module
• Space For Food: from waste water to cultivating purple bacteria
• Respyre lets moss grow on concrete
• The Responsible Sensing Lab
• Side walk robot Husky

AMS Institute's picture #CircularCity
Isabelle van der Poel, projectmedewerker communicatie at De Gezonde Stad, posted

Circulaire fashion wordt het nieuwe normaal!

Featured image

We leven in een tijdperk van 'fast fashion', waarin we vallen van de ene trend in de andere. We dragen een paar keer dat toffe jasje, waarna deze onderin de kast verdwijnt of zelfs wordt weggegooid. Monique Drent pakt deze symbolische 'klerezooi' aan met The Swapshop. In deze winkel lever je jouw kleding in, en kun je met je verdiende punten of 'swaps' weer een tweedehands outfit scoren!

Ik de Swapshop kun je jouw kleding inleveren en hier krijg je punten voor. In de winkel kun je met deze zogeheten ‘swaps’ en een klein bedrag aan servicekosten een ‘nieuwe’ tweedehands outfit scoren.

‘Je draagt bij aan het verkleinen van de afvalberg, je verlengt de levensduur en je hoeft minder te produceren. Het is win-win-win!'

Lees in ons interview met Monique wat zij doet voor een duurzaam Amsterdam en welke mooie samenwerkingen zij opzoekt!💚

Note van ASC: Wil je nog net iets meer weten? Laat het weten in de comments.

Isabelle van der Poel's picture #CircularCity
Jo Weston, posted

Seenons wint de Circular Innovation Award 

Featured image

Seenons heeft een duidelijke missie: mensen samenbrengen voor een wereld zonder restafval. Hoe ze dat doen? Ze hebben een platform ontwikkeld waar restafvalstromen van bedrijven aan circulaire verwerkers worden gekoppeld en vervolgens worden omgezet om tot nieuwe producten. Deze missie is nu beloond met een internationale prijs: The Circular Innovation Award!

Na meerdere rondes was het tijd voor een laatste pitch door een van de founders van Seenons, Joost Kamermans. Een paar highlights van de pitch waren:

  • Seenons matcht jouw overbodige grondstoffen aan producenten die hier iets moois van kunnen maken
  • We faciliteren fijnmazige inzameling door samen te werken met verschillende logistieke partijen
  • We werken samen met zoveel mogelijk lokale verwerkers die hier nuttige producten van maken
  • In het meest ideale geval kopen de ontdoeners deze circulaire producten weer terug, zodat de cirkel rond is
  • Daarnaast maken we dit gehele proces steeds transparanter
  • Zijn nu primair in de randstad actief, maar zullen snel gaan uitbreiden in Nederland en daarbuiten

Terwijl wij groeien neemt de afvalberg af

In de afgelopen maanden zijn we uitgebreid naar meerdere steden. De fijnmazige inzameling in Amsterdam, Utrecht, Den Haag en Eindhoven is operationeel. De software is een stuk verder ontwikkeld; met enkele klikken zijn bedrijven van hun restafval af. Het aantal partners op het gebied van inzameling en verwerking stijgt hard....en we hebben recent een investering opgehaald om onze technologie verder te ontwikkelen en meer circulaire reststromen te onderzoeken.

Op zoek naar ondernemingsverenigingen en gemeenten

We willen alle bedrijven die afval produceren bereiken. Mochten ze lid zijn van een ondernemersvereniging, dan is dat helemaal super. Zo kunnen we samen meer bereiken. Maar iedereen is welkom.. Op dit moment focussen wij ons - naast de traditionele reststromen - op de randstedelijke gebieden voor de stromen koffiedrab en sinaasappelschillen. Daarvoor komen wij ook graag met gemeenten in contact om gezamenlijk de inzameling op te pakken.

Restafval wordt zeep of orangecello

We vinden al onze circulaire verwerkers waste heroes, dus we hebben geen favoriet product. Al is Kusala wel een fantastisch voorbeeld van een verwerker die ‘over-de-datum’ olijfolie verwerkt tot mooie zepen. En Dik&Schil wordt veelvuldig gebruikt op de vrijdagmiddagborrel bij Seenons op kantoor.

De prijs is erkenning van onze visie over hoe je de wereld restafvalvrij kunt krijgen en dat we daarmee in stedelijk gebied ook nog een logistiek probleem oplossen. Ook biedt het ons de mogelijkheid om versneld op te schalen buiten Nederland. We kunnen samen met partijen al gaan kijken naar oplossingen en mogelijkheden. Alleen samen bereiken wij een wereld zonder restafvalvrij en daar hebben we iedereen hard bij nodig!
Lees meer over de projecten van Seenons.

Note van ASC: Heb je input of tips voor voor Seenons? Laat ze achter in de comments.

#CircularCity
Tessa Steenkamp, Spatial Interaction Designer , posted

Stem op De Buitenkans: van grofvuil tot spullen-ruil!

Featured image

De Buitenkans ordent grofvuilstapels, en beschermt spullen tegen de regen. Bewoners kunnen er hun spullen sorteren, tentoonstellen en onderling uitwisselen, voordat deze worden afgevoerd.

Ontwerpprobleem

Op de stoepen van Amsterdam Noord ligt altijd grofvuil. Dit wordt vaak gezien als gedragsprobleem, maar eigenlijk is het meer een ontwerpprobleem. Lokaal eigenaarschap kan namelijk wel: overal staan ruil-boekenkasten, vaak beheerd door bewoners. Hier en daar staat zelfs een rek met gratis mee te nemen kleren, of wordt een bushokje gebruikt om spullen uit te stallen.

Met De Buitenkans passen we dit idee toe op grofvuil ophaalpunten. Bewoners kunnen er spullen sorteren en beschermd uitstallen. De spullen behouden zo langer hun waarde, en worden makkelijker weer meegenomen door buren.

Net als de normale grofvuillocatie wordt De Buitenkans iedere maand geleegd. In de tussentijd worden er spullen en materialen geruild. Bekijk deze korte video, waarin we het concept verder toelichten.

Boost je buurt!

De Buitenkans staat nu in de finale van ‘Boost je Buurt’. Met jou stem kunnen we max €7.500 winnen. Daarmee willen we een prototype bouwen, zodat we kunnen testen of het werkt.

Stem op De Buitenkans - en bouw mee aan een circulaire buurteconomie!
Je kunt t/m 16 juni, 12:00 stemmen.

Note van ASC: Nog input of tips voor Tessa? Laat ze achter in de comments 💬

Tessa Steenkamp's picture #CircularCity
Jochem Kootstra, Lecturer at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

Circulair: Hout ter grootte van Oosterpark hergebruiken

Featured image

Onderzoek van HvA en Metabolic maakt de impact van vrijgekomen hout uit Amsterdamse renovatieprojecten van woningcorporaties zichtbaar: ‘Het Oosterpark zou 30 jaar nodig hebben om al het hout te produceren dat hier beschikbaar komt.’

Hout, metaal, kunststof, steen: er komen veel materialen vrij bij renovatieprojecten. Maar een duidelijk overzicht hiervan ontbreekt. Zonde, want deze materialen bieden mogelijkheden voor hergebruik. Een materiaalstroomanalyse van woningcorporaties Ymere en Rochdale, uitgevoerd door de Hogeschool van Amsterdam (HvA) en Metabolic als expert op gebied van circulair bouwen en materiaalgebruik, laat zien dat er vooral veel hout vrijkomt. Een materiaal dat nog te vaak in de afvalverbrandingsinstallatie belandt, terwijl het een hoog hergebruikpotentie heeft. Het onderzoek is voor de woningcorporaties een eerste stap om meer te doen met hout dat vrijkomt uit hun renovaties.

De cijfers liegen er niet om, in totaal kan er 281 m3 hout uit een selectie van 12 Amsterdamse renovatieprojecten van woningcorporaties Ymere en Rochdale worden gehaald. Dat staat gelijk aan het hout waar een bos ter grootte van het Amsterdamse Oosterpark 30 jaar voor nodig heeft om het te produceren. Meer dan 60% van dit hout wordt verbrand, wat zorgt voor 110.270 kg CO2-uitstoot; evenveel als de jaarlijkse energie- en warmtegerelateerde uitstoot van 29 huishoudens. Als we ons dan realiseren dat dit om slechts een fractie gaat van de renovatieprojecten in Nederland, laat dat concreet zien hoe groot de impact van de gebouwde omgeving is, vertelt Nico Schouten, Green building consultant bij Metabolic.

Hout voor circulaire toepassingen in de Robot Studio

De analyse toont aan dat er met name veel hout vrijkomt van raamkozijnen en deuren, dat mogelijkheden biedt voor circulaire toepassingen, zegt Tony Schoen, projectleider van het onderzoek Circular Wood for the Neighbourhood. ‘In de Robot Studio leren we hoe we dit soort hout kunnen verwerken met industriële robots. Het plan is om met de robots prototypes te maken van praktijkcases gerelateerd aan dit soort renovatieprojecten, waarin we de grootste impact kunnen maken. Wij denken met robots het hout efficiënt te kunnen verwerken, terwijl handmatige verwerking veel te duur zou zijn.’

Hout herproductie

Hout herproductie 2

Studenten en onderzoekers van HvA kunnen in de Robot Studio gaan ontwerpen met de reststromen, wat ervoor zorgt dat de toepassingen makkelijk schaalbaar zijn, verklaart Schouten van Metabolic. ‘Het demontabel in elkaar zetten van producten en het ontwerpen met reststromen is een belangrijke stap om de impact van de bouwsector te minimaliseren. En robottechnieken zijn essentieel om dit lokaal te doen.’

Digitale marktplaats en ontwerpersplatform

Op de lange termijn wil de HvA de gehele keten van houtinzameling tot verwerken in nieuwe toepassingen onderzoeken en ‘in de vingers krijgen’, sluit Marta Malé-Alemany, hoofd van de Robot Studio, af. ‘In dit project kijken we vooral naar de potentie van twee woningcorporaties en zien we nu al de voordelen van een intensievere samenwerking voor circulaire toepassingen. Door bijvoorbeeld de planning en logistiek van gebouwrenovaties per gebied te gaan coördineren, kunnen houten materialen worden vrijgemaakt voor hergebruik waarvan verschillende bedrijven in dat gebied profiteren. Ook gaan we de technische stappen verder onderzoeken in samenwerking met de houtverwerkende industrie. Hiermee willen we ervoor zorgen dat onze ideeën van houtverwerking tot circulaire ontwerptoepassingen geïmplementeerd kunnen worden door de bedrijven’.

Hout circulair

Hout circulair 2

Meer informatie Circular Wood for the Neighbourhood

De HvA voert het project Circular Wood for the Neighborhood (RAAK-publiek-project van Regieorgaan SiA) uit samen met Ymere , Rochdale , TU Delft , Metabolic en andere partners. Het project wordt uitgevoerd door de Digital Production Research Group van het Centre of Expertise Urban Technology van de HvA, waar onderzoek wordt gedaan hoe geavanceerde ontwerp- en productiemethoden (ook wel ‘Digitale Productie’ genoemd) gebruikt kunnen worden om maatschappelijke vraagstukken aan te vliegen. De groep werkt aan onderzoeks- en onderwijsactiviteiten in de Robot Studio.

Metabolic  doet in Nederland veel werk aan het in kaart brengen van materiaalstromen en het onderzoeken van hergebruikpotentie van materialen. Zo hebben zij voor het Economisch Instituut voor de Bouw  (EIB) de nationale consumptie en afstoot van de Nederlandse bouwsector in kaart gebracht en werken zij op nationaal en regionaal gebied veel aan urban mining . Ook doen zij dit op kleinere schaal voor gebiedsontwikkeling en bouwprojecten. De kennis die zij over de jaren hebben opgedaan, zetten zij nu in als achtergrondinformatie voor Circular Wood for the Neighbourhood.

Jochem Kootstra's picture #CircularCity
Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

How plastics became a perfect example of the take-make-waste economy

Featured image

Every year, more than 300 million tons of plastic are produced worldwide, half of which are for single use. Only 10% of all plastics are made from recycled material. Their production contributes to greenhouse gas emissions and plastic waste threats our health.

It could have been otherwise, and it still can as plastics are versatile materials which can be valuable parts of a circular economy.

Unilever leads the way in integrating plastics in a circular economy. Better late than never. The company currently produces 700,000 tons of plastic packaging and it intends reducing this massive quantity by a not-very impressive 100,000 tons in 2025. Moreover, the company wants that all its plastic packaging becomes recyclable, compostable of reusable, and that at least 25% recycled plastic is used in the production of new plastic.

Easier said than done

Recycling is easier said than done. Preventing plastics from entering nature requires a labor-intensive and costly system for collecting and separating waste and technology for high-quality recycling of the collected plastic waste. New machines limit this unattractive work thanks to artificial intelligence. They are able to separate 20 different types of plastics. But consumers must be willing to collect used plastics first.

One of the biggest hurdles in recycling plastics is its pollution, for instance because of added dyes. The Dutch company Ioniqa (now part of Unilever) can chemically reduce PET waste to virgin PET. Large plastic users like Coca-Cola intent to co-operate with Ioniqa. This video shows how chemical recycling works.

Reusable high-quality products

If plastic had been designed for a circular economy from the start, the emphasis would undoubtedly have been on reusable high-quality products, in combination with substantial deposits. Together with Coca-Cola, Proctor & Gamble, Nestlé, Unilever has joined Loop, a platform that develops refillable packaging. Supermarkets that deliver products at home can easily include them in their range. This video shows how the system works.

The ultimate solution

What about using sustainable raw materials like biomass? Unfortunately, biomass from reliable sources is becoming increasingly scarce. Moreover, most bio-based plastics are not biodegradable. If they end up in litter, the effects are as harmful as those of other plastics. Some types of biobased plastics are compostable and might be thrown in the green waste. However, expecting consumers to be able to discern which are and which are not is too much to ask.

Biologically degradable plastics are the ultimate solution. These are biobased materials, which are safely broken down in nature in short time. PHA for example. Unfortunately, years of research have not yet resulted in any viable application.

Ban some types of plastic

A recently opened pilot factory in Almere that cycles plastic waste that otherwise would be burned is a promising step. However, the collection of plastic waste is still inadequate, and a large proportion ends up in nature as visual litter and returns to our food chain as toxic plastic soup. This applies in particular to plastic bags, cups, trays for snacks and soft drinks bottles without a deposit. A ban seems to be the only way-out awaiting a solid system of reuse based on substantial deposits and an advanced system of waste collection and separation and subsequent high-level reuse.

I will regularly share with you ‘snapshots’ of the challenges of us, earthlings, to bring social and ecological cities closer using technology if helpful. These posts represent findings, updates, and supplements of my e-book Humane cities. Always humane. Smart if helpful. The English version of this book can be downloaded for free below.

Herman van den Bosch's picture #CircularCity
Manon Oolders, posted

The Netherlands’ first plastic waste recycling plant is in Almere

Featured image

Green Plastic Factory: a solution for hard to recycle plastic

The Green Plastic Factory in Almere has been officially opened on 29 April 2021. The factory emerged from an innovation partnership between the Municipality of Almere, Save Plastics, a circular company, and the Interreg TRANSFORM-CE project. It is a solution to transform single use plastic from local waste stream into new valuable products. Visit the video of the making-off. 

Why is this a solution for low-grade plastic?

High-grade plastic, familiar to many in the form of PET bottles, is relatively easy to recycle. But about half of all the plastic in the Netherlands is low-grade plastic that consists of various types of plastic that are hard to separate properly and are often very dirty. In the Netherlands, this plastic is usually incinerated. A real shame, says the Municipality of Almere. The town’s Alderman for Sustainability, Jan Hoek, says that “Almere takes the circular economy very seriously and the Municipality plays an active role. In 2018, we started looking for an entrepreneur to start a plastic processing factory in our town. Our idea was that items for the public space could be produced from hard to recycle plastic waste from households in Almere. We could then buy items such as river bank protection, lamp posts and benches and use them in our town. We would then close the loop and create a local circular economy for  plastic waste. We have come a long way and are thrilled that the factory can now be opened.”

How the Municipality and the businesses work together

As part of being the solution to re-use plastic from local waste stream, the Municipality not only supplies the collected materials, but also buys the products that are made from it. This guaranteed procurement is helping get the initiative off the ground and is made possible by a relatively new method of tendering called the Innovation  Partnership. This is a collaboration in which the client and the supplier start collaborating at an early stage without knowing up front what will happen. This tendering process can be used to buy products that are not yet on the market or do not yet meet the required quality standards. It allows the Municipality and businesses to work on innovations, and the products that emerge from the development cycle can then be purchased by the Municipality. The Innovation Partnership includes partners in both the Netherlands and Europe (see below).

The Green Plastic Factory

The Green Plastic Factory, located in an industrial zone called the Vaart in Almere, is a pilot factory that is starting small scale production. The factory is scalable and its capacity can be adapted to meet increasing demand. It is not only used by Save Plastics to manufacture items from recycled plastic, but is also used to process the collected plastic. This dual purpose is new for the recycling industry and it could serve as an example for other cities in the Netherlands and in Europe. Visit saveplastics.nl for Dutch information.

‘Save-tasta’ tiny house at the Floriade

The Green Plastic Factory products will also be displayed at the horticultural expo, the Floriade 2022. They will include benches, decking and fences. There will also be a prototype of the ‘save-tasta’ tiny house. The house symbolises the enormous potential of recycled plastic waste. The modular building blocks for the house are produced in the Green Plastic Factory. The 20 m² prototype contains 7,482 kg of plastic waste. This equates to about five million sandwich bags. By recycling instead of incinerating, 7,419 kg of CO2 emissions are saved. This equates to driving 62,352 km in a car. The prototype can be seen at the Floriade from April 2022.

What is the next step?

In the ideal scenario all stakeholders have a circular mindset: companies, government, educational organizations and residents. The first step is relatively easy: mobilizing the frontrunners. The next step is going to be harder: mobilizing the masses.

What can other cities learn from your project?

We make the circular and upcycling process visible and tangible. Our initiative thrives on the collaboration with education and circular entrepreneurs - together, we take steps towards a circular future.

Who initiated the project and which organizations are involved?

The Green Plastic Factory in Almere is an initiative of the Municipality of Almere and is supported by Dutch project partners – the Province of Flevoland, Cirwinn and the Utrecht University of Applied Science – and European project partners. The latter partners are members of the TRANSFORM-CE project of the Interreg North West Europe programme that is part of the European Regional Development Fund (EFRD).

More information?

For interviews, tours or technical questions, please contact Bram Peters, Director of Save Plastics on +31 (0)6 53 15 29 26 or at bram@saveplastics.nl

For more information about the project and the role of the municipality of Almere, please contact Johan Luiks, jluiks@almere.nl

Follow us on linked-in and twitter @transform_ce

#CircularCity