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Herman van den Bosch, professor in management development , posted

Will MaaS reduce the use of cars?

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In the 18th episode of the Better Cities - The contribution of technology-series, I answer the question how digital technology in the form of MaaS (Mobility as a Service) will help reduce car use, which is the most important intervention of improving the livability of cities, in addition to providing citizens with a decent income.

Any human activity that causes 1.35 million deaths worldwide, more than 20 million injuries, total damage of $1,600 billion, consumes 50% of urban space and contributes substantially to global warming would be banned immediately. This does not apply to traffic, because it is closely linked to our way of life and to the interests of motordom. For example, in his books Fighting traffic and Autonorame: The illusory promise of high-tech driving, Peter Horton refers to the coteri of the automotive industry, the oil companies and befriended politicians who have been stimulating car use for a century. Without interventions, global car ownership and use will grow exponentially over the next 30 years.

Reduction of car use

In parallel with the growth of car use, trillions have been invested worldwide in ever new and wider roads and in the management of traffic flows with technological means.

It has repeatedly been confirmed that the construction of more roads and traffic-regulating technology have a temporary effect and then further increase car use. Economists call this induced demand. The only effective counter-measures are impeding car use and to discourage the perceived need to use the car, preferably in a non-discriminatory way.

Bringing housing, shopping, and employment closer together (15-minute city) reduces the need to travel by car, but this is a long-term perspective. The most effective policy in the short term is to reduce parking options at home, at work and near shopping facilities and always prioritizing alternative modes of transport (walking, micro-mobility, and public transport). Copenhagen and Amsterdam have been investing in bicycle infrastructure for years and are giving cyclists a green track in many places at the expense of car traffic.

For several years now, Paris has also been introducing measures to discourage car traffic by 1,400 kilometers of cycle paths, ban on petrol and diesel cars in 2030, redesign of intersections with priority for pedestrians, 200 kilometers of extension of the metro system and closure of roads and streets. Meanwhile, car use has fallen from 61% in 2001 to 35% now. Milan has similar plans and in Berlin a group is preparing a referendum in 2023 with the aim of making an area car-free larger than Manhattan. Even in Manhattan and Brooklyn, there is a strong movement to reduce car use through a substantial shift of road capacity from cars to bicycles, pedestrians, and buses.

Public transport

Because of the pandemic, the use of public transport has decreased significantly worldwide as many users worked from home, could not go to school, took the bicycle or a car. Nevertheless, cities continue to promote public transport as a major strategy to reduce car use. In many places in the world, including in Europe, urban development has resulted in a high degree of dispersion of and between places to live, shop, and work. The ease of bridging the 'last mile' will contribute significantly to the increase in the use of public transport. While bicycles play an important role in this in the Netherlands, the ideas elsewhere are based on all forms of 'dockless micromobility’.

Autonomous transport

From a technological point of view, autonomous passenger transport involves type four or five at a taxonomy of automated cars. This includes the Waymo brand developed by Google. In some places in the US, these cars are allowed to drive with a supervisor ('safety driver') on board. Type 5 (fully autonomous driving under all circumstances) does not yet exist at all, and it is highly questionable whether this will ever happen. Besides, it is questionable too whether the automotive industry aspires building such a car at a substantial scale. Given their availability, it is expected that many people will forgo purchasing them and instead use them as a shared car or as a (shared or not) taxi. This will significantly reduce car ownership. To sell as many cars as possible, it is expected that the automotive industry will aim for level three automation, which means that the car can take over the actions of the driver, who must stay vigilant.

The impact on cities of autonomous shared cars and (shared) taxis is highly uncertain. Based on traffic data in the Boston area and surveys of residents, a study by the Boston Consultancy Group shows that approximately 30% of all transport movements (excluding walking) will take place in an autonomous car. But it also appears that users of public transport are a significant part of this group. Most people interviewed were scared using an unmanned shared taxi. Without sharing, there will be more cars on the road and more traffic jams in large parts of the city than now. A scenario study in the city of Porto (Portugal) that assumes that autonomous cars are mainly used as shared taxis and public transport is not cannibalized shows a significant decrease in car traffic.

Considering refraining from car use

Designing an efficient transport system is not that difficult; its acceptance by people is. Many see the car as an extension of the home, in which - even more than at home - they can listen to their favorite music, smoke, make phone calls or meet other persons unnoticed. Considering this, the step to alternative transport such as walking, cycling, or using public transport is a big one.

Most people will only decide to do so if external circumstances give sufficient reason. Hybrid working can lead to people wondering whether keeping an expensive (second) car is still responsible and cycling – in good weather – is also an option. Or they notice that because of restrictions driving a car loses part of its attractiveness and that public transport is not that bad after all. Some employers (Arcadis, for example) also encourage other forms of mobility than the (electric) lease car. <i>This lays the foundation for a 'mind set' in which people begin to break down their mobility needs into different components, each of which is best served by another mode of transport.</i> As soon as they realize that the car is an optimal solution only for part of the journeys, they realize that the price is shockingly high and a shared car is cheaper. For other journeys, a (shared) bicycle or public transport may be considered. Against this background, the concept of Mobility as a Service (MaaS) must be placed.

Mobility as a Service: MaaS

MaaS is an app that offers comprehensive door-to-door proposals for upcoming journeys, ranging from the nearest shared bicycle or scooter for the first mile or alternatively a (shared) taxi, the best available connection to public transport, the best transfer option, to the best option for the last mile. For daily users of the same route, the app provides information about alternatives in the event of disruptions. In the event of a delay in the journey, for example on the way to the airport, an alternative will be arranged if necessary. No worries about departure times, mode of transport, tickets, reservations, and payment. At least, ideally.

These kinds of apps are being developed in many places in the world and by various companies and organizations. First, Big Tech is active, especially Google. Intel also seems to have all the components for a complete MaaS solution, after taking over Moovit, Mobileye and Cubic. In Europe, it is mainly local and regional authorities, transport companies (Transdec, RATP, NS) and the automotive industry (Daimler-Benz and in the Netherlands PON).

The Netherlands follows its own course. The national MaaS program is based on public-private partnership. Seven pilots are ready to take-off. Each of these pilots places a different emphasis: Sustainability, accessibility of rural areas, congestion reduction and public transport promotion, integration of target group transport, public transport for the elderly and cross-border transport.

The pandemic has delayed its start significantly. The Gaiyo pilot in Utrecht (Leidsche Rijn) is the only one that is active for some time, and the results are encouraging. Apart from the national MaS pilots, the RiVier initiative was launched in January 2019; a joint venture of NS, RET and HTM in collaboration with Siemens.

Worth mentioning is an initiative from the European Union (European Institute for Innovation and technology - Urban Mobility), Eindhoven University of Technology, Achmea and Capgemini. 21 partners have now joined, including the municipality of Amsterdam. The aim is a pan-European open mobility service platform, called Urban Mobility Operating System (UMOS). The project aims to provide MaaS for the whole of Europe in the long term. UMOS expects local providers to join this initiative. Unlike most other initiatives, this is a non-profit platform. For the other providers, profitability will mainly be a long-term perspective.

The development of the MaaS app is complex from a technological and organizational point of view. It is therefore not surprising that five years after the first landing there are only partial solutions. <b>The basis for a successful app is the presence of a varied and high-quality range of transport facilities, a centralized information and sales system and standardization of various data and interfaces of all transport companies involved.</b> So far, they have not always been willing to share data. A company like London Transport wants to maintain direct contact with customers, and Uber and Lyft don't want to hand over the algorithms they use to calculate their variable fare. This type of data is indispensable for realizing a real-time offer of several door-to-door transport alternatives for every conceivable route, including pricing, and purchasing tickets. It is hoped that licensing authorities will mandate the provision of all data required for a fully functioning MaaS platform.

One of the most balanced MaaS applications is MaaX developed by Capgemini, the Paris Transport Authority and the RATP. This is comparable to the NS and OV9292 app, supplemented by options for carpooling, taxi transport, shared cars, shared bicycles, scooters, electric scooters, and parking.

Does MaaS is viable?

I believe that MaaS as such will encourage very few motorists to refrain from owning a car. This will mainly have to be done through measures that impede car use or reduce the need for it. Nevertheless, MaaS is useful for those who have just decided to look for alternatives. The app also has added-value for users of public transport, for instance if information in the event of disruptions is made available timely.

It is therefore clear to me that this app should be made available as a form of service, funded by the transport providers and the government and can make significant savings in infrastructure costs if car use decreases.

The above deepens two essays included in my e-book Cities of the Future: Always humane, smart if helpful. The first essay Livability and traffic – The walkable city connects insights about livability with different forms of passenger transport and policy. The second essay Towards zero road casualties: The traffic-safe city discusses policies to make traffic safer and the effect of 'self-driving' cars on road safety. The e-book can be downloaded here by following the link below.

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Floor Beckers, Communication professional at Gemeente Amsterdam, posted

Do you have the ultimate solution for a safe cycle path?

In the Netherlands, people like to cycle a lot. However, bicycle paths are not always safe due to the great variety of cyclists, such as cargo bikes and e-bikes, racing cyclists and bicycle delivery drivers. The Amsterdam Bike City (ABC) Innovation Lab from the Municipality of Amsterdam is looking for the best solution for the variety of speeds on the cycle path, to do something about this problem. The ten best submissions may present their solution to a jury of leading professionals.

Do you have the best idea to improve safety on bicycle paths? If so, you will win € 2,000 and have a chance of winning € 45,000 to implement your idea. Take that chance!

More information:

#Mobility
Giovanni Stijnen, Senior program & business developer at NEMO Kennislink, posted

Wat Mensen Beweegt wil duurzame mobiliteit in het ArenA-gebied stimuleren

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In de Johan Cruijff ArenA vond onlangs de kick-off plaats van Wat Mensen Beweegt, een nieuw onderzoeksproject gericht op duurzame mobiliteit in het Amsterdamse ArenA-gebied.

De Hogeschool van Amsterdam en NEMO Kennislink onderzoeken in samenwerking met eventlocaties ArenA, Ziggo Dome en AFAS Live wat ervoor nodig is om bezoekers te stimuleren duurzamere reiskeuzes te maken.

Vaak gaat het bij dit soort vraagstukken over technische of infrastructurele uitdagingen want die zijn van groot belang. Het gedrag van de individuele reiziger speelt vaak net zo’n belangrijke rol. Daarom richt dit project zich op de belevingswereld van bezoekers. Wat beweegt hen om te kiezen voor de auto, trein of ander vervoer? Hoe kunnen door inzicht te krijgen in de rol van emoties en gedrag betrokken organisaties zoals de ArenA worden geholpen bij het faciliteren van een duurzamer reisgedrag? En hoe kunnen we zorgen dat de bezoeker daar zelf actief aan bijdraagt?

Dit project doet hiervoor een eerste exploratieve verkenning. Resultaten worden in het voorjaar van 2022 getoetst op mogelijkheden om de aanpak die is ontwikkeld verder op te schalen.

 Unieke samenwerking

Dit project is een unieke samenwerking tussen de Hogeschool van Amsterdam (Lectoraat Creative Media for Social Change) die creatieve methoden inbrengt en het wetenschapjournalistieke platform NEMO Kennislink dat werkt via constructieve journalistieke methoden. Naast de eventlocaties wordt nauw samengewerkt met het Platform Smart Mobility Amsterdam, ZO Bereikbaar en het Amsterdam Smart City netwerk.

Contact

Wil je meer weten, neem dan contact op met:

 Johan Cruijff ArenA

Maurits van Hövell, Consultant Mobility and Environment, m.van.hovell@johancruijffarena.nl

 Hogeschool van Amsterdam

Tamara Witschge Lector Creative Media for Social Change, t.a.c.witschge@hva.nl

 NEMO Kennislink

Giovanni Stijnen, sr. program & business development, stijnen@e-nemo.nl

Leon Heuts, Hoofdredacteur, heuts@nemokennislink.nl

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Folkert Leffring, Digital Media Manager , posted

Helsinki and Amsterdam invite motorists to ‘code the streets’

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Helsinki and Amsterdam are inviting motorists to take part in a study that aims to offer the most socially responsible driving routes in each city.

Code the Streets – an EU-sponsored mobility initiative which will run throughout October and November – asks drivers to test new functions in the traffic navigation app TomTomAmiGO and Mercedes-Benz’ navigation planner, to better understand how to route motorists in a more environmentally aware way.

This includes suggestions on avoiding roads close to schools, residential areas, and parts of the city with high pollution.

The initiative is a collaboration between the City of Amsterdam, City of Helsinki, Aalto University, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS Institute), Forum Virium Helsinki, Technical University Delft and The Future Mobility Network, and is funded by TomTom, Mercedes-Benz and EIT Urban Mobility.

Read the full story here: https://cities-today.com/helsinki-and-amsterdam-invite-motorists-to-code-the-streets/

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Eline Meijer, Communication Specialist , posted

Redesign of public space in your own area possible?

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Would this simple redesign of the public space in the suburbs of Utrecht, be an option in your area? In a special serie of short videos, Geert Kloppenburg visit suburbs of the large cities in the Randstad in Holland. Here is part 1 Utrecht. Curious what you think of the idea and feel free to share!

Watch the video here:
https://youtu.be/l_l5PRhzfVU

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Jasmyn Mazloum, Communicatie at Gemeente Almere, posted

Onderzoek: Deelmobiliteit in Almere! / Enquête

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Almere is een stad waarin de mogelijkheden om jezelf te verplaatsen eindeloos zijn. Niet alle vervoersmiddelen zijn even praktisch, milieuvriendelijk of gezond. Veel van onze auto’s staan het grootste gedeelte van de tijd stil op de parkeerplaats. Ze nemen kostbare ruimte in en daarbij zorgt het gebruik van de auto voor een minder gezonde lucht.

Wat is deelmobiliteit?
Een oplossing hiervoor kan zijn om voertuigen te delen. Dit noemen we ook wel deelmobiliteit. Niet iedereen een eigen auto, maar één auto die wordt gebruikt door meerdere personen. Naast een auto kun je ook (e-)fietsen of scooters delen. Deze zijn belangrijk om bijvoorbeeld het laatste stukje van het treinstation of bushalte gemakkelijk naar je werk te komen.

De gemeente Almere is benieuwd hoe jij hierover denkt. Jouw mening kunnen we gebruiken bij het opzetten van deelmobiliteit in onze stad. We gaan betrouwbaar om met uw gegevens en de reacties worden anoniem verwerkt. Vul voor ons de enquête in!

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Marije Wassenaar, Program Manager New Business Innovations at AMS Institute, posted

A pebble can start a ripple effect

The time to make a change is now. The world is in motion: COVID19 lockdowns changed our perspectives on life as we know it, the cities we live in are exposed to devastating nature extremes this summer and the IPCC report fast-forwarded our sense of urgency. Do you have an awesome idea that can make an impact, then join the AMS Startup Booster to fast-track your idea. Deadline for applications is extended till September 12.

Are you wondering if the AMS Startup Booster can help you turn your business into a successful business. Then please get inspired by the stories of Mublio and Swugo.

Mublio bootstrapped their business and a year later they're selling their first product! Their first product is tailor-made, affordable, built-in cupboards to make efficient use of the space underneath your stairs.

Swugo wants to help reduce CO2 emissions in our urban environment and attribute to getting Amsterdam car-free by electrifying bikes. The Booster helped them to gain access to a European Mobility accelerator where they have extended their potential client base to other European cities.

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Joren Bassant, Journalist , posted

De deelstep komt eraan! Geofencing, dropzones en ‘eigenaarschap’ moeten hem temmen.

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Vanaf medio volgend jaar mogen elektrische deelsteps de Nederlandse weg op. Dat is leuk voor stepfanaten, maar gemeenten kijken met argusogen naar de ontwikkeling. Want in Europese steden zorgen de steps voor veel overlast. Welke middelen kan je als gemeente inzetten om rommelig geparkeerde stepjes en ongelukken te voorkomen?

#Mobility
Amsterdam Smart City, Connector of opportunities at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Recap of Demo Day #12 - Energy meets Mobility

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We share a quick overview of the mobility and energy projects that are on the minds of our partners and community half way through 2021. In another successful Demo Day we glided from Smart Energy to the first MaaS app. We learned about Code the Streets and easier ways to get projects subsidiest after Corona.

Our demo days are part of a series and are intended for Amsterdam Smart City partners to present the progress of various innovation projects, ask for input, share dilemmas and involve other partners in projects. We give you a recap.

The bottlenecks of Smart Energy - Alienke Ramaker from Royal Haskoning DHV

We want Smart Energy and make use of it in a flexible matter. So it’s not a surprise that pilots and projects pop up to make charging more efficient. But for some reason these projects don’t grow. Tom van Loon from Royalhaskoning DHV (commissioned by TKI Urban Energy and RVO) not only presents the 5 bottlenecks with the help of 40 experts but also gives us action points. The next step is to make these points land. How can we do that?

Amaze - Edvard Hendriksen from Overmorgen/Arcadis

Amaze is the first Mobility as a Service (MaaS) app in the Netherlands. It gives you access to public transport, shared mobility (cars, bikes) and taxi’s with one app. To scale up employers need to be convinced so employees are easily triggered to make use of shared mobility. In September 500 companies will join the launch event. Do you know any employers that should join, or are you one? Let us know in the comments so we can connect you to Edvard.

Code the Streets – Sander Oudbier & Lilian Leermakers from AMS Institute

Creating an app that makes cities less busy and saver, that’s what CODE the Streets is doing. Our region keeps growing and the same goes for our streets, neighbourhood’s and cities so we constantly need to come up with smart ways to organize mobility. Lilian Leermakers explains that the streets of Amsterdam are coded and added to navigation software. This can be used to avoid small streets around schools for instance. They’re looking for 200 users in Amsterdam and Helsinki so they can gather good feedback. The pilot starts at the end of August. Would you like to be part of the test team?

Innovation partners - Eefje Smeulders from City of Amsterdam & Dave van Loon from Kennisland

To give the region an economic and sustainable transition boost, the city of Amsterdam has extra funds available. A chance for our network to get a subsidy for the plans they work on.

Dave van Loon from Kennisland is working on a Dutch subsidy request himself: “energietransitie als vliegwiel voor een leefbare buurt”. An area oriented plan in which co-creation will connect multiple transitions. The idea is to work together with all the parties that are involved; residents, government, companies, energy suppliers, housing corporations and knowledge institutions. The end goal would be a Fieldlab. Would you like to know more and work with Dave on this? Let us know in the comments and we’ll connect you.

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David Bosch, Communication Consultant at Gemeente Amsterdam, posted

Carefree through Amsterdam on a shared bike

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Amsterdam is investing heavily in shared transport. Shared cars, scooters and  bicycles make the city more accessible. That last option is healthy, clean and popular. For those who don’t have a bike, or looking for a second bike, we have a shared bike. The city of Amsterdam will receive 1,400 shared bicycles, including 100 shared electric cargo bikes. Some are allready on the streets; the rest will follow from August 15.

Where can you find shared bikes?
At the Zuidas, along the ‘Westlijn’ of the metro, in Oost and Zuidoost. Electric shared cargo bikes can be found in Oost and Zuid. There is a maximum number of shared bicycles per area. It is a 2 year experiment. Then we'll see if we continue.

• FlickBike: 400 shared bicycles along metro stations on the ‘Westlijn’ (from Henk Sneevlietweg to Isolatorweg) and the bus to Westpoort, from 15 June
• Cargoroo: 100 electric shared cargo bicycles in Oost and Rivierenbuurt (Zuid), from 15 June
• Donkey Republic: 300 shared bicycles in Oost, from 15 August
• Soon to be announced: 400 shared bicycles Zuidoost and 200 shared bicycles Zuidas from 15 August

Where do I park the shared bike?
A shared bicycle is a good means of transport for commuters and visitors. The bicycles are usually located near a public transport junction. They have their own parking spaces and must be returned to 1 of the parking spaces of that provider. Only in those places can you stop the rent. The shared cargo bikes have their own parking space, clearly marked on the ground. You can of course park the bike somewhere else in between, but then you will continue to pay. That way the bikes won't roam, is the idea.

Note from ASC: Have a question? Let’s hear it in the comments!

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David Bosch, Communication Consultant at Gemeente Amsterdam, posted

Whitepaper Shared Mobility Employers (Dutch)

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Due to the many working from home, employers are moving away from fixed travel allowances on a large scale and business lease fleets are also shrinking for the first time in years. In order to meet the travel needs of employees in a good way, more employers are switching to shared mobility as a financial solution.

By focusing on shared mobility, you save valuable parking space, offer your employees a flexible mobility solution and possibly save on your CO2 emissions. Research by the Kennisinstituut Mobiliteit (KiM) shows that a car sharer annually emits 175 to 265 kg less CO2 than before he started car sharing. In addition, shared mobility contributes to better accessibility of the region. Shared mobility is therefore booming: in 2020 the number of shared car users rose by no less than 42% to 730,000.

Municipality of Amsterdam is investing heavily in shared mobility
The City of Amsterdam is working hard to make shared mobility a fully-fledged alternative for everyone who wants to move around in the city. Shared mobility is one of the solutions to keep mobility, quality of life, space on the street and accessibility in the city in balance. There are experiments with shared bicycles and scooters on the street and providers of shared cars are encouraged to offer their services in Amsterdam.

Breikers supports employers free of charge in the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area
The mobility needs of every company and every employee are different. That is why Breikers provides free and independent tailor-made advice. Our interactive mobility scan is even free to use for Breikers participants! Do you need help developing your plans for the realization? In many cases you can re-enable Breikers to come up with the right solution.

To help you on your way, a white paper (in Dutch) has been prepared with the most up-to-date ins-and-outs in the field of Shared Mobility.

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David Bosch, Communication Consultant at Gemeente Amsterdam, posted

16% car owners considering replacing car with shared transport

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Amsterdammers are a lot more positive about shared transport than day trippers and commuters, and cost savings are seen as the biggest advantage. It also appears that many Amsterdammers have old assumptions with regard to availability and costs. The municipality of Amsterdam has therefore launched a campaign to draw attention to the many advantages of shared transport.

Research
The municipality of Amsterdam has commissioned a survey among Amsterdammers, day trippers and commuters. It is clear that Amsterdammers are much more positive about shared transport (49%), than day trippers (36%) and commuters (32%). No less than 16% are considering replacing their car with shared transport. Cost savings (39%), convenience (25%) and environmental benefits (19%) are the main advantages of shared transport. The arrival of mobility hubs, MaaS (mobility as a service) apps and more insight into current car costs are also reasons to opt for shared transport.

Campaign
The campaign makes it clear to the Amsterdammer that there are many advantages when it comes to shared transport. Do you drive less than 10,000 kilometers per year? Then a shared car is quickly cheaper. And it also results in a lot less hassle. In addition, there is the freedom of choice from a wide range of bicycles, scooters and cars, better accessibility in the city and cleaner air because much of the shared transport is electric. But also more space on the street, because if we share bicycles, scooters and cars with each other, fewer means of transport are needed.

Availability significantly increased
In the past year, the supply of shared transport in the city has increased considerably. The number of shared cars in public space has risen from 1,250 to almost 2000 and it is expected that hundreds more shared cars will be added this year. In addition, you can choose daily from about 750 shared cars of Amsterdammers who share their own car. Since last summer, 700 shared scooters have been driving through the city as an experiment and from 15 June, also as part of an experiment, 1300 shared bicycles and 100 community cargo bikes will be added step by step.

Note from ASC: What are your thoughts on this? Let us know bellow.

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Anouk van der Laan, Marketing Manager at Check Technologies B.V., posted

Check start met belonen correct parkeren deelscooter

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Elektrische deelscooter aanbieder Check introduceert vandaag als eerste aanbieder in Nederland een omvangrijk beloningsprogramma om correct gebruik van haar deelscooters te stimuleren. Alle gebruikers van Check doen automatisch mee en sparen vanaf vandaag op verschillende manieren voor gratis ritten. Een van de manieren om beloond te worden is het netjes parkeren van een deelscooter. Op die manier stimuleert Check haar gebruikers om op een verantwoorde manier om te gaan met de publieke ruimte. Dit draagt bij aan de uiteindelijke missie van Check - het leefbaarder maken van steden.

Gebruikers verdienen Coins met netjes parkeren
Het beloningssprogramma heet Coins en heeft een simpele structuur. Alle gebruikers doen automatisch mee en kunnen op verschillende manieren Coins verdienen. Bij 10 Coins krijgen ze de volgende rit gratis. Een van de manieren om een Coin te verdienen is door een positieve parkeerbeoordeling te ontvangen. Iedere gebruiker beoordeelt hoe de scooter door de vorige gebruiker is achtergelaten. Bij een positieve beoordeling ontvangt de vorige gebruiker een Coin. Met deze aanmoediging loont het voor gebruikers om na te denken over hun parkeergedrag en de scooter netjes achter laten. Er wordt niet alleen beloond. Als een gebruiker in een bepaalde periode drie keer een negatieve beoordeling heeft ontvangen volgt een tijdelijke blokkade van het platform.

Check investeert in gebruikers en niet-gebruikers
Gebruikers kunnen elkaar dus een beloning toekennen. Toch is Check niet bang voor hoog oplopende kosten. Paul van Merrienboer, mede-oprichter van Check, is juist blij als het programma op grote schaal wordt gebruikt: “Ons doel is om de makkelijkste weg door de stad aan te bieden. Niet alleen voor gebruikers van onze dienst maar voor álle inwoners van de stad. We bieden pas een echt duurzame oplossing als we met onze gebruikers extra oog hebben voor de schaarse publieke ruimte. We willen probleemloos integreren in steden en zien deze beloning als een investering in de toekomst.”

Een aanmoediging voor duurzame mobiliteit
Ook op andere manieren kunnen gebruikers Coins verdienen, bijvoorbeeld door het maken van een rit langer dan 10 minuten. Onderzoek door de gemeente Rotterdam wijst uit dat 23% van de deelscooterritten in 2020 een autorit verving. Om deze overgang verder aan te moedigen heeft Check eerder al een starttarief ingevoerd op iedere rit. Hierdoor zijn zeer korte ritten relatief duur. Vanaf vandaag worden langere ritten dus ook beloond met extra Coins. Hierdoor wil Check haar gebruikers stimuleren om nog vaker de auto te laten staan. Ook wil Check middels Coins de omloopsnelheid van deelscooters die lang stil staan vergroten. Door een lang stilstaande scooter te gebruiken ontvangen gebruikers Coins. Op deze manier wordt overlast voorkomen.

Zelf ontwikkelde technologie als oplossing
Check heeft het programma in korte tijd weten te ontwikkelen en implementeren. Marco Knitel, mede-oprichter van Check, licht toe: ‘We zien de urgentie van het probleem en omdat we ons platform zelf hebben gebouwd, waren we in staat het programma snel te ontwikkelen.’ In het ontwerpen van de oplossing zijn keuzes gemaakt waar Check trouw blijft aan haar belofte: de makkelijkste weg door de stad aanbieden. Knitel: ‘We willen zo min mogelijk verplichte schermen hebben tijdens het boeken van een rit. Dat proces moet intuïtief, snel en makkelijk zijn.’ Om deze reden is het niet verplicht om een geparkeerde scooter te beoordelen. Het gaat erom dat gebruikers leren herkennen wanneer er sprake is van een goed- of fout geparkeerde scooter en elkaar er in die gevallen op aanspreken.

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Anja Reimann, Projectleider at City of Amsterdam: Chief Technology Office, posted

‘Scaleup Bezoekersstromen’ levert drie ketenpartners op

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Hoe voorkom je dat het te druk wordt op een hotspot? Kunnen we bezoekersstromen voorspellen om gedrag van mensen te beïnvloeden? Dat is precies de vraag die de provincies Noord-Holland en Flevoland, Gemeente Amsterdam en de Vervoerregio Amsterdam aan de markt hebben gesteld. Met resultaat! Uit de dertien aanmeldingen zijn nu drie teams gekozen die door gaan naar de volgende ronde.

Op zoek naar innovatieve oplossingen
De vier overheden zoeken naar werkbare en innovatieve oplossingen voor datagebruik, voorspellen én beïnvloeden. Daarom is de normale manier van aanbesteden aan de kant geschoven en is gezocht naar ketenpartners die samen een totaaloplossing bieden. In de volgende fase schrijven de teams een plan van aanpak waarin zij beschrijven hoe zij het onderzoek gaan aanpakken. Daarna gaan de overheden, kennispartners en de ondernemers echt met elkaar aan de slag. Dit wordt een intensieve periode waarin de plannen van aanpak worden getest op twee verschillende (drukke) plekken.

Voordeel voor alle Vervoerregio-gemeenten
De teams die het traject met succes doorlopen, krijgen een raamovereenkomst. Op dat moment liggen er beproefde oplossingen waar ook andere (semi) overheden en private partijen om zitten te springen. Sterker nog: zij kunnen de oplossing zelf ook inkopen. Zo profiteren uiteindelijk alle gemeenten binnen de Vervoerregio hiervan.

Dit zijn de ketenpartners
De drie ketenpartners (in willekeurige volgorde) zijn:
-          InTraffic B.V., TURNN B.V., en KPN B.V;
-          LYNXX B.V., REISinformatiegroep B.V. (9292) en HERE Europe B.V.;
-          Sweco B.V., Scenwise, Livecrowd, PTV Nederland, TomTom en ViNotion.

Gefeliciteerd namens Provincie Noord-Holland, Provincie Flevoland, Gemeente Amsterdam en Vervoerregio Amsterdam. We kijken uit naar een mooie samenwerking!

Kijk op de website van Scale up voor meer informatie.

Anja Reimann's picture #Mobility