Smart City Academy
Projects

Are you interested in the experiences of others working in smart city projects and organizations? The Smart City Academy provides available knowledge about smart city projects and can help you with project development. This Smart City Academy page provides you with information and researches about the impact and conditions of smart city projects. Professors, teachers and students study the initiation, management, collaboration and scaling of smart city projects and would like to share these results with you. They do so by organizing events and masterclasses, by developing smart city tools and methodologies and by making research and outcomes accessible. You can find everything here. And the good news is.... You can add your knowledge too! Are you working on Smart City research? Please feel free to share your knowledge in the Academy section, under ‘Other research and theses’. The Smart City Academy is powered by the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. If you have any questions, you can contact smartcityacademy@hva.nl

Francien Huizing, Program and Communication Manager at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Wicked Problems

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Te wicked? Niet voor ons.

Wij werken allemaal aan urgente, complexe, maatschappelijke uitdagingen. Issues die schier onoplosbaar lijken, van dilemma’s en paradoxen omgeven, nog niet duidelijk hoe het moet. Wel is duidelijk dát het moet, dat we elkaar nodig
hebben en dat we er NU aan moeten beginnen. Om met de woorden van Jan Rotmans te spreken; we leven niet in een tijdperk van verandering maar in een verandering van tijdperk. En hier hoort een nieuwe gereedschapskist bij.

En of je nou aan energietransitie werkt, andere mobiliteitssystemen, creëren van waterstofhubs, peer to peer autodeelsystemen, het maakt niet uit, we zien dat al deze opgaven op enig moment tegen gelijksoortige barrières aanlopen. Op samenwerking, financiering, privacy, onvoldoende aansluiting op de maatschappij, om maar een paar voorbeelden te noemen.

Unieke samenwerking
Als Amsterdam Smart City netwerk willen en kunnen we deze opgaven niet laten liggen. Door het bundelen van onze kennis en expertise kunnen we als netwerk iets unieks bieden en de wil en durf tonen om deze barrières te doorbreken. De betrokken partners die dit uitdenken en begeleiden zijn RHDHV, Kennisland, Drift, NEMO, Arcadis, Alliander, HvA en Metabolic. Zij bundelen hun expertise en ervaring om de echte vragen boven tafel te krijgen, tot nieuwe manieren van samenwerken te komen en barrières te doorbreken. We richten ons met name op de start van de samenwerking. Gezamenlijk ontwikkelen we een ‘wicked problem aanpak’. Op een nieuwe manier, lerend door te doen, exploratief.

Waar moet je aan denken?
Wat is eigenlijk het echte probleem? Wiens probleem is dit? Hoe kijken anderen er tegenaan? Welke andere partijen lijken nodig? Hoe vind je ze? Hoe ga je om met eigenaarschap en botsende frames? Hoe zorg je dat je al in
een vroeg stadium de maatschappij (bewoners, ondernemers, werknemers, etc) betrekt en hun ervaringen in het project trekt? Het wicked problem team zet nieuwe methoden in voor het beantwoorden van deze vragen. En het creëren van de benodigde commitment om het vraagstuk aan te pakken. Niets staat van te voren vast, want we passen ons aan aan wat we tegenkomen. Met elkaar ontwikkelen we een nieuwe aanpak om de barrières te doorbreken.

Francien Huizing's picture #Energy
Negar Noori, Smart Cities Tech & Policy Researcher at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), posted

Transition from Smart to Inclusive city

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The primary objective of this research project is to enhance an understanding of the concept of inclusion and its criteria in Smart city discourse. The research ambition is applying the result as a tool for benchmarking inclusive smart cities, which can assess and improve them. To apply the result, we aim to work with cities like Amsterdam, The Hauge, and Rotterdam.

Negar Noori's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Negar Noori, Smart Cities Tech & Policy Researcher at Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), posted

Input-Output Modelling for Smart City Development

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While many national and local governments in the world these days are placing their bets on smart city development in countering challenges , few know exactly how to develop them in practice. A high and rising number of publications has appeared addressing the concept of ‘smart city’, but not many address implementation issues. This paper aims at a conceptual understanding of the smart city by describing its various facets and using them to develop an Input-Output model helping policy makers and analysts make reasoned design choices. Using this model allows policy-makers and analysts to further their conceptual understanding of smart cities, envisage design choices they will face during implementation and understand the effects of these choices. Finally, the model and design variables are illustrated by introducing the case of ‘Smart Dubai’. Overall this paper provides an enhanced understanding of the smart city development process which can be used as a support tool for decision making.

Negar Noori's picture #SmartCityAcademy
Bernard MERKX, CEO, owner at GreenWavePlastics, posted

Oceanic Face shields

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Personal protection products made with high plastic recycling content (all green parts) Other parts still work in progress

Bernard MERKX's picture #Citizens&Living
Bernard MERKX, CEO, owner at GreenWavePlastics, posted

OCEAN (and EAR) SAVERS

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Product made with 100% recycled plastics from the maritime industry (obsolete fishing gear and ropes)

Bernard MERKX's picture #Citizens&Living
Sagar Nalini Ratilal Bavarva, Founder & Chief Researcher , posted

Bees Digital Farm

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Ever since the 20th century most of the countries across the globe are still using the traditional way of farming and it’s still going on for the demand and supply of people. As we all know that by the year 2050, the 80 % estimation of the world population will have been living in urban areas which can lead the total population of the world to increase by 3 billion people. With this large amount of increase in population, scientists and researchers are quite worried about the farmland which will be required to generate such a huge demand for food supply to fulfill the necessity to survive. Noticing this fact in mind as what would be the future source of alternative solutions to solve such a type of problem a concept was proposed named “In-House Farming”.

Sagar Nalini Ratilal Bavarva's picture #CircularCity
Vanessa Zhao, Founder , posted

Yellowbox

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Ever gone straight from work to Friday night drinks and had to carry your laptop to the bar? Perhaps you went from university to a sporting event and had to bring your heavy books? Yellowbox is a network of smart lockers you can hire on demand using your phone.

Located all over the city centre, the yellowbox app shows a live map of all yellowbox smart lockers near you. When you arrive at your locker you simply tap a button on your phone and the bluetooth smart locker pops open, and you can begin hiring your locker on demand.

Found in public spaces, beaches, leisure and aquatic centres, retail and entertainment venues, our goal is that if you are in the city centre, you are always within a 5 minute walk from your closest yellowbox.

Yellowbox smart lockers let visitors experience your venue hands-free while keeping their bags and jackets safe.

A Hands-free Customer Experience

Customers without physical burdens report a higher satisfaction rating

Drive Foot Traffic

Adding your property to the live Yellowbox map on the mobile app draws customers to your property

Increase Length of Stay

Peace of mind results in longer stays and increased spend

Brand your space as digital

Associate your development with being safe, relaxing, digital and innovative

  1. Full service - we provide full 24/7 in-app customer service so this will not add any extra workload to staff.
  2. Install anywhere - we have yellowboxes at the beach which is exposed to sun, wind and located outdoors. Because yellowboxes are battery powered, we do not need to consider power sockets when deciding on the installation location.
  3. Retrofit option - already have lockers at your location? Even better! We can easily retrofit your lockers and brand them as digital by replacing old locks with our yellowbox smart lock.
Vanessa Zhao's picture #DigitalCity
Cornelia Dinca, International Liaison at Amsterdam Smart City, posted

Marineterrein Amsterdam Living Lab

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Marineterrein Amsterdam Living Lab (MALL) is a place to research, experiment and test in a real-life setting. To achieve this MALL partners bring together their expertise, network, and communities in the field of research, innovation, urban development and experimentation at this unique location in Amsterdam.

Everyone is welcome to test at the Marineterrein. Given the special location, high demands are made on parties who come to develop and test on the Marineterrein. In addition to thematic alignment with the themes of the parties, careful consideration is given to whether the applications are innovative, whether they ensure connection between people and knowledge and to opt for a clear focus within a relevant issue.

Cornelia Dinca's picture #Citizens&Living
Tayfun Yalcin, Founder at Towards Nature Permaculture Landscaping, posted

Permaculture Impact on Schools, Europa School Transformation

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Our children are growing on paved, 2 dimentional and disconnected school environments. We are here to change that. With our passion Permaculture concept, we designed and created a new style of school garden, which doesn't exist in Amsterdam and if we are not wrong in the Netherlands. It was not the first of our school design/implementation. Laterna Magica School in IJburg Amsterdam is also another example.

You can find further info, photos, videos on our website. We need help from all aware people to inform schools about our services that we can have more impact on our environment and children's connection with nature

Tayfun Yalcin's picture #CircularCity
Yvo Hunink, Concernadviseur Innovatie at Gemeente Den Haag, posted

Conscious Cities

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How might we automate access to a public digital ecosystem for citizens and machines in order to grow a conscious city? How might we incentivize all citizens and companies to interact with the public digital ecosystem of the city in order to improve livability, democratic representation and societal engagement?

Read our ecosystem document

Join our online ecosystem platform

Yvo Hunink's picture #DigitalCity
Menno Houtstra, chairman cooperative , posted

KASKANTINE 4.0

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The Kaskantine will implement together with the neighboorhood its design for closing local resource loops: a kitchen with closed water cycle, preventing local food waste, introduce neighbourhood composting, and organise repair cafe's, sport and musique workshops, etc. Data will be gathered to monitor the resource cycling and methods will be tested to make it more socially and culturally inclusive.

User-created nature-based solutions in an urban environment;

The case of the KasKantine (Greenhouse Cantina), Amsterdam

Historically landscape architecture and infrastructural planning have assigned physical separated functions to landscape in order to upscale and manage resource flows cost efficiently. Rather than monosectoral and large scale linear production systems we can now see a shift to decentralized and locally integrated solutions to close resource loops. In these solutions also citizens can play a more (pro)active role. After being more prominent in rural areas, landscape architecture is now also more active as a lead design principle in urban neighbourhoods. Local integrated solutions for resource cycling efficiency give rise to multiple value production rather than to an increase of local financial income. Either way it increases citizen driven (semi)professional activities in resource management in urban neighbourhoods, as well in its creation and in management.

We see enormous potential in this approach: it can reconnect citizens to nature, it can facilitate in changing lifestyles AND produce the right technology to face our climate and resource crisis. But before it can become mainstream, we see the following challenges and questions, mainly to do with creating sufficient local political support and accessibility to these technological and economic opportunities.

  • How can actors on local level on one side and central sectoral level at the other side co-create and redesign effectively the landscape, necessary to close resource loops locally with sufficient democratic legitimacy?
  • How could citizen-driven services in resource management be held accountable to a broader public and the public sector?
  • How can these nature-based solutions be culturally and socially inclusive?
  • How can socio-economically marginal(ized|) groups profit from this increased multiple-values production?

We can try to answer those questions for one specific case to see how it could work out in practice. The Kaskantine is a not-for-profit volunteer driven garden- restaurant - food coop which has as its main objective to show that more autonomous, off the grid nature based solutions for climate adaptive working and living in urban areas are possible and can be at the same time a new lifestyle. It is a small village of refurbished shipping containers, recycled greenhouses and (roof top)gardens. The Kaskantine is currently being built on its fourth location and is negotiating a 7 years ground lease with the municipality of Amsterdam.

The Kaskantine managed to grow from only one container and a one-man company, 5 years ago, to a cooperative with over 30 volunteers with 13 containers. A second village is being planned of 7 containers in the east of Amsterdam. This has been realised without any external capital investment or subsidies. The strategy has always been: find a solution with the least possible financial costs and turn untapped local resources into value.

In doing so the Kaskantine discovered that although real estate prices in Amsterdam skyrocket, there is still a lot of underutilised land and water, that is without use for people and for nature. Lots of plots are “waiting” to be developed, or are underdeveloped: for one function while there could be double or triple functionalities. We could call this “real estate waste”. The Kaskantine could use land for free because there was no direct market value of that land. And the same counts for other important resources: (rain)water, (solar)energy, food (waste and own production), labour (volunteers) and (natural and waste) materials. The Kaskantine is able to operate with zero fixed costs and therefore able to survive.

Furthermore, with its installations it is trying to integrate all received good and services in local loops. Maximum in, minimum out. This is optimized by integrating different resource loops in one management system.

An abundance of one flow of resources can be absorbed by other resource cycles: Peak solar energy can be used in extra ventilation, aeration and irrigation. Sudden food surpluses are redistributed for free and create network solidarity. The Kaskantine is also able to use resources in all phases of their life cycle, like wood: from construction to fire wood. Or being able by using rest heat in storing it in mass or other spaces, or filtering waste water for irrigation. We call this adaptive capacity: the capacity to buffer abundance and use it later or in an alternative way.

Finally, an alternative lifestyle is embraced, one that is appreciating the value of abundance of local resources, rather than the value of market choice.

We could argue that the Kaskantine is thriving in an alternative economy, that can exist thanks to and despite of the mainstream economy that they are trying to transform. We call this abundance or give economy, in contrast with economy based on consumption and the organisation of scarcity.

Abundance economy as being a sum of relatively autonomous integrated projects in mainstream economy.

Because of its ability to expand autonomously within mainstream economy, and because its abundance economy is not a zero-sum game as long as local resources and waste are underutilised, the Kaskantine is very open for participation. There is no economic argument against including more neighborhood activities, on the contrary. More participation seems therefore to depend more on the capability of cultural inclusiveness: if people feel comfortable within the network of the Kaskantine, or if people feel comfortable to start a sort of “kaskantine” on their own.

First, the opportunity to integrate has been ”built in” into the design of the Kaskantine by a step-in approach. From experience as a guest (exchange, tasting, get inspired, etc) to participation in the design, creation and operation of the Kaskantine and Kaskantine related projects.

Secondly, the Kaskantine is also active in the neighbourhood centre and within a network of community organisations, with a step-out approach. In this case the Kaskantine offers through free workshops a learning curve to adopt small scale installations, like vertical gardens and worm composting, and participate in food saving and storage at home in order to take a step back from mainstream economy into the abundance economy.

An important ambition of the Kaskantine is to negotiate with the municipality a land lease contract in which the landuser takes responsibility for its development and environmental control of the land. This cheaper land rent will hopefully give other “kaskantines” the opportunity to arise.

The Kaskantine has free energy to spend on helping other groups in joining this movement because it can operate autonomously and with low fixed costs. This creates hopeful opportunities for inclusiveness of the proposed solutions. Whether this is done in some kind of co-creation with more central institutions depends more on their own capability to work with local small scale initiatives and on their willingness to change or compensate the negative effects of their lineair production models and on their willingness and capability to change sectoral into integrated policies.

Menno Houtstra's picture #CircularCity
Leontine Born, Coordinator Research and Education at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

EyeBeacons: Wayfinding in Public Spaces

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Navigating from A to B is an essential part of our daily lives.
Unknown routes, busy places and unexpected obstacles are a big challenge for everyone, regardless of what your eyesight is. For people with a visual impairment, this process is primarily a task because they have limited use of spatial orientation and directions in the environment. The EyeBeacons project investigated how new technologies can support people with a visual impairment when navigating through the city.

For more information you can get in contact with Joey van der Bie, researcher at the Digital Life Centre of the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences. Follow this link for further details.

Leontine Born's picture #Mobility
Thomas Dolman, Policy researcher and advisor , posted

BuurtBuik social circulair foodinitiative

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Sharing is caring, as the young folks say.
BuurtBuik is all about sharing food with your neighbors. We cook meals from food that would be wasted otherwise. Thereby, bringing people together around a free three course meal and build their social network. It impacts both environmental and social goals, thus, bridging the gap to a circular social economy. Come around a see it in action, we feed 500 people three course meals every week!

#CircularCity
Tom van de Ven, Driving Force at Mobility Sensing, posted

StreetSense

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StreetSense is an IoT street sensor designed to take every street online. This nifty device not only counts passing vehicles, but also tells you if the street surface is dry, wet, overheating, frozen or gritted. Because StreetSense is self-powered and easy to install it is very economic to operate. Every street online with StreetSense!

Interested? Reach out to us to learn more about StreetSense and our other exciting smart city products.

Tom van de Ven's picture #Mobility
Smart City Academy, posted

RESILIO - Amsterdam Blue Green Roofs

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The EU-UIA funded the programme RESILIO, a project that aims to realize 10.000 square meters of blue-green roofs in four city districts in Amsterdam. The consortium of both public and private partners aims to build an interconnected network of smart roofs, in which sensors and state-of-the-art equipment enable micro-water management on rooftops. This contributes to urban climate adaption and resilience, and can potentially evolve into a scalable solution for water management on rooftops.

This project is co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund through the Urban Innovative Actions Initiative.

<https://www.uia-initiative.eu/en/uia-cities/amsterdam>

Smart City Academy's picture #CircularCity
Smart City Academy, posted

ATELIER - Positive Energy Districts (EU)

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ATELIER is an AmsTErdam and BiLbao cItizen drivEn smaRt cities project funded by the European Commission under the H2020-LC-SC3-2018-2019-2020 Smart Cities and Communities call.
Coordinated by the City of Amsterdam, the project combines the expertise and the commitment of 30 partners from 11 countries.

ATELIER focuses on developing citizen-driven Positive Energy Districts (PEDs) in the two Lighthouse Cities Amsterdam (Netherlands) and Bilbao (Spain). Their successful implementations will then be replicated and tested for feasibility in the six Fellow Cities Bratislava (Slovak Republic), Budapest (Hungary), Copenhagen (Denmark), Krakow (Poland), Matosinhos (Portugal), and Riga (Latvia).

Via dedicated PED Innovation Ateliers, ATELIER will strengthen the local innovation ecosystem and thus remove legal, financial or social barriers to the implementation of smart solutions. The PED Innovation Ateliers will be self-sustaining, continuing for a long time after the project has ended. They will thus become engines for the upscaling and replication of solutions within the ATELIER cities and beyond.

To achieve successful implementations of energy saving measures, ATELIER puts citizens at the centre of all its activities: residents (
To really pave the way for more ‘positive’ cities in Europe, each of the eight ATELIER cities will develop a City Vision 2050 that constitutes the roadmap for upscaling solutions in the long term. The main objective of this is to guarantee a seamless city transformation from planning to implementation and further upscaling and replication.

Smart City Academy's picture #Energy
Julia Úbeda Briones, Researcher, project leader, lecturer at Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, posted

EMPOWER2.0

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The project aims to demonstrate and accelerate the empowerment of citizens to become active energy citizens - and to create local energy communities via existing civil society structures - through development of new solutions (e.g. organisational) and adoption of new, emerging and existing solutions for energy ownership.

Julia Úbeda Briones's picture #Energy
Paul Cohen-Tannugi, posted

Amsterdam Biochar Initiative

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Biochar is a soil amendment made typically from bio-mass through a process called pyrolysis with low-oxygen. By using a low-cost, easy-to-make biochar stove, communities can arrange to turn common waste products into biochar.
The vision behind this project is for healthy and resilient communities. This means that I prefer methods that promote local, DIY and community approach, so that it can quickly scale and adapt to different towns/cities.

Most importantly, carbon being the element behind Life has tremendous versatility. It can be used to filter water and then used as a soil amendment. Or it can be mixed to make better concrete composites for roads (asphalt) and concrete. It can improve manufacturing by making carbon fiber alloys.
Last but not least, it is done through a circular model of using waste such as wood sticks, bio-mass, paper, saw dust mills, anything with carbon, even plastics. The output heat can be captured for heating buildings and cooking stoves. The opportunities are endless.
Sizes of stove vary in function of available supply/demand dynamics. For more information, check the biochar-international.org or Ithaka International.
Thank you.

PS: Stockholm, Sweden has achieved this recently. If the Swedes can do it, we can learn from them and improve together!
http://www.nordregio.org/sustainable_cities/stockholm-biochar-project/

Some guidelines for background and context
https://www.biochar-international.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/IBI_Pyrolysis_Plant_Guidelines.pdf

Paul Cohen-Tannugi's picture #CircularCity
Alan Greenspan, founder , posted

nes.city

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A global network of shared equity rent-to-own properties, offering liquid equity transferring to other properties globally. This will be as if the tenant is co-investing into a 'green REIT' fund along with CSR programs and NGOs, which we will use the crowdfund purchasing new properties, or reinvesting into sustainable urban development, and social entrepreneurs. The vision is to make a new type of bank persay, that offers an AirBnB+WeWork but connected with more community initiatives, like co-living spaces do, however we want to focus on spurring economic development and sustainability for low-medium income communities.

Looking for collaborators to work together and spread this vision.

Add me on LinkedIn and let's chat:

linkedin.com/in/alanjgreenspan

Alan Greenspan's picture #CircularCity
Mirjam Endendijk, Marketing & Communicatie Manager at Luminext, posted

Smart Public Lighting in municipality of Renkum

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The municipality of Renkum wants to switch to smart public lighting throughout the municipality and at the same time build an infrastructure for future Smart City applications, preferably with as few investments as possible. In response to this wish, Luminext (smart lighting), CityTec (service partner) and Primevest Capital Partners (financing) started a partnership to make this project possible.

Kevin Groen, project leader for the municipality of Renkum: “We have been busy in recent years for the tender for new public lighting. We are in need of replacement; our area is outdated and some lampposts are about to fall over. So we cannot wait until the first lampposts are replaced. We are looking forward to a great collaboration in a unique tender form!”

More information:

Please contact Mirjam Endendijk, Manager Marketing & Communications Luminext: <a>mirjamendendijk@luminext.eu</a>

Mirjam Endendijk's picture #Energy